Records Appraisal Report:
Historical Commission

Contents of this report
Agency Contact | Agency History | Project Review | Record Series Reviews

Internal links to series reviews
Legislative appropriation requests
Agency rules, policy and procedure manuals
Meeting files
Organization charts
Correspondence — Administrative
Policies and procedures manuals
Speeches (Exec. Dir.)
County files
State agencies
Commission members - Official
Meeting files of Trust Fund associated boards
Agency building plans and specifications
Texas Preservation Trust Fund Program, development documentation
Architectural awards files
Endangered Historic Properties Needs Assessment Files
County courthouse reviews/files
[County courthouse files — ] Plans/maps/drawings
State grant files — Texas Historic Preservation Grant Program and/or plans/maps/drawings 
Federal grant files — Historic Preservation Fund Grants-in-Aid and/or plans/maps/drawings 
Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program
[Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program —] Plans/maps/drawings 
Recorded Texas Historic Landmark Reviews
[Texas Historic Landmarks —] Plans/maps/drawings
National Register of Historic Places Reviews
National Register of Historic Places — Plans/maps/drawings
Military sites program files
Texas Antiquities Advisory Board meeting files
Texas Antiquities Committee meeting and hearing files
Texas Antiquities Committee audio recordings of meetings
Rules and regulations
Department of the Army: Comment made (not final)
Department of the Army: Plans/maps/drawings
Department of the Air Force: Comment made (not final)
Department of the Air Force: Plans/maps/drawings
Department of the Navy: Comment made
Economic Development Administration: Major projects/rehabs or acquisitions and Economic Development Administration: Comment made/small projects
Economic Development Administration: Plans/maps/drawings 
Environmental Protection Agency: Major projects
General Services Administration: Comment made (not final)
General Services Administration: Plans/maps/drawings
HUD — Community Development Block Grant: One-Phase construction clearances and HUD — Community Development Block Grant: Multi-year project clearances
HUD — Community Development Block Grant: Plans/maps/drawings
HUD — Subdivisions: Multi-phase construction clearances
HUD — Urban Development Action Grant: Comment made, major projects
HUD — Urban Development Action Grant: Plans/maps/drawings
National Park Service: Land/Park Management plan and National Park Service: Property rehabilitation or acquisition
National Resources Conservation Service: Comment made, major projects
Office of Surface Mining and Reclamation/RRC: Comment made, major projects/mines
Texas Historic Preservation Plan Files
Antiquities permits, Final
Litigation files
LaSalle project files
Designated State Archeological Landmarks — Archeological sites
Archeological survey site forms and reports — Final
Platoro Collection files
Archeological site files
Publication development files
Stewardship program files
Marker program development
Cemetery program development
Development of county programs
Sam Rayburn House 
Photo/slide collection
Marker files
County files
Save Outdoor Sculpture (SOS) records
State Board of Review minutes and agenda
State Board of Review meetings — audio and videotapes
Survey and inventory (files of historic resources)
County files [Preliminary National Register files]
National Register project files
Historic resources slide files
Historic resources maps and drawings files
National Register supplemental documentation
Meeting agenda and minutes
Building construction — Project files (Christianson-Leberman complex)
Main Street city files (active/inactive applications)
Correspondence - Administrative
News or press releases
Publication development files
Reports — Annual and biennial agency (non-fiscal
Strategic plans
Texas Antiquities Committee members files
Texas Antiquities Committee, administrative correspondence files of Dr. W.W. Newcomb
Governor’s Office on Antiquities files
Texas Antiquities Code legislation and subject files
Texas Antiquities Committee 20th Anniversary files

Archival finding aid
Texas Historical Commission: An Introduction to Records at the Texas State Archives, 1829, 1847, 1852-1853, 1866, 1870, [ca. 1880]-2003, undated (bulk 1955-2002)


February 5, 1999, Laura K. Saegert, Appraisal Archivist


Agency contact

This agency contact information was current at the time of the report but may have changed in the interim. Please call (512-463-5455) for current contact information of the agency's records manager or records liaison for these records.

Lillie Thompson
Archeology Division
Texas Historical Commission
1511 Colorado Street
Austin, TX 78711


Agency history and structure

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The Texas Historical Commission is composed of eighteen members appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the Senate, serving overlapping six-year terms. Members must be citizens of Texas who have demonstrated an interest in the preservation of the state's historical heritage, and represent all geographical areas of Texas. Beginning in 1995, the membership must include a professional archeologist, a professional historian, and a licensed architect; and two of the members must be from counties with populations of less than 50,000. The governor names the chairperson. The members appoint an executive director to administer the agency. In 1998 the commission had a staff of about 100 employees.

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Texas Historical Commission has gone through a recent agency restructuring in which several divisions were combined. The agency now contains seven divisions, which carry out the following responsibilities of the agency.

  • The Administration Division oversees budgetary, planning, and other executive functions.
  • Staff Services handles personnel, accounting, and other staff functions.
  • The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Antiquities Code of Texas (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.
  • The Division of Architecture administers architectural grants through the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program, monitors the state’s National Historic Landmarks and reviews proposed changes to Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. It also monitors and provides technical consultation on the restoration and adaptive reuse of the state’s architectural resources.
  • The History Programs Division operates the National Register Program and the Local History Program. This division is compiling a statewide inventory of Texas properties significant in American history, architecture, or culture. It nominates the most significant properties to the National Register of Historic Places. It assists designated cities with developing ordinances and programs to preserve local landmarks and also provides other assistance to county officials, nonprofit heritage organizations, and individuals in preserving cultural and historic resources of the state. It operates the Texas Historical Marker program and administers the Sam Rayburn House Museum in Bonham, Texas.
  • The Community Heritage Division operates the Main Street Program, the Heritage Tourism Program, and the Certified Local Government Program. The Main Street Program was created about 1981 and is designed to revitalize downtown centers of cities with fewer than 50,000 people. The program provides cities with architectural consultation, marketing, and interior design training for this purpose. In 1989 the Legislature provided funding for an Urban Main Street Program. The Heritage Tourism Program works with business communities and with civic and educational organizations to promote and preserve historic sites in heritage areas. The Certified Local Government Program was created in 1980 and offers technical assistance to cities and awards grants to help with the development of quality local preservation programs.
  • The Marketing Communications Division, which now includes the former Publications Division, issues a bimonthly newsletter, The Medallion, and provides production services for other departments, including the production of educational and technical materials concerning archeology, architecture, museum laws, and other topics. It also helps coordinate the agency’s annual museum conference and assists with public outreach.

There are several boards associated with the Texas Historical Commission. The State Board of Review evaluates nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. The Antiquities Advisory Board evaluates nominations for State Archeological Landmark status and considers issues associated with the Antiquities Code of Texas. The Guardians of Texas Preservation Trust Fund cultivates and develops sources for the support for the trust fund and advises the commission of potential donors of property or other assets. The Advisory Board of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund makes recommendations on Trust Fund grant allocations and advises on matters relating to more efficient utilization or enhancement of the fund. The Main Street Interagency Council evaluates applications for the Main Street programs.

Affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission until it was abolished in 1995 was the Texas Antiquities Committee, created by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session (1969). This was a nine-member commission with six ex-officio members, including the chairperson of the Texas Historical Commission or his/her designee, the State Archaeologist (whose office was transferred in 1969 from the State Building Commission to the Texas State Historical Survey Committee), the Director of the Parks and Wildlife Department, the Commissioner of the General Land Office, the State Engineer, and the Executive Director of the Texas Department of Water Resources. The three other members were appointed by the Governor with concurrence of the Senate, for two-year terms. These appointed members consisted of a professional historian, a professional archaeologist, and a professional museum director. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

Also affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission between 1971 and 1983 was the Texas Historical Resources Development Council. The Council promoted communication among its member agencies in their coordinated efforts to develop and publicize the historical resources of Texas.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

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Project review

I was assigned to review the records of this agency in September 1998. I have reviewed the agency history in the Guide to Texas State Agencies (1997, 9th edition; 1996, 8th edition; 1972, 4th edition); V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442; V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code); several reports produced by the Texas Historical Commission--Biennial report for 1995-1996; Biennial report for 1993-1994; Request for Legislative Appropriations for FY 2000/2001; Texas Preservation Guidelines, 1995; the Strategic plan for 1997-2001; and the Sunset Advisory Commission report on the agency, 1994. I have reviewed the destruction requests from the Texas Historical Commission, their records retention schedule, and the records of the Texas Historical Commission already housed in the State Archives.

On the current schedule of the Commission there are 12 series designated as archival ("A" code), and 67 series designated for archival review ("R" code). The records are listed as these appear on the retention schedule. The archival series are:

Accounting Division
Legislative appropriation requests
Executive orders
Reports — Annual and biennial

Administration Division
Meeting agenda and minutes
Organization charts

Division of Architecture
Meeting agenda and minutes
Meeting supporting documentation

Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)
Meeting agenda and minutes
Meetings supporting documentation

Community Heritage Development Division (Main Street Programs)
Meeting agenda and minutes

History Programs Division (National Register Programs)
State Board of Review (minutes and agenda)
Meetings – Audio and videotapes

The archival review series are:

Accounting Division
Correspondence – Administrative
Plans and planning records
Agency rules, policies and procedures manuals
Customer surveys
Building plans and specifications

Administration Division
Correspondence – Administrative
Policy and procedures manuals
Reports and studies (non-fiscal)
Reports – Consultants and committees
Reports and papers – Conference
Customer surveys
Speeches (Exec. Dir.)

County files
State agencies

Division of Architecture
Presentations, papers, reports
Agency building plans and specifications
Texas Preservation Trust Fund Program, Development documentation
Architectural awards files
Endangered Historic Properties Needs Assessment Files

Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)
Correspondence – Administrative
Legal opinions and advice (agency in-house counsel)
News or press releases
Plans and planning records
Agency rules, policies and procedures manuals
Reports – Administrative
Reports and papers, Conference
Customer surveys
Rules and regulations
Department of the Army: Comment made (not final)
Department of the Army: Plans/maps/drawings
Department of the Air Force: Comment made (not final)
Department of the Air Force: Plans/maps/drawings
Department of the Navy: Comment made
Economic Development Admin.: Major projects/Rehabs or acquisition
Economic Development Admin.: Comment made/small projects
Economic Development Admin.: Plans/maps/drawings
Environmental Protection Agency: Major projects
General Services Administration: Comment made
General Services Administration: Plans/maps/drawings
HUD – Community Dev. Block Grant: One-Phase construction clearances
HUD – Community Dev. Block Grant: Multi-year project clearances
HUD – Community Dev. Block Grant: Plans/maps/drawings
HUD – Subdivisions: Multi-phase construction clearances
HUD – Urban Development Action Grant: Comment made – major projects
HUD – Urban Development Action Grant: Plans/maps/drawings
National Park Service: Land/Park Management Plan
National Park Service: Property rehabilitation or acquisition
National Resources Conservation Service: Comment made – Major projects (dams, etc.)
Office of Surface Mining and Reclam:/RRC: Comment made – Major projects/mines
Texas Historic Preservation Plan: Files – County
Texas Historic Preservation Plan: Files – Printouts
Texas Historic Preservation Plan: Files – Administrative
Texas Historic Preservation Plan: Files – Shipwrecks
Antiquities permits, Final (completed)
Closed or cancelled permits

History Programs Division (Local History Programs)
Marker program development
Cemetery program development
Development of county programs
Sam Rayburn House

Community Heritage Development Division (Main Street Programs)
Building construction – Project files (Christianson – Leberman complex)
Main Street city files (active/inactive applications)

History Programs Division (National Register Programs)
Presentations/reports/papers

Archeology Division (former Office of the State Archeologist)
Archeological site files
Publication development files
Stewardship program files

Marketing Communications Division
Correspondence – Administrative
News or press releases
(Preservation Week)
Publication development files

There are also 34 series of possible archival value which do not carry any archival codes on the schedule but which we have decided to review for possible archival value. These series are:

Administration Division
Commission members – Official

Division of Architecture
County courthouse reviews/files
Plans/maps/drawings
State grant files – Texas Historic Preservation Grant Program and/or plans/maps/drawings
Federal grant files – Historic Preservation Fund Grants-in-Aid and/or plans/maps/drawings
Military sites program files

Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program
Plans/maps/drawings
Recorded Texas Historic Landmark Reviews
Plans/maps/drawings
National Register of Historic Places Reviews
Plans/maps/drawings

Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)
Litigation files
Designated state archeological landmarks — Archeological sites
Archeological survey site forms and reports – final
Platoro Collection files

History Programs Division (Local History Programs)
Photo/slide collection
Marker files
County files
Save Outdoor Sculpture (SOS) records

History Programs Division (National Register Programs)
Survey and Inventory (Files of historic resources)
County files
National Register Project files
Historic Resources Slide Files
Historic Resources Maps and Drawings files
National Register Supplemental Documentation

Series to be added to the retention schedule of the agency which is being reviewed for archival value:

Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)
LaSalle Project files

The following series did not contain an archival code but were discussed with agency personnel regarding their content and we determined they did not contain materials of possible archival value. These will not be reviewed.

Administration Division
History of Texas Historical Commission Building
Non-profit organizations
(files pertaining to organizations THC works with)
Federal agencies (files pertaining to organization THC works with)

History Programs Division
Annual meeting files (re: setting up Annual Historic Preservation Conference)
Annual meeting binders

Series we have recently received from the Historical Commission which are being appraised and are not on the schedule:

Texas Antiquities Committee members files
Texas Antiquities Committee, administrative correspondence files of Dr. W.W. Newcomb
Governor’s Office on Antiquities files
Texas Antiquities Code legislation and subject files
Texas Antiquities Committee 20th anniversary files

I prepared a list of questions concerning series to be appraised on the retention schedule and mailed these along with our letter of introduction to the Executive Director and the records administrator on September 25, 1998. On October 6, 1998, I met with the agency's records administrator, Lillie Thompson, to ask questions about specific records series and answer questions about the appraisal process. We discussed the appraisal process, the new administrative structure of the agency, questions I had regarding previous requested transfers of records, and several series of files concerning activities undertaken in accordance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470), which are listed on the retention schedule by agency.

We met again on November 6 with the agency staff having records responsibilities from most of the divisions. I answered further questions about the appraisal process and the type of information I needed for each series of records reviewed. The agency had already incorporated changes suggested by their records consultant, Sam Burns, into their records schedule and had prepared a revised schedule, providing me with a copy of it during the meeting. I reviewed this schedule, noting most changes were to records series numbers as required by the latest revised state records retention schedule. A few series titles were changed and the series Rules and regulations was added. The series of Meeting minutes and Meeting agenda present in several divisions were combined into one file for each set of meetings–now Meeting agenda and minutes. The agency files meeting supporting documentation together with the meeting minutes and agenda, so for the several series of board meetings on the schedule these records will be reviewed together as one series, titled meeting files along with the agency name, such as Texas Antiquities Advisory Board meeting files. The agency will also be combining series together in several other situations, most notably in the Section 106 series. For these cases, both series as they exist on the schedule are listed in the series title, but they are evaluated as one series since they are considered by the agency to be one series. For these and a few other cases, the agency is intending to change the series titles on the upcoming recertified retention schedule to reflect their changes. If the new name is known, it is listed in the appraisal decision of the records series review.

Also, the agency is using the new names of their divisions on the schedule, but are not combining separated sets of files which were formerly in two divisions into one place on the schedule. I have placed the series reviews of each division together, those with archival or archival reviews codes listed first, followed by those series (in each division) without codes that we are reviewing. The last several series reviews in the report are for records of the Texas Antiquities Committee recently transferred to the Library and Archives Commission from the Historical Commission but which do not appear on the agency’s schedule. For the change in names, the former name is listed next to the new division name, e.g. Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection).

The agency has also determined that a number of series listed on the schedule for archival review which were empty series. These will not be appraised since there are not any records in those series. These series will be removed from the retention schedule.

The agency records personnel returned the records series review forms back to me within a month, furnishing most of the information I needed to finish the appraisal report. I made a few phone calls the next two weeks to clarify some answers I had received and obtained the rest of the data I needed for the report.

Archives Holdings

Records relating to activities of the Civil War Centennial, 1955, 1961-1968, 12.69 cubic ft.
This accession contains correspondence, minutes, printed materials, reports, and case files for Confederate memorial information markers.

Record of Graves of Civil War Veterans, undated, [size included in above accession]
This series contains military service information and biographical data on Civil War veterans identified in the survey.

Historical Survey Committee records, 1963-1964, 1.88 cubic ft.
This series contains records of graves of civil war veterans, records of historical markers, including photographs, correspondence, and files from a Civil War essay contest.

Chisholm Trail Centennial records, 1965-1967, 2.35 cubic ft.
This series contains correspondence and memorabilia re: the Chisholm Trail Centennial Celebration. Unprocessed.

Historical Commission minutes and agenda, 1964-1998, 2.84 cubic ft.
This accession consists of minutes, agenda, and supporting documentation from meetings of the Texas State Historical Survey Committee, 1964-1973; minutes, agenda, and exhibits for meetings of the Texas Historical Commission, 1973-1998; and minutes of the State Board of Review, National Register Program, 1983-1995.

Texas Antiquities Committee meeting and hearing files, 1969-1992, 9 cubic ft.
This series consists of minutes, agenda, supporting documentation, and exhibits of the Texas Antiquities Committee, 1969-1992. Evidentiary hearings were conducted by the Committee for some issues, usually as part of the regular committee meeting.

Texas Antiquities Committee audio recording of meetings, 1973-1980, 1983-1985, 2 cubic ft.
This series contains audio recordings of Texas Antiquities Committee meetings, either on audiocassette or reel to reel tapes. Dates covered are 1973-1980 and 1983-1985.

Preservation grant reports, 1981-1983, 2 cubic ft.
These are historic preservation grant project completion reports of various historic properties, including some county courthouses, old homes, churches, homesteads, and a railroad depot. 35 reports. Dates of the reports are 1981-1983. Unprocessed.

Preservation grant reports, 1984-1985, 1 cubic ft.
These are preservation grant project completion reports from all county courthouses. Dates of the reports are 1984-1985. Unprocessed.

Records, 1960-1981, 5.71 cubic ft.
This accession was received from the Publications Division and contains news releases (1964-1979), public service announcements, clippings, publications, drafts of speeches (1966-1972), correspondence and memoranda (1974-1981), annual and biennial reports (1971-1974, 1977/78), meeting minutes (1966-1978), workshop materials, legislation, administrative rules, resumes, and notes. Dates for the accession are 1960-1981.

Photographs, county projects, c. 1930-1980s, 0.56 cubic ft.
These are photographs and slides from county historic photograph projects, dating from the 1930s through the 1980s. Unprocessed.

Photographs, Old San Antonio Road Commission, c. 1995, 0.24 cubic ft.
These are photographs from work done through the Old San Antonio Road commission, dating c. 1995. Unprocessed.

Previous Destructions

Several destruction requests have been submitted by the Texas Historical Commission, for fiscal years 1992/1993, 1993/1994, 1994/1995, and 1995/1996. Materials destroyed include personnel files; vouchers, fiscal reports, budget estimates and other financial records; requisitions; insurance files; federal EIS reports; notes; routine general correspondence; administrative correspondence; maps; administrative research files; historical marker ledgers; files from the Farmer’s Home Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency; and microfilm of city council minutes, county court minutes, and other city records, for several cities.

Project outcome

The appraisal of the agency's records is complete. Following are instructions for changes to series on the retention schedule of the Texas Historical Commission, primarily changing, adding, or removing archival codes, to be completed during the next recertification of the schedule. Archival records whose retention has expired can now be transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission at the agency's earliest convenience. Series containing records eligible for transfer are noted.

Archival series

The following series on the schedule remain as archival:

Administration Division

  • Series 4 - Meeting agenda and minutes — Continue to send copies to the Archives regularly. Recommend changing the name to Texas Historical Commission meeting agenda and minutes to distinguish from other board meeting series.
  • Series 7 — Organization charts

Division of Architecture

  • Series 3 — Meeting agenda and minutes — Send copies of all minutes and agenda to the Archives and Information Services Division for past meetings and copies of future meetings either yearly or shortly after the meeting. Recommend changing the name to Meeting agenda and minutes of Trust Fund Associated Boards to distinguish it from other board meeting series.
  • Series 9 — Meeting supporting documentation — Send meeting documentation through 1995 to the Archives and Information Services Division now and later documentation when the retention period is fulfilled. Recommend changing the name to Meeting supporting documentation of Trust Fund Associated Boards to distinguish it from other board meeting series.

Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

  • Series 6 — Meeting agenda and minutes - Send copies of all minutes and agenda to the Archives and Information Services Division for past meetings and copies of future meetings either yearly or short after the meeting. Recommend changing the name to Texas Antiquities Advisory Board meeting agenda and minutes to distinguish it from other board meeting series.
  • Series 21 — Meetings–supporting documentation — Send meeting documentation to the Archives and Information Services Division when its retention period is fulfilled. Recommend changing the name to Texas Antiquities Advisory Board meeting supporting documentation to distinguish it from other board meeting series.

History Programs Division (National Register Program)

  • Series 6 — State Board of Review minutes and agenda — Send copies of the minutes to the Archives and Information Services Division for the following months/years: any minutes prior to October 1983; minutes from 1984; January 1985; 1987; Oct. 1988; Feb. 1990; March 1991; July 1992; Feb. 1993; Sept. 1994; and any after Feb. 1995. Send copies of all agendas.

Community Heritage Development Division (Main Street Programs)

  • Series 4 — Meeting agenda and minutes — Send copies of all minutes and agenda to the Archives and Information Services Division for past meetings and copies of future meetings either yearly or shortly after the meeting. Recommend changing the name to Meeting agenda and minutes of the Main Street Interagency Council to distinguish it from other board meeting series.

Three other archival series have their archival requirement met by sending copies of publications to the Publications Clearinghouse. These series are:

Accounting Division

  • Series 3 — Legislative appropriations requests — A note needs to be added to the Remarks section - "Copies sent to the Publications Depository Program fulfill the archival mandate."

Marketing Communications Division (former Publications Division)

  • Series 13 - Reports, Annual and biennial, agency — This is currently listed on the schedule as part of the Accounting Division. According to the staff it is housed with the Marketing Communications Division. This needs to be changed on the schedule. A note needs to be added to the Remarks section - "Copies sent to the Publications Depository Program fulfill the archival mandate."
  • No number - Strategic plans — Add to the schedule with an archival code of "A", a retention period of AC+6 and a note in the Remarks column - "Copies sent to the Publications Depository Program fulfill the archival mandate."

We have also determined that 16 of the archival review series have archival value. These series need to have their archival code changed to "A" on the retention schedule. Further instructions are provided for each series.

Administration Division

  • Series 2 — Correspondence — Administrative — Once the correspondence has met its retention period transfer it to the Archives and Information Services Division at the end of either the calendar or fiscal year.
  • Series 8 — Policy and procedures manuals — The current manuals the staff has described to us are on file in the Publications Depository. Copies of any future manuals or handbooks created need to be sent to the Archives and Information Services Division. The series title for the series need to change according to the most recent state records retention schedule to: Agency rules, Policies, and Procedures.
  • Series 18 — Speeches (Exec. Dir.) — Transfer the older speeches that have fulfilled their retention requirement to the Archives and Information Services Division and thereafter transfer yearly as the retention period is fulfilled.

Division of Architecture

  • Series 12 — Agency building plans and specifications — These shall remain at the agency as long as it uses the buildings. If is ceases using them and the buildings remain state property, transfer the records to the Archives and Information Services Division.
  • Series 26 — Endangered Historic Properties Needs Assessment Files — Change the retention period to AV. Add a note to the Remarks section — "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."

Archeology Division (former Office of the State Archeologist)

  • Series 1 — Archeological site files — Change the retention period to AV. Add a note to the Remarks section — "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."
  • Series 3 — Publication development files — Change the retention period to AV. Add a note to the Remarks section — "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."
  • Series 6 — Stewardship program files — Change the retention period to AV. Add a note to the Remarks section — "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."

History Programs Division (Local History Programs)

  • Series 2 — Marker program development — Change the retention period to AV. Add a note to the Remarks section — "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."
  • Series 3 — Cemetery program development — Change the retention period to AV. Add a note to the Remarks section — "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."
  • Series 12 — Sam Rayburn House — As long as the agency maintains this facility, it needs to keep these records. If the house at some point ceases use as a historical museum but the state maintains ownership, the files can be transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division.

Community Heritage Development Division (Main Street Programs)

  • Series 9 — Building construction – Project files (Christianson-Leberman complex) — Change the retention to LA. The records can remain at the agency as long as it uses the building. If the agency ceases to use it in the future and it remains state property the materials should then be transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division.
  • Series 11 — Main Street city files (active/inactive applications) — Change the retention period to AV. Add a note to the Remarks section — "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."

Marketing Communications Division

  • Series 5 — News or press releases (Preservation Week) — Transfer the releases which have fulfilled their retention period to the Archives and Information Services Division now, and make yearly transfers thereafter.
  • Series 6 — Publication development files — Transfer files that have fulfilled their retention period to the Archives and Information Services Division now and make yearly transfers thereafter.

Twenty-one series not initially designated for archival review were reviewed and have been determined to have archival value. An archival code of "A" needs to be added to the schedule for these series. Further changes are noted for each series.

Administrative Division

  • Series 11 — Commission members - Official — Change the retention period to AV. Transfer the oldest non-current files to the Archives and Information Services Division now, and transfer files of recent members when the files cease to have frequent administrative use.

Division of Architecture

  • Series 22A — County courthouse reviews/files - Change the retention period to AV. Add a note to the Remarks section — "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission." The agency has stated it is running out of space for this series, so they can transfer the older records to the Archives and Information Services Division now.
  • Series 22B — Plans/maps/drawings - Change the retention period to AV. Add a note to the Remarks section — "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission." The agency has stated it is running out of space for this series, so they can transfer the older records to the Archives and Information Services Division now. Recommend changing the name to County courthouse files — Plans/maps/drawings to distinguish it from similar series.
  • Series 23A — State grant files - Texas Historic Preservation Grant Program and/or plans/maps/drawings [paper] and Series 23B — State grant files - Texas Historic Preservation Grant Program and/or plans/maps/drawings [microfiche] — Change retention period to AV. Transfer the paper files in storage to the Archives and Information Services Division now, the remainder when they cease to have frequent administrative use. Keep the microfiche series as it is.
  • Series 24 A — Federal grant files - Historic Preservation Fund Grants-in-Aid and/or plans/maps/drawings and Series 24B — Federal Grant files — Historic Preservation — Change retention period to AV. Transfer the paper files in storage to the Archives and Information Services Division now, the remainder when they cease to have frequent administrative use. Keep the microfiche series as it is.
  • Series 27A — Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program — Change the retention period to AV. Transfer the files when the agency ceases to have regular use of the records. In the meantime, send copies of reports produced to the Archives and Information Services Division (if the reports contain original materials) or to the Publications Depository (if these are printed reports).
  • Series 27B — Plans/maps/drawings — Change the retention period to AV. Transfer the files when the agency ceases to have regular use of the records. Recommend changing the name to Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program — Plans/maps/drawings to distinguish it from similar series.
  • Series 28A — Recorded Texas Historic Landmark Reviews — Change the retention period to AV. Add a note to the Remarks section — "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."
  • Series 28B — Plans/maps/drawings — Change the retention period to AV. Add a note to the Remarks section — "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission." Recommend changing the name to Recorded Texas Historic Landmark Reviews — Plans/maps/drawings to distinguish it from similar series.
  • Series 29A — National Register of Historic Places Reviews — Change the retention period to AV. Add a note to the Remarks section — "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."
  • Series 29B — Plans/maps/drawings — Change the retention period to AV. Add a note to the Remarks section — "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission." Recommend changing the name to National Register of Historic Places — Plans/maps/drawings to distinguish it from similar series.
  • Series 30 — Military sites program files — Change the retention period to AV. Add a note to the Remarks section — "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."

Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

  • Series 239 — Designated state archeological landmarks — Archeological sites — Change the retention period to AV. Add a note to the Remarks section — "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."
  • Series 242A — Archeological survey site forms and reports — Final [paper] and Series 242B — Archeological survey site forms and reports — Final [microfilm] — Add a note to the paper series — "The archival requirement of this series is fulfilled by sending copies of the reports to the Publications Depository Program." The microfilm series can remain as it is.
  • Series 243A — Platoro Collection files [paper] and Series 243B — Platoro Collection files [mircofiche] — The paper records have already been transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division, so the paper series can be removed from the retention schedule. The microfiche series can remain as it is.

History Programs Division (Local History Programs)

  • Series 15 — Photo/slide collection — Change the retention period to AV. Add a note to the Remarks section — "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."
  • Series 18A — Marker files [paper] and Series 18B — Marker files [microfilm] — For the paper series, change the retention period to AV and add a note to the Remarks section — "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission." The microfilm series can remain as it is.
  • Series 19 — County files — Change the retention period to AV. Add a note to the Remarks section — "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission." Since the agency has made a distinction between old and new sets of county files, transfer the old county files to the Library and Archives Commission now.

History Programs Division (National Register Program)

  • Series 10 — Survey and Inventory (Files of historic resources) — Change the retention period to AV. Add a note to the Remarks section — "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."
  • Series 15 — Historic Resources Slide files — Change the retention period to AV. Add a note to the Remarks section — "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."
  • Series 17 — National Register Supplemental Documentation — Change the retention period to AV. Add a note to the Remarks section — "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."

Four series need to be added to the retention schedule with an archival code of "A." These are:

Administrative Division

  • Meeting supporting documentation — Assign an archival code of "A" and a retention period of PM. Continue to send regularly to the Archives and Information Services Division. Recommend naming the series Texas Historical Commission meeting supporting documentation to distinguish it from other board meeting series.

Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

  • Texas Antiquities Committee agenda and minutes — If the agency decides to keep a permanent copy of the minutes and agenda of this committee, this series needs to be added to the schedule, with an archival code of "A" and a retention period of PM.
  • LaSalle Project files — Assign an archival code of "A" and a retention period of AV. Add a note to the Remarks section — "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission." Also note in the Remarks section that the survey data files are available only in electronic format.

Community Heritage Development Division (Main Street Programs)

  • Meeting supporting documentation — Assign an archival code of "A" and a retention period of 2. The meeting documentation for the years 1981-1995 needs to be transferred to the Archives. Future transfers shall be when its retention period has been met. Recommend naming the series Meeting supporting documentation of the Main Street Interagency Council to distinguish it from other board meeting series.

Several series recently transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division have been appraised to be archival. No further action needs to be taken since they are not on the current retention schedule and are already in the custody of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission. These series are:

Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

  • Texas Antiquities Committee members files
  • Texas Antiquities Committee, administrative correspondence files of Dr. W.W. Newcomb
  • Governor’s Office on Antiquities files
  • Texas Antiquities Code legislation and subject files
  • Texas Antiquities Committee 20th anniversary files

Non-archival series

The remaining "R" series should be considered as non-archival and the "R" code should be removed from the records retention schedule and replaced with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks column for these series — "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999." These series are:

Accounting Division

  • Series 11 — Agency rules, policies and procedures manuals

Administrative Division

  • Series 26 — County files
  • Series 27 — State agencies

Division of Architecture

  • Series 25 — Architectural awards files
  • Series 19 — Texas Preservation Trust Fund Program, Development documentation

Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

  • Series 19 — Rules and regulations
  • Series 63 — Department of the Army: Comment made (not final)
  • Series 65 — Department of the Army: Plans/maps/drawings
  • Series 66 — Department of the Air Force: Comment made (not final)
  • Series 68 — Department of the Air Force: Plans/maps/drawings
  • Series 69 — Department of the Navy: Comment made
  • Series 83 — Economic Development Admin.: Major projects/Rehabs or acquisition
  • Series 84 — Economic Development Admin.: Comment made/small projects
  • Series 86 — Economic Development Admin.: Plans/maps/drawings
  • Series 87 — Environmental Protection Agency: Major projects
  • Series 107 — General Services Administration: Comment made (not final)
  • Series 109 — General Services Administration: Plans/maps/drawings
  • Series 116 — HUD – Community Dev. Block Grant: One-Phase construction clearances
  • Series 117 — HUD – Community Dev. Block Grant: Multi-year project clearances
  • Series 119 — HUD – Community Dev. Block Grant: Plans/maps/drawings
  • Series 121 — HUD – Subdivisions: Multi-phase construction clearances
  • Series 123 — HUD – Urban Development Action Grant: Comment made – major projects
  • Series 125 — HUD – Urban Development Action Grant: Plans/maps/drawings
  • Series 145 — National Park Service: Land/Park Management Plan
  • Series 146 — National Park Service: Property rehabilitation or acquisition
  • Series 148 — National Resources Conservation Service: Comment made – Major projects
  • Series 151 — Office of Surface Mining and Reclam:/RRC: Comment made – Major projects/mines
  • Series 170 — Texas Historic Preservation Plan: Files – County
  • Series 171 — Texas Historic Preservation Plan: Files – Printouts
  • Series 172 — Texas Historic Preservation Plan: Files – Administrative
  • Series 173 — Texas Historic Preservation Plan: Files – Shipwrecks
  • Series 231 — Antiquities permits, Final (completed)
  • Series 232 — Closed or cancelled permits

History Programs Division (Local History Programs)

  • Series 7 — Development of county programs
  • Series 20 — Save Outdoor Sculpture (SOS) records — One change needs to be made to the schedule for this series. Add a note to the Remarks column — "Publications resulting from the SOS! Project need to be deposited in the State Publications Depository."

History Programs Division (National Register Programs)

  • Series 8 — Meetings — audio and videotapes — Remove the "A" code from this series.

Marketing Communications Division

  • Series 2 — Correspondence – Administrative

The following series did not contain archival codes but were reviewed for archival content. They have been determined to be non-archival and no further action needs to be taken in regards to the retention schedule for these series.

Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection

  • No number — Texas Antiquities Committee audio recordings of meetings — Most of the tapes were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division for archival review. They will be offered back to the agency or else discarded by the Archives. The tapes the agency holds can be discarded as the retention period for these tapes has passed.
  • Series 20 — Litigation files — These materials were recently transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division for archival review. They can be offered back to the agency or else we will dispose of them since they have met their retention period.

History Programs Division (National Register Program)

  • Series 11 — County files — I recommend changing the name of the series to what the staff have labeled this series — Preliminary National Register files to distinguish it from other series of the same name.
  • Series 14 — National Register Project files
  • Series 16 — Historic Resources Maps and Drawings files

Empty series

Several series on the schedule did not contain any records nor were they were considered likely by the agency staff to have records created. These series can be removed from the records retention schedule.

Accounting Division

  • Series 5 — Correspondence — Administrative
  • Series 10 — Plans and planning records
  • Series 15 — Customer surveys
  • Series 114 — Building plans and specifications

Administration Division

  • Series 8 — Executive orders
  • Series 10 — Reports and studies (non-fiscal)
  • Series 12 — Reports — Consultants and committees
  • Series 14 — Reports and papers — Conference
  • Series 16 — Customer surveys

Division of Architecture

  • Series 7 — Presentations, papers, reports

Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

  • Series 2 — Correspondence — Administrative
  • Series 5 — Legal opinions and advice (agency in-house counsel)
  • Series 9 — News or press releases
  • Series 11 — Agency rules, policies, and procedures
  • Series 10 — Plans and planning records
  • Series 13 — Reports — Administrative
  • Series 14 — Reports — Annual and biennial, agency
  • Series 16 — Reports and papers — Conference
  • Series 18 — Customer surveys

History Programs Division (National Register Program)

  • Series 7 — Board meeting, supporting documentation
  • Series 5 — Presentations, reports, papers

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Record Series Reviews

Records Series Review
Series Title: Legislative appropriation requests  

Agency: Texas Historical Commission, Accounting Division

Contact: Lynn Ward, 305-2317

Obsolete record series? No

Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes

Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings: Retained by the agency for six years after completion, according to the retention schedule. Actual holdings of the agency are 1970/71-[ongoing], comprising 0.5 cubic ft.

Description: These records are legislative appropriation requests of the Historical Commission submitted to the Legislative Budget Board and others. The records date from 1970/71-[ongoing]. The requests generally contain narrative statements of agency functions or programs. Program objectives are listed, along with a description of each objective, discussions of performance measures, statistics, program need indicators, and expenses--expended, current, and projected, at different funding levels.

Purpose: The purpose of these records is to request specific appropriations from the legislature and to provide justification for the amounts requested.

Agency program:
The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The Texas Historical Commission is composed of eighteen members appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the Senate, serving overlapping six-year terms. The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

There are several boards associated with the Texas Historical Commission. The State Board of Review evaluates nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. The Antiquities Advisory Board evaluates nominations for State Archeological Landmark status and considers issues associated with the Antiquities Code of Texas. The Guardians of Texas Preservation Trust Fund cultivates and develops sources for the support for the trust fund and advises the commission of potential donors of property or other assets. The Advisory Board of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund makes recommendations on Trust Fund grant allocations and advises on matters relating to more efficient utilization or enhancement of the fund. The Main Street Interagency Council evaluates applications for the Main Street programs.

Affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission until it was abolished in 1995 was the Texas Antiquities Committee, created by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session (1969). This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

Also affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission between 1971 and 1983 was the Texas Historical Resources Development Council. The Council promoted communication among its member agencies in their coordinated efforts to develop and publicize the historical resources of Texas.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records:

Legislative Budget Board, Legislative Budget Estimates have been published since fiscal years 1954 and 1955. This publication, a compilation of data for all state agencies, summarizes the fiscal information found in agency-submitted budgets or appropriation requests, but omits most of the narrative.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Legislative appropriation requests
Series item number: 1.1.004
Agency item number: 3
Archival code: A
Retention: AC+6

Archival holdings:
None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:
Archival requirement for this series is fulfilled by sending copies to the Publication Depository Program. Two copies of Requests for Legislative Appropriations must be sent to the Publications Depository (13 Texas Administrative Code, Section 3.4 (3)). The Publications Depository holds 1970/71-[ongoing].

Appraisal decision:
Legislative appropriation requests prepared by state agency commissions provide evidence of an agency's fiscal performance and needs. The Historical Commission's schedule is correct and sufficient. The archival requirement for these records is fulfilled by sending copies to the Publications Depository Program of the Library and Archives Commission.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Agency rules, policy and procedure manuals  

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Accounting Division

Contact: Lynn Ward
305-2317

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained in the Personnel Division until superseded, current manual is dated 1998, fractional.

Description:

This is a personnel policies and procedures manual, describing the policies and procedures for employees to follow, dated 1998.

Purpose:

This manual dictates personnel and related policies and procedures of the commission.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The Texas Historical Commission is composed of eighteen members appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the Senate, serving overlapping six-year terms. Members must be citizens of Texas who have demonstrated an interest in the preservation of the state's historical heritage, and represent all geographical areas of Texas. Beginning in 1995, the membership must include a professional archeologist, a professional historian, and a licensed architect; and two of the members must be from counties with populations of less than 50,000. The governor names the chairperson. The members appoint an executive director to administer the agency. In 1998 the commission had a staff of about 100 employees.

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Topical

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None stated

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Agency rules, policies and procedures manuals
Series item number: 1.1.025
Agency item number: 11
Archival code: R
Retention: US+3

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

This is a personnel policy and procedure manual. Personnel manuals are not considered to be archival. The "R" code can be removed from the retention schedule and replaced with the archival code of "E." A note should be added to the Remarks column — "Archival code removed subsequent to appraisal by Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Meeting files  

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Administration Division

Contact: Marlene Casarez, Executive Assistant
463-5768

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: 2 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency permanently according to the retention schedule. Current holdings are c. 1970-[ongoing], about 2 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains the minutes and agenda of the Texas State Historical Survey Committee meetings, from 1964-1973; and minutes, agenda, and exhibits and other materials presented to commission members for discussion or review at the meetings of the Texas Historical Commission, dating 1973-[ongoing]. Total dates for the series are 1964-[ongoing]. Materials present include agenda, minutes, committee reports, resolutions, lists of appointees to associated boards, quarterly reports from programs, rules and regulations, copies of agreements, press releases, lists of sites nominated for historical markers or landmark status, historical marker dedication calendar, lists of gifts and donations, lists of grants approved, attendance sheets for guests at the meetings, and newsletters, reports and other publications of the agency.

Topics discussed at the meetings include division activities, changes in or addition to historic preservation or antiquities laws, significant archeological discoveries, preservation and/or outreach activities underway by the agency, actions of associated boards, grant programs, historical markers to be awarded, sites receiving landmark status, etc.

Purpose:

This series documents the actions of the Texas Historical Commission and its predecessor agencies.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The Texas Historical Commission is composed of eighteen members appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the Senate, serving overlapping six-year terms. Members must be citizens of Texas who have demonstrated an interest in the preservation of the state's historical heritage, and represent all geographical areas of Texas. Beginning in 1995, the membership must include a professional archeologist, a professional historian, and a licensed architect; and two of the members must be from counties with populations of less than 50,000. The governor names the chairperson. The members appoint an executive director to administer the agency. In 1998 the commission had a staff of about 100 employees.

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

There are several boards associated with the Texas Historical Commission. The State Board of Review evaluates nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. The Antiquities Advisory Board evaluates nominations for State Archeological Landmark status and considers issues associated with the Antiquities Code of Texas. The Guardians of Texas Preservation Trust Fund cultivates and develops sources for the support for the trust fund and advises the commission of potential donors of property or other assets. The Advisory Board of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund makes recommendations on Trust Fund grant allocations and advises on matters relating to more efficient utilization or enhancement of the fund. The Main Street Interagency Council evaluates applications for the Main Street programs.

Affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission until it was abolished in 1995 was the Texas Antiquities Committee, created by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session (1969). This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

Also affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission between 1971 and 1983 was the Texas Historical Resources Development Council. The Council promoted communication among its member agencies in their coordinated efforts to develop and publicize the historical resources of Texas.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None present from 1953-1963; agency is missing files prior to about 1970.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Meeting agenda and minutes
Series item number: 1.1.058
Agency item number: 4
Archival code: A
Retention: PM

Suggested series from state records retention schedule:

Title: Meeting supporting documentation
Series item number: 1.1.062
Agency item number: to be assigned
Archival code: A
Retention: 2

Archival holdings:

Texas Historical Commission meeting files, 1964-[ongoing], 2.71 cubic ft.
This series contains the minutes and agenda of the Texas State Historical Survey Committee meetings, from 1964-1973, and minutes, agenda, exhibits, and other meeting supporting documentation for the meetings of the Texas Historical Commission meetings, from 1973-[ongoing].

Appraisal decision:

Meeting minutes of agency boards and commissions provides the highest level documentation of the actions of the agencies they govern. These are already considered to be archival. The Historical Commission already sends copies of the minutes, agenda, and meeting supporting documentation to the Library and Archives Commission. The agency needs to add the series title of Meeting supporting documentation to the retention schedule as listed above.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Organization charts

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Administration Division

Contact: Marlene Casarez, Executive Assistant
463-5768

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: none

Agency holdings:

The organization charts are published in the agency’s biennial report to the legislature and not maintained separately according to the agency. The agency holds reports containing the charts for the years 1977/78-[ongoing], fractional.

Description:

Organization charts illustrate graphically the administrative structure of the different functional units within an agency. Dates covered are 1977/78-[ongoing]. Copies of the organization charts have been published in the agency’s biennial report starting with the 1977-1978 biennial report.

Purpose:

These charts illustrate graphically the administrative structure of the different functional units within an agency.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The Texas Historical Commission is composed of eighteen members appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the Senate, serving overlapping six-year terms. The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Texas Historical Commission has gone through a recent agency restructuring in which several divisions were combined. The agency now contains seven divisions, which carry out the following responsibilities of the agency.

 

  • The Administration Division oversees budgetary, planning, and other executive functions.
  • Staff Services handles personnel, accounting, and other staff functions.
  • The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Antiquities Code of Texas (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.
  • The Division of Architecture administers architectural grants through the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program, monitors the state’s National Historic Landmarks and reviews proposed changes to Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. It also monitors and provides technical consultation on the restoration and adaptive reuse of the state’s architectural resources.
  • The History Programs Division operates the National Register Program and the Local History Program. This division is compiling a statewide inventory of Texas properties significant in American history, architecture, or culture. It nominates the most significant properties to the National Register of Historic Places. It assists designated cities with developing ordinances and programs to preserve local landmarks and also provides other assistance to county officials, nonprofit heritage organizations, and individuals in preserving cultural and historic resources of the state. It operates the Texas Historical Marker program and administers the Sam Rayburn House Museum in Bonham, Texas.
  • The Community Heritage Division operates the Main Street Program, the Heritage Tourism Program, and the Certified Local Government Program. The Main Street Program was created about 1981 and is designed to revitalize downtown centers of cities with fewer than 50,000 people. The program provides cities with architectural consultation, marketing, and interior design training for this purpose. In 1989 the Legislature provided funding for an Urban Main Street Program. The Heritage Tourism Program works with business communities and with civic and educational organizations to promote and preserve historic sites in heritage areas. The Certified Local Government Program was created in 1980 and offers technical assistance to cities and awards grants to help with the development of quality local preservation programs.
  • The Marketing Communications Division, which now includes the former Publications Division, issues a bimonthly newsletter, The Medallion, and provides production services for other departments, including the production of educational and technical materials concerning archeology, architecture, museum laws, and other topics. It also helps coordinate the agency’s annual museum conference and assists with public outreach.

There are several boards associated with the Texas Historical Commission. The State Board of Review evaluates nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. The Antiquities Advisory Board evaluates nominations for State Archeological Landmark status and considers issues associated with the Antiquities Code of Texas. The Guardians of Texas Preservation Trust Fund cultivates and develops sources for the support for the trust fund and advises the commission of potential donors of property or other assets. The Advisory Board of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund makes recommendations on Trust Fund grant allocations and advises on matters relating to more efficient utilization or enhancement of the fund. The Main Street Interagency Council evaluates applications for the Main Street programs.

Affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission until it was abolished in 1995 was the Texas Antiquities Committee, created by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session (1969). This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

Also affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission between 1971 and 1983 was the Texas Historical Resources Development Council. The Council promoted communication among its member agencies in their coordinated efforts to develop and publicize the historical resources of Texas.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: unknown when the charts were first created, charts first appear in the 1977-1978 biennial report.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records:

A copy of the chart is published in the agency’s biennial report.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Organization charts
Series item number: 1.1.023
Agency item number: 7
Archival code: A
Retention: US

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission

Texas Documents Depository holdings:

Organization charts appear in the biennial reports for the years 1977/78-[ongoing].

Appraisal decision:

Organization charts provide a graphic description of the administrative structure of the different functional units of the agency. These have been appraised to be an archival record. The chart is published in the agency’s biennial report, which fulfills the archival requirement.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Correspondence — Administrative

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Administration Division

Contact: Marlene Casarez, Executive Assistant
463-5768

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for three years according to the retention schedule. Current holdings of the agency are 1998-[ongoing], fractional cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains the administrative correspondence of the executive director of the Historical Commission. According to the executive assistant, the outgoing director did not maintain administrative correspondence files, choosing instead to file letters with the appropriate divisions or programs the topic of the letter concerned. The incoming director, currently serving as the assistant director, is maintaining files of administrative correspondence, containing internal memoranda, correspondence with local and other government officials, the general public and others. These files do concern policies and programs of the agency. Dates of these files are 1998-[ongoing].

Purpose:

The administrative correspondence is created and maintained to document the handling of agency’s functions by the executive director.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The Texas Historical Commission is composed of eighteen members appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the Senate, serving overlapping six-year terms. Members must be citizens of Texas who have demonstrated an interest in the preservation of the state's historical heritage, and represent all geographical areas of Texas. Beginning in 1995, the membership must include a professional archeologist, a professional historian, and a licensed architect; and two of the members must be from counties with populations of less than 50,000. The governor names the chairperson. The members appoint an executive director to administer the agency. In 1998 the commission had a staff of about 100 employees.

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Texas Historical Commission has gone through a recent agency restructuring in which several divisions were combined. The agency now contains seven divisions, which carry out the following responsibilities of the agency.

 

  • The Administration Division oversees budgetary, planning, and other executive functions.
  • Staff Services handles personnel, accounting, and other staff functions.
  • The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Antiquities Code of Texas (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.
  • The Division of Architecture administers architectural grants through the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program, monitors the state’s National Historic Landmarks and reviews proposed changes to Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. It also monitors and provides technical consultation on the restoration and adaptive reuse of the state’s architectural resources.
  • The History Programs Division operates the National Register Program and the Local History Program. This division is compiling a statewide inventory of Texas properties significant in American history, architecture, or culture. It nominates the most significant properties to the National Register of Historic Places. It assists designated cities with developing ordinances and programs to preserve local landmarks and also provides other assistance to county officials, nonprofit heritage organizations, and individuals in preserving cultural and historic resources of the state. It operates the Texas Historical Marker program and administers the Sam Rayburn House Museum in Bonham, Texas.
  • The Community Heritage Division operates the Main Street Program, the Heritage Tourism Program, and the Certified Local Government Program. The Main Street Program was created about 1981 and is designed to revitalize downtown centers of cities with fewer than 50,000 people. The program provides cities with architectural consultation, marketing, and interior design training for this purpose. In 1989 the Legislature provided funding for an Urban Main Street Program. The Heritage Tourism Program works with business communities and with civic and educational organizations to promote and preserve historic sites in heritage areas. The Certified Local Government Program was created in 1980 and offers technical assistance to cities and awards grants to help with the development of quality local preservation programs.
  • The Marketing Communications Division, which now includes the former Publications Division, issues a bimonthly newsletter, The Medallion, and provides production services for other departments, including the production of educational and technical materials concerning archeology, architecture, museum laws, and other topics. It also helps coordinate the agency’s annual museum conference and assists with public outreach.

There are several boards associated with the Texas Historical Commission. The State Board of Review evaluates nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. The Antiquities Advisory Board evaluates nominations for State Archeological Landmark status and considers issues associated with the Antiquities Code of Texas. The Guardians of Texas Preservation Trust Fund cultivates and develops sources for the support for the trust fund and advises the commission of potential donors of property or other assets. The Advisory Board of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund makes recommendations on Trust Fund grant allocations and advises on matters relating to more efficient utilization or enhancement of the fund. The Main Street Interagency Council evaluates applications for the Main Street programs.

Affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission until it was abolished in 1995 was the Texas Antiquities Committee, created by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session (1969This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Topical by program or project name.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: none present prior to 1998

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

A request to destroy several series of records, including some listed as administrative correspondence, was submitted to the State Archivist in 1994 and subsequently approved.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Correspondence — Administrative
Series item number: 1.1.007
Agency item number: 2
Archival code: R
Retention: 3

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

Administrative correspondence of the executive director is generally the highest level correspondence of an agency. Most of the administrative correspondence in this agency is filed with the programs or project files–it is not concentrated in any one spot. Although the correspondence in this series is recent, according to the executive assistant the incoming director will continue to create and maintain executive level correspondence concerning the agency’ policies and programs in this series. This series has been appraised to be archival. The archival code needs to be changed to "A." Once the correspondence for each year has met its retention period, it can be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission. Because this is a recently created series by the commission, we will review the files when received to determine if they correspond to the description of the series provided. If not, we will reappraise the series at that time.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Policies and procedures manuals 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Administration Division

Contact: Marlene Casarez, Executive Assistant
463-5768

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for three years after they are superceded according to the retention schedule. Current holdings of the agency are 1983-[ongoing], fractional cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains copies of rules from all programs operating in the agency and is designed to contain copies of any policy or procedural manuals produced. According to the executive assistant, there are not any procedural manuals at present except for a personnel manual, which is described and contained in another series. Policy changes are presented to the Commission for a vote and are recorded in the minutes. At some point some of the divisions have created handbooks for use by outside personnel to carry out agency programs, such as the Main Street Handbook for city staffs participating in the Main Street Project, or handbook for county historical commissions. If the divisions do produce manuals, they will be listed in this series and filed in the agency’s library along with the handbooks.

For changes made to the administrative rules that administer the Texas Antiquities Code, see the series Rules and regulations, housed in the Archeology Division.

Purpose:

These records are created and maintained to record rule and policy changes in the agency. The series also maintains policy and procedural manuals for staff, and handbooks produced for outside parties, all of which describe how agency programs are to be implemented.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The Texas Historical Commission is composed of eighteen members appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the Senate, serving overlapping six-year terms. The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state historical museum to be built in Austin.

There are several boards associated with the Texas Historical Commission. The State Board of Review evaluates nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. The Antiquities Advisory Board evaluates nominations for State Archeological Landmark status and considers issues associated with the Antiquities Code of Texas. The Guardians of Texas Preservation Trust Fund cultivates and develops sources for the support for the trust fund and advises the commission of potential donors of property or other assets. The Advisory Board of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund makes recommendations on Trust Fund grant allocations and advises on matters relating to more efficient utilization or enhancement of the fund. The Main Street Interagency Council evaluates applications for the Main Street programs.

Affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission until it was abolished in 1995 was the Texas Antiquities Committee, created by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session (1969). This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by division names.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None stated

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records:

Rules of the agency are published in the Texas Register and the Texas Administrative Code.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Policies and procedures manuals
Series item number: 1.1.025
Agency item number: 8
Archival code: R
Retention: US+3

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings

The Mainstreet Handbook and a handbook for county historical commissions are in the Publications Depository.

Appraisal decision:

It is difficult to judge the archival value of this series since one of the main elements it is supposed to contain–internal policy and procedure manuals, apparently have not been created except for a personnel manual which is contained in another series. The rules that are present are published in the Texas Register and in the statutes, so there is not any need to further document the rules. The handbooks described are not designed for use by the agency but for use by the community for which it was created (Main Street programs, county historical commissions, etc.). However, this series as it now exists in the state records retention schedule does include manuals distributed externally which set out the rules, policies, and procedures that govern the projects/programs covered. The handbooks do describe procedures to follow as required by the programs involved and provide an excellent description of the activities of the programs involved. Because of the informational value of the existing handbooks and the possible creation of similar handbooks and internal policy and procedural manuals, this series has been appraised to be archival. Change the "R" code to "A." We do not need copies of the rules sent over here and the current manuals the staff has described to us are on file in the Publications Depository. Copies of any future manuals or handbooks created need to be sent to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

The series title for the series need to change according to the most recent state records retention schedule to: Agency rules, Policies, and Procedures.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Speeches (Exec. Dir.) 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Administration Division

Contact: Marlene Casarez, Executive Assistant
463-5768

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for 2 years according to the retention schedule. Current holdings of the agency are 1980-[ongoing], fractional cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains speeches given by the outgoing executive director, dating from 1980-[ongoing]; and notes and outlines of speeches given by the incoming director, currently serving as the assistant director, dating from 1998-[ongoing]. The speeches are presented at professional meetings, before community groups, etc.; and discuss programs and activities of the Commission.

Purpose:

The speeches by the executive director of the agency discuss various policies and programs of the Historical Commission.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The Texas Historical Commission is composed of eighteen members appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the Senate, serving overlapping six-year terms. The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

There are several boards associated with the Texas Historical Commission. The State Board of Review evaluates nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. The Antiquities Advisory Board evaluates nominations for State Archeological Landmark status and considers issues associated with the Antiquities Code of Texas. The Guardians of Texas Preservation Trust Fund cultivates and develops sources for the support for the trust fund and advises the commission of potential donors of property or other assets. The Advisory Board of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund makes recommendations on Trust Fund grant allocations and advises on matters relating to more efficient utilization or enhancement of the fund. The Main Street Interagency Council evaluates applications for the Main Street programs.

Affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission until it was abolished in 1995 was the Texas Antiquities Committee, created by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session (1969). This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

Also affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission between 1971 and 1983 was the Texas Historical Resources Development Council. The Council promoted communication among its member agencies in their coordinated efforts to develop and publicize the historical resources of Texas.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None present prior to 1980, few present in the 1990s.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Speeches (Exec. Dir.)
Series item number: 1.1.040
Agency item number: 18
Archival code: R
Retention: 2

Archival holdings:

Speeches, 1966-1972, fractional cubic ft.
This is part of a larger accession of records of the Historical Commission, titled in the finding aid as Records, 1960-1981, 5.71 cubic ft.

These are speeches given by the executive director and commission members at events such as historical marker dedications, other historic dedication ceremonies, at meetings of local and county historical associations, civic groups, other agencies, and at conferences. Topics discussed include historical marker dedications and dedication of historic facilities (such as the Sam Rayburn House), functions of the agency, and presentation of awards given by the commission.

Appraisal decision:

The speeches of the executive director of an agency are generally a good source of contemporary concerns of the agency. In the case of the Historical Commission, these concerns also address the history of the state in various ways. Because of the informational value of these speeches this series has been appraised to be archival. Change the "R" code to "A" on the schedule. The agency can transfer at their convenience the older speeches that have fulfilled their retention period and thereafter the speeches yearly as their retention is fulfilled.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: County files 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Administration Division

Contact: Marlene Casarez, Executive Assistant
463-5768

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for AC+7 years according to the retention schedule. Current holdings are 1978-[ongoing], totaling 10 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains convenience copies of letters prepared by divisions for various county projects, brochures and other printed materials about projects in the county or history of the county. Dates covered are 1978-[ongoing]. The divisions in the agency contain project and/or county files that have records concerning the operation of the program in the counties.

Purpose:

The correspondence is created by divisions in the normal course of business with county officials and others concerning county projects. Convenience copies of these letters and various printed items about county projects are maintained by the administrative division to provide informational materials for use when communicating with a county about their programs.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The Texas Historical Commission is composed of eighteen members appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the Senate, serving overlapping six-year terms. The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

Affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission until it was abolished in 1995 was the Texas Antiquities Committee, created by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session (1969). This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None present prior to 1978.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: County files
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 26
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+7

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

This series serves primarily as a reference tool, to provide informational value about programs in the counties when needed by the administrative offices. Files documenting the Commission’s programs are filed in various other series, under the program name or in a county file within the divisions. The correspondence filed in this series is a convenience copy, with the originals filed with the program files. This series has no evidential value and little informational value, which can be obtained elsewhere in the archival records of the agency, so this series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks section - "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: State agencies 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Administration Division

Contact: Marlene Casarez, Executive Assistant
463-5768

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for AC+7, according to the retention schedule. Current holdings are 1980-[ongoing], totaling 10 cubic ft.

Description:

This series consists of generally routine correspondence with state agencies, discussing budgets, Texas Register posting, building and general maintenance, meeting notices, and other similar routine issues. Any letters with agencies concerning specific projects or programs are filed in the program files within the divisions, and letters with copies also directed to the executive director are also filed here. Dates covered are 1980-[ongoing].

Purpose:

This correspondence is created and maintained in the conduct of agency interaction with state agencies, mostly concerning routine operations.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The Texas Historical Commission is composed of eighteen members appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the Senate, serving overlapping six-year terms. The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

Affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission until it was abolished in 1995 was the Texas Antiquities Committee, created by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session (1969). This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by state agency.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None present prior to 1980.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: State agencies
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 27
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+7

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents the agency’s interaction with other state agencies. According to the executive assistant this is a fairly routine correspondence series, which should be listed as Correspondence, general, on the next retention schedule, with the series item number 1.1.008. Any correspondence of significance to program activities or projects is filed in the divisions in their program files, most of which we have appraised to be archival. Because this series offers little unique information, this series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks section - "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Commission members - Official

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Administration Division

Contact: Marlene Casarez, Executive Assistant
463-5768

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency permanently, according to the retention schedule. Current holdings are c. 1970-[ongoing], comprising about 4 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains appointment letters, biographical information, vouchers, clippings, and some routine correspondence with members of the Historical Commission. Dates covered are c. 1970-[ongoing]. Files are present for both current and past members of the Historical Commission. The correspondence present in the members files is fairly general–meeting notices and similar letters. However, the chairman’s files contain often extensive correspondence on significant issues and policies. According to the executive assistant, correspondence between the executive director or other staff is usually with the chairman, thus his files are fairly substantial.

Purpose:

These records provide biographical and other data about members of the Historical Commission and track communication with the members, most notably with the chairman, so the members are aware of upcoming meetings and issues of concern to the agency.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The Texas Historical Commission is composed of eighteen members appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the Senate, serving overlapping six-year terms. Members must be citizens of Texas who have demonstrated an interest in the preservation of the state's historical heritage, and represent all geographical areas of Texas. Beginning in 1995, the membership must include a professional archeologist, a professional historian, and a licensed architect; and two of the members must be from counties with populations of less than 50,000. The governor names the chairperson. The members appoint an executive director to administer the agency. In 1998 the commission had a staff of about 100 employees.

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

There are several boards associated with the Texas Historical Commission. The State Board of Review evaluates nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. The Antiquities Advisory Board evaluates nominations for State Archeological Landmark status and considers issues associated with the Antiquities Code of Texas. The Guardians of Texas Preservation Trust Fund cultivates and develops sources for the support for the trust fund and advises the commission of potential donors of property or other assets. The Advisory Board of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund makes recommendations on Trust Fund grant allocations and advises on matters relating to more efficient utilization or enhancement of the fund. The Main Street Interagency Council evaluates applications for the Main Street programs.

Affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission until it was abolished in 1995 was the Texas Antiquities Committee, created by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session (1969). This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by member.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: Records are not present for early members the Texas State Historical Survey Committee according to the staff.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Commission members — Official
Series item number: 1.1
Agency item number: 11
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

This series contains information about and correspondence with the members of the Historical Commission. Much of the information in the member’s files is routine–travel vouchers, letters of appointment, vitae, and meeting notices. Some members have some additional correspondence, which may discuss agency programs, policies, or projects. However, the chairman’s files contain significant correspondence, which does discuss important issues, policies, and programs. Because of the significance of the chairmen’s files in documenting the functioning of the commission, this series has been appraised to be archival. Add an archival code of "A" to the schedule and change the retention period to AV–administratively valuable. The Library and Archives Commission will retain the files of the chairmen. The agency needs to transfer the oldest non-current chairmen’s files to the Archives and Information Services Division now, and transfer files of recent chairs when the files cease to have frequent administrative use. Files of the members of the Antiquities Committee have already been transferred to the Library and Archives Commission.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Meeting files of Trust Fund associated boards 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Division of Architecture

Contact: Abby Wood
463-8821

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency permanently. Current holdings date from 1989-[ongoing], consisting of about 2.25 cubic ft.

Description:

These are meeting agendas, minutes, correspondence with board members, and supporting documentation from meetings of the Advisory Board of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund, the Guardians of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund, and the Architecture Committee of the Texas Historical Commission, dating from 1989-[ongoing]. The bulk of the materials concern the two Trust Fund boards. The Architecture Committee is composed of members of the Historical Commission, which oversees architectural related activities of the agency. According to agency staff, the record copies of the minutes of the Architecture Committee are filed with the minutes of the Texas Historical Commission.

Purpose:

These files document the actions taken by two boards developed to assist the Historical Commission with Texas Preservation Trust Fund grants and sources for grant funds. The records of the Architecture Committee also document oversight activities of the Division of Architecture by the Historical Commission.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Division of Architecture administers architectural grants through the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program, monitors the state’s National Historic Landmarks and reviews proposed changes to Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. It also monitors and provides technical consultation on the restoration and adaptive reuse of the state’s architectural resources.

The Texas Preservation Trust Fund was created in 1989 by the 71st Legislature to provide a stable source of funding for preservation of landmarks throughout the state. The goal of the program is to support property owners in the preservation of historic and archeological landmarks that would otherwise be lost. There are two boards that assist the Historical Commission with its trust fund activities. The Advisory Board of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund consists of professionals appointed by the Texas Historical Commission to make recommendations on trust fund grant projects and to advise the Commission on matters relating to more efficient utilization or enhancement of the trust fund. The Guardians of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund is a group of distinguished Texans appointed by the Historical Commission to cultivate and develop sources of support for the trust fund, and to advise the Commission of possible donors of property or other assets. These members also serve as spokespersons and ambassadors to local political and public organizations.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Arranged by board, then chronologically.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Meeting agenda and minutes
Series item number: 1.1.058
Agency item number: 3
Archival code: A
Retention: PM

Title: Meeting supporting documentation
Series item number: 1.1.062
Agency item number: 9
Archival code: A
Retention: 2

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

These files document the decisions made by two boards concerning the application of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund. This fund is a significant source of grant funding for property owners to help with the preservation of historical and archeological resources. This series has evidential value by documenting the decisions made by the boards both regarding the issuance of grants and the most effective utilization of the fund. These series will remain as archival.

Copies of the minutes and agenda for all past meetings need to be sent to the Library and Archives Commission at the agency’s earliest convenience. Minutes and agenda for future meetings can be sent yearly or shortly after each meeting, whichever is easiest. The meeting supporting documentation for the earlier years (through 1995) can be sent now, with the remainder sent when it ceases to have frequent administrative use. Although the meeting files consist of two series on the schedule, they are all filed together in one series. These need to be listed on the schedule as two series, because each of those series has a different retention period. I recommend renaming the series Meeting agenda and minutes of Trust Fund Associated Boards, and Meeting supporting documentation of Trust Fund Associated boards, so as to distinguish them from similar series on the retention schedule.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Agency building plans and specifications 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Division of Architecture

Contact: Abby Wood
463-8821

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: one cubic ft.

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for the life of the asset. The agency does not know the dates of the earliest records but continues to maintain all the records in this series. Files comprise ten cubic ft.

Description:

This series consists of plans and specifications for renovation projects to five historic buildings of the Historical Commission, which are the Gethsemane Lutheran Church, Luther Hall, Carrington-Covert House, the Elrose Apartments, and the Christianson-Leberman Building. The beginning dates of this series are unknown–the series is ongoing. The original building plans and drawings for the buildings are not present. The commission owns all the buildings except the Elrose Apartments, which are owned by the General Services Commission.

Building drawings and historical documentation of the Christianson-Leberman building is maintained by the Community Heritage Development Division, see the series Building construction — Project files (Christianson-Leberman complex).

Purpose:

These records are created for the administration and maintenance of these historic agency buildings and are used as a reference source for future projects.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Division of Architecture administers architectural grants through the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program, monitors the state’s National Historic Landmarks and reviews proposed changes to Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. It also monitors and provides technical consultation on the restoration and adaptive reuse of the state’s architectural resources.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: By building.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

The General Services Commission may have copies, especially of the Elrose Apartments since they own those apartments.

Publications based on records: No

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Agency building plans and specifications
Series item number: 5.2.003
Agency item number: 12
Archival code: R
Retention: LA

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents changes made to historic buildings owned/and or utilized as offices by the Historical Commission. The original building plans for these buildings are not present, but changes made to them are filed in this series. Because these are historic structures owned by the state, these materials need to be retained. This series has been appraised to be archival. The archival code needs to be changed to A. The materials can remain at the agency as long as the agency uses the buildings. If the agency ceases use of the buildings in the future and they still remain state property, these materials should be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Texas Preservation Trust Fund Program, development documentation 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Division of Architecture

Contact: Abby Wood
463-8821

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency until purpose served. Current holdings of the agency date from 1988-[ongoing], totaling 12 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains meeting documentation, board member files, rules and regulations, legislation, fundraising materials, publicity files and other background information concerning the development of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund. Dates covered are 1988-[ongoing]. It also contains fundraising files compiled by the former development director and documentation of ongoing fundraising efforts.

Meeting files for the Advisory Board of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund and for the Guardians of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund can be found in the series, Meeting files of Trust Fund associated boards.

Purpose:

These records are the research and development work of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund and ongoing fundraising activities for the fund.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Division of Architecture administers architectural grants through the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program, monitors the state’s National Historic Landmarks and reviews proposed changes to Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. It also monitors and provides technical consultation on the restoration and adaptive reuse of the state’s architectural resources.

The Texas Preservation Trust Fund was created in 1989 by the 71st Legislature to provide a stable source of funding for preservation of landmarks throughout the state. The goal of the program is to support property owners in the preservation of historic and archeological landmarks that would otherwise be lost. There are two boards that assist the Historical Commission with its trust fund activities. The Advisory Board of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund consists of professionals appointed by the Texas Historical Commission to make recommendations on trust fund grant projects and to advise the Commission on matters relating to more efficient utilization or enhancement of the trust fund. The Guardians of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund is a group of distinguished Texans appointed by the Historical Commission to cultivate and develop sources of support for the trust fund, and to advise the Commission of possible donors of property or other assets. These members also serve as spokespersons and ambassadors to local political and public organizations.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Topical

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Texas Preservation Trust Fund Program, development documentation
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 19
Archival code: R
Retention: PS

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

These materials document the development and functioning of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund. This fund is a significant source of grant funding for property owners to help with the preservation of historical and archeological resources. While some of the information here is significant because it covers the development and legislation regarding the fund, the meeting files of the two boards that help the Historical Commission to administer the fund are archival and provide sufficient documentation of this trust fund. Meeting minutes and supporting documentation is present in the meeting files of the associated boards, see the series review for Meeting files of Trust Fund Associated Boards . Also, any major legislative or rule changes will be addressed in the statutes of the commission and discussed in the annual report of the agency. This series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks section - "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Architectural awards files 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Division of Architecture

Contact: Abby Wood
463-8821

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for ten years according to the retention schedule. Actual holdings of the agency are from 1985-[ongoing], comprising about 0.33 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains nominations and materials documenting the selection of recipients for the agency’s annual architectural awards. Dates are 1985-[ongoing]. Each year the agency presents awards to architects who have done an outstanding job on renovation projects involving historic structures.

Purpose:

These records are created in the process of nominating and selectioning recipients of the agency’s annual architectural awards.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Division of Architecture administers architectural grants through the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program, monitors the state’s National Historic Landmarks and reviews proposed changes to Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. It also monitors and provides technical consultation on the restoration and adaptive reuse of the state’s architectural resources.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None known

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Architectural awards files
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 25
Archival code: R
Retention: 10

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

These files document individuals who have received an architectural award from the Historical Commission. While this is a notable honor for the architect the nomination forms and accompanying records do not require permanent retention. Mention of the winners is generally made in the annual report and/or the minutes of the Commission. This series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks section - "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Endangered Historic Properties Needs Assessment Files 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Division of Architecture

Contact: Abby Wood
463-8821

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency until purpose served according to the retention schedule. Current holdings of the agency are 1987-[ongoing], totaling four cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains needs assessment forms, photographs, and historical information gathered on historic buildings initially for the book Endangered Historic Properties, and on properties determined as endangered since the last edition of the book was published in 1991. Dates covered are 1987-[ongoing]. This study was undertaken to document the most threatened historic properties in the state, some of which have since been demolished. In recent years the agency lists the ten most endangered properties in their biennial report to the legislature.

Purpose:

These records identify and document endangered historic properties in the state.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Division of Architecture administers architectural grants through the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program, monitors the state’s National Historic Landmarks and reviews proposed changes to Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. It also monitors and provides technical consultation on the restoration and adaptive reuse of the state’s architectural resources.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records:

Endangered Historic Properties, Texas Historical Commission, 1989, and 1991.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Endangered Historic Properties Needs Assessment files
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 26
Archival code: R
Retention: PS

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

This series contains information about endangered historic properties in the state. Although some of the information has been published, none has since 1991 except for a listing of properties in the biennial report of the agency, and future publication of the data is unknown. This series contains informational value about these properties, which have historic significance, especially since some of the properties have since been destroyed. This series has been appraised to be archival. Change the archival code to "A" on the schedule and change the retention period to AV–administratively valuable. A note can be added to the Remarks section as follows: "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: County courthouse reviews/files 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Division of Architecture

Contact: Abby Wood
463-8821

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: about one cubic ft.

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency permanently. Current holdings date from 1970-[ongoing] and comprise 50 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains correspondence, plans, maps, drawings, photographs, historical information, and architectural reviews, etc., dating 1970-[ongoing]. This series documents historic county courthouses in Texas through county courthouse reviews and the Texas Courthouse Alliance project, and documents any alterations made to the historic courthouses designated as Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks (RTHL) and/or which are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Building and construction plans of the structures can be found in the series County courthouse files — plans/maps/drawings. Applications designating the courthouses as RTHL or the nominations for placement on the National Register of Historic Places are contained in the History Programs Division, largely in the series Marker files and the series National Register Project files. Duplicate correspondence is also filed in several series containing information on Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks and on the National Register of Historic Places, maintained by the History Programs Division of the agency.

Purpose:

These records are created and maintained to provide historical data about the courthouses in Texas counties through the activities of the Texas Courthouse Alliance project, county courthouse reviews, and to record changes made to historic county courthouses designated as historic landmarks.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Division of Architecture administers architectural grants through the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program, monitors the state’s National Historic Landmarks and reviews proposed changes to Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. It also monitors and provides technical consultation on the restoration and adaptive reuse of the state’s architectural resources through projects such as the Texas Courthouse Alliance. The Texas Courthouse Alliance is a project to document 55 of the oldest courthouses in Texas to ensure that key architectural and historical information related to these buildings will not be lost.

Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks are properties that have been designated by the State Marker Review Board as particularly significant in the architectural history of the state. This is a permanent designation and cannot be transferred to another structure. The exterior appearances of RTHL buildings are to retain their historical integrity after designation. Any architectural or structural changes to be made to these buildings are to be reviewed by the Division of Architecture for compliance with the provisions of V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442, Section 442.006(f). If appreciable or unwarranted changes are observed to have been made to a landmark structure, the designation and marker may be withdrawn by the State Marker Review Board. The State Marker Review Board is composed of members of the Texas Historical Commission and determines which properties receive historical markers and/or Records Texas Historic Landmark status.

The National Register of Historic Places was established in 1966 through passage of the National Historic Preservation Act. The register serves as a federal listing of buildings, sites, structures, districts, and objects that meet one or more of the criteria defined in 36 CFR Part 60.4. If a site is eligible, a form is completed and submitted for nomination. Once nominated, the form is reviewed by the National Register Department, then by the State Board of Review for formal consideration. If passed, it is submitted to the Keeper of the National Register for final approval and listing. The first listing of Texas properties in the register was in October 1969.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps:

Files are not present for all counties and none are present prior to 1970.

Problems:

The agency is running out of space to store this massive amount of information.

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: County courthouse reviews/files
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 22A
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

There is a significant amount of historical information in this series documenting some of Texas’ best known landmarks–its county courthouses. Because of the historical importance of documenting these buildings and the informational value in these files, this series has been appraised to be archival. Add an "A" code to the retention schedule and change the retention period to AV–administratively valuable. A note can be added to the Remarks section as follows: "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission." This division has stated it is running out of space for this series so they can transfer the older records to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission now.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: [County courthouse files — ] Plans/maps/drawings

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Division of Architecture

Contact: Abby Wood
463-8821

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: six cubic ft.

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for 45 years after completion of the project, according to the retention schedule. Current holdings of the agency are from 1970-[ongoing], with 20 drawers of flat files stored at the agency and about 60 sets of rolled plans housed at the Architecture Library of the University of Texas at Austin, comprising about 65 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains copies of original building plans and construction plans of county courthouses in Texas and any alterations made to them. Dates covered are 1970-[ongoing]. This series documents historic county courthouses in Texas through county courthouse reviews and the Texas Courthouse Alliance project, and documents any alterations made to the historic courthouses designated as Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks and/or which are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Architectural reviews, correspondence, photographs and historical information about the structures can be found in the series County courthouse reviews/files.

Applications designating the courthouses as RTHL or the nominations for placement on the National Register of Historic Places are contained in the History Programs Division, largely in the series Marker files and the series National Register Project files. Duplicate correspondence is also filed in several series containing information on Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks and on the National Register of Historic Places, maintained by the History Programs Division of the agency.

Purpose:

These records are created and maintained to provide historical data about the courthouses in Texas counties through the activities of the Texas Courthouse Alliance project, county courthouse reviews, and to record changes made to historic county courthouses designated as historic landmarks.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Division of Architecture administers architectural grants through the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program, monitors the state’s National Historic Landmarks and reviews proposed changes to Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. It also monitors and provides technical consultation on the restoration and adaptive reuse of the state’s architectural resources through projects such as the Texas Courthouse Alliance. The Texas Courthouse Alliance is a project to document 55 of the oldest courthouses in Texas to ensure that key architectural and historical information related to these buildings will not be lost.

Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks are properties that have been designated by the State Marker Review Board as particularly significant in the architectural history of the state. This is a permanent designation and cannot be transferred to another structure. The exterior appearances of RTHL buildings are to retain their historical integrity after designation. Any architectural or structural changes to be made to these buildings are to be reviewed by the Division of Architecture for compliance with the provisions of V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442, Section 442.006(f). If appreciable or unwarranted changes are observed to have been made to a landmark structure, the designation and marker may be withdrawn by the State Marker Review Board. The State Marker Review Board is composed of members of the Texas Historical Commission and determines which properties receive historical markers and/or Records Texas Historic Landmark status.

The National Register of Historic Places was established in 1966 through passage of the National Historic Preservation Act. The register serves as a federal listing of buildings, sites, structures, districts, and objects that meet one or more of the criteria defined in 36 CFR Part 60.4. If a site is eligible, a form is completed and submitted for nomination. Once nominated, the form is reviewed by the National Register Department, then by the State Board of Review for formal consideration. If passed, it is submitted to the Keeper of the National Register for final approval and listing. The first listing of Texas properties in the register was in October 1969.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps:

Files are not present for all counties and none are present prior to 1970.

Problems:

The agency is running out of space to store this massive amount of information.

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Plans/maps/drawings
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 22B
Archival code: none
Retention: AC+45

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

There is a significant amount of historical information in this series documenting some of Texas’ best known landmarks–its county courthouses. Because of the historical importance of documenting these buildings and the informational value in these files, this series has been appraised to be archival. Add an "A" code to the retention schedule and change the retention period to AV–administratively valuable. A note can be added to the Remarks section as follows: "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission." This division has stated it is running out of space for this series so they can transfer the older records to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission now.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: State grant files — Texas Historic Preservation Grant Program and/or plans/maps/drawings 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Division of Architecture

Contact: Abby Wood
463-8821

Obsolete record series? Yes
Replaced by: Texas Preservation Grant Fund Program and Texas Preservation Grant Fund Program — Plans/maps/drawings

Ongoing record series? No
Annual accumulation:

Agency holdings:

The paper records are retained by the agency for 45 years after completion of the project; the microfiche records are retained permanently. Current holdings date from 1982-1992. About 1 cubic ft. of records is held at the agency, 25 cubic ft. stored at the State Records Center, and the microfiche is housed in the agency’s library.

Description:

This series contains grant applications, photographs, correspondence, grant reports, and plans concerning building projects requesting funds from the Texas Historic Preservation Grant Program. Dates covered are 1982-1992. Microfiche of these files is available in the library of the Historical Commission.

The Historic Preservation Grant Program was developed in 1981 to provide financial assistance to nonprofit organizations and political subdivisions of the state that were carrying out, planning, acquiring, or developing projects involving historic structures. Eligible buildings included Recorded Texas Historic Landmark designated properties, historic county courthouses, and buildings listed on the National Register. State grant funding is now made available through the Texas Preservation Grant Fund Program. See the series Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program and the series Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program — Plans/maps/drawings for records concerning grants awarded through this program.

Purpose:

These records are created and maintained to administer the Texas Historic Preservation Grant Program. Also, if future changes are requested for these structures, the architectural review staff pulls the files to review the changes already made to the structures.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Division of Architecture administers architectural grants through the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program, monitors the state’s National Historic Landmarks and reviews proposed changes to Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. It also monitors and provides technical consultation on the restoration and adaptive reuse of the state’s architectural resources.

The Texas Preservation Trust Fund was created in 1989 (Senate Bill 294, 71st Legislature) to provide a stable source of funding for preservation of landmarks throughout the state. The goal of the program is to support property owners in the preservation of historic and archeological landmarks that would otherwise be lost. There are two boards that assist the Historical Commission with its trust fund activities. The Advisory Board of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund consists of professionals appointed by the Texas Historical Commission to make recommendations on trust fund grant projects and to advise the Commission on matters relating to more efficient utilization or enhancement of the trust fund. The Guardians of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund is a group of distinguished Texans appointed by the Historical Commission to cultivate and develop sources of support for the trust fund, and to advise the Commission of possible donors of property or other assets. These members also serve as spokespersons and ambassadors to local political and public organizations.

An earlier grant project was the Historic Preservation Grant Program. This program was developed in 1981 to provide financial assistance to nonprofit organizations and political subdivisions of the state that were carrying out, planning, acquiring, or developing projects involving historic structures. Eligible buildings included Recorded Texas Historic Landmark designated properties, historic county courthouses, and buildings listed on the National Register. State grant funding is now made available through the Texas Preservation Grant Fund Program.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county within each year.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? An index at the agency provides access to projects.

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records:

Grant project reports were printed and made available for distribution.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: State grant files — Texas Historic Preservation Grant Program and/or plans/maps/drawings [paper]
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 23A
Archival code: none
Retention: AC+45

Title: State grant files — Texas Historic Preservation Grant Program [microfiche]
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 23B
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:

Preservation grant reports, 1981-1983, 2 cubic ft.
These are historic preservation grant project completion reports of various historic properties, including the Elisabet Ney Studio, county courthouses, old homes, churches, homesteads, and a railroad depot. Dates of the reports are 1981-1983. Unprocessed. These reports contain a narrative of the renovation work done, copies of deed restrictions, a fiscal report for the project, and photographs and/or slides of the facility, including views prior to, during, and after the construction was completed. Some of the slides and photographs may be missing from the reports.

Preservation grant reports, 1984-1985, 1 cubic ft.
These are preservation grant project completion reports from all county courthouses. Dates of the reports are 1984-1985. Unprocessed. These reports contain a narrative of the renovation work done, copies of deed restrictions, a fiscal report for the project, and photographs and/or slides of the facility, including views prior to, during, and after the construction was completed.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

Several reports are present, dated in 1984-1985. These will shortly be transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division.

Appraisal decision:

These records document work done on historic structures through Historic Preservation Fund Grants and do provide a good historical record of some historic structures. The information present in the records is valuable. However, it is present in two formats–paper and microfiche. And, many of the project reports have already been sent to the Archives and Information Services Division. These reports provide a good overview of the project, providing narrative and visual documentation of the renovation work done of these historic structures. The paper series has been appraised to be archival. Change the retention period to AV–administratively valuable. Because these paper files are already in storage, the agency should transfer them to the Archives and Information Services Division at their earliest convenience. The Archives will retain the reports, photographs, and drawings/plans of the properties maintained in that series. The microfiche series can remain as it is and be maintained at the agency.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Federal grant files — Historic Preservation Fund Grants-in-Aid and/or plans/maps/drawings 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Division of Architecture

Contact: Abby Wood
463-8821

Obsolete record series? Yes
Replaced by: Texas Preservation Grant Fund Program and Texas Preservation Grant Fund
Program — Plans/maps/drawings

Ongoing record series? No
Annual accumulation:

Agency holdings:

The paper records are retained by the agency for 45 years after completion of the project; the microfiche records are retained permanently. Current holdings date from 1971-1984, with 28 cubic ft. stored at the State Records Center, and the microfiche housed in the agency’s library.

Description:

This series contains grant applications, photographs, correspondence, grant reports, and plans for building projects requesting funds from the Historic Preservation Fund Grants-in-Aid program. Dates covered are 1971-1984. Microfiche of these files is available in the library of the Historical Commission.

The Historic Preservation Fund Grants-in-Aid Program was a federal matching grants program established as part of the National Historic Preservation Act to provide funding to private individuals, partnerships, or corporations that were surveying, planning, acquiring, or developing projects involving historic structures or archeological sites. Historic structures or archeological sites had to have been listed on the National Register of Historic Places in order to be eligible to receive grant funding. According to agency staff, federal funding is not currently available for projects of this sort.

Purpose:

These records are created and maintained to administer the federal Historic Preservation Grants-in-Aid Program. Also, if future changes are requested for these structures, the architectural review staff will pull the files to review changes already made to the structures.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Division of Architecture administers architectural grants through the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program, monitors the state’s National Historic Landmarks and reviews proposed changes to Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. It also monitors and provides technical consultation on the restoration and adaptive reuse of the state’s architectural resources.

The Historic Preservation Fund Grants-in-Aid Program was a federal matching grants program established as part of the National Historic Preservation Act to provide funding to private individuals, partnerships, or corporations that were surveying, planning, acquiring, or developing projects involving historic structures or archeological sites. Historic structures or archeological sites had to have been listed on the National Register of Historic Places in order to be eligible to receive grant funding.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county within year.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? An index is available at the agency to provide access to the projects.

Gaps: No records are present prior to 1971 or after 1984.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: Unknown

Publications based on records:

Reports were prepared but may not have been published or widely distributed.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Federal grant files — Historic Preservation Fund Grants-in-Aid and/or plans/maps/drawings [paper]
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 24A
Archival code: none
Retention: AC+45

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Federal Grant files — Historic Preservation [microfiche]
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 24B
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

None located in the collection.

Appraisal decision:

These records document work done on historic structures through the federal Historic Preservation Fund Grants-in-Aid program and do provide a good historical record of some historic structures. The information present in the records is valuable. However, it is present in two formats–paper and microfiche. The grant reports provide a good overview of the project, providing narrative and visual documentation of the renovation work undertaken with these historic structures. The paper series has been appraised to be archival. Change the retention period to AV–administratively valuable. Because these paper files are already in storage, the agency should transfer them to the Archives and Information Services Division at their earliest convenience. The Archives will retain the reports, photographs, and drawings/plans of the properties maintained in that series. The microfiche series can remain as it is and be maintained at the agency.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Division of Architecture

Contact: Abby Wood
463-8821

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: two cubic ft.

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for 45 years after completion of the project. Current holdings date from 1997-[ongoing], totaling six cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains grant applications, photographs, correspondence, and grant reports for building projects requesting funds from the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program. Dates covered are 1997-[ongoing]. For plans and drawings of the structures, see the series Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program — plans/maps/drawings.

Earlier state grant funding was available through the Texas Historic Preservation Grant Program, which has been replaced by the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program. For records of earlier state funding of grant projects see the series State grant files — Texas Historic Preservation Grant Program and/or plans/maps/drawings.

Purpose:

These records are created and maintained to administer the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program. Also, if future changes are requested for these structures, the architectural review staff will pull the files to review changes already made to the structures.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Division of Architecture administers architectural grants through the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program, monitors the state’s National Historic Landmarks and reviews proposed changes to Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. It also monitors and provides technical consultation on the restoration and adaptive reuse of the state’s architectural resources.

The Texas Preservation Trust Fund was created in 1989 by the 71st Legislature to provide a stable source of funding for preservation of landmarks throughout the state. The goal of the program is to support property owners in the preservation of historic and archeological landmarks that would otherwise be lost. There are two boards that assist the Historical Commission with its trust fund activities. The Advisory Board of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund consists of professionals appointed by the Texas Historical Commission to make recommendations on trust fund grant projects and to advise the Commission on matters relating to more efficient utilization or enhancement of the trust fund. The Guardians of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund is a group of distinguished Texans appointed by the Historical Commission to cultivate and develop sources of support for the trust fund, and to advise the Commission of possible donors of property or other assets. These members also serve as spokespersons and ambassadors to local political and public organizations.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county within year.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? Index and database at the agency.

Gaps: None present prior to 1997.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records:

Project completion reports are produced, but may not be printed or widely distributed.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 27A
Archival code: none
Retention: AC+45

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

None located in the collection.

Appraisal decision:

These records document work done on historic structures through the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program and do provide a good historical record of some historic structures. The information present in the records is valuable. The grant reports provide a good overview of the project, providing narrative and visual documentation of the work it entailed. The series has been appraised to be archival. Change the retention period to AV–administratively valuable. When the agency ceases to have regular research or administrative use of the records, they should transfer them to the Archives and Information Services Division. The Archives will retain the reports, photographs, and plans of the structures. In the meantime, the agency should send copies of the reports to either the Publications Depository (if these are printed reports) or to the Archives and Information Services Division (if these reports contain original materials, such as photographs).

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Records Series Review
Series Title: [Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program —] Plans/maps/drawings 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Division of Architecture

Contact: Abby Wood
463-8821

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: several inches.

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for 45 years after completion of the project. Current holdings date from 1997-[ongoing], totaling six cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains plans and drawings for building projects requesting funds from the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program. Dates covered are 1997-[ongoing]. For grant application files and project reports see the series Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program.

Earlier state grant funding was available through the Texas Historic Preservation Grant Program, which has been replaced by the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program. For records of earlier state funding of grant projects see the series State grant files — Texas Historic Preservation Grant Program and/or plans/maps/drawings.

Purpose:

These records are created and maintained to administer the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program. Also, if future changes are requested for these structures, the architectural review staff will pull the files to review changes already made to the structures.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Division of Architecture administers architectural grants through the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program, monitors the state’s National Historic Landmarks and reviews proposed changes to Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. It also monitors and provides technical consultation on the restoration and adaptive reuse of the state’s architectural resources.

The Texas Preservation Trust Fund was created in 1989 by the 71st Legislature to provide a stable source of funding for preservation of landmarks throughout the state. The goal of the program is to support property owners in the preservation of historic and archeological landmarks that would otherwise be lost. There are two boards that assist the Historical Commission with its trust fund activities. The Advisory Board of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund consists of professionals appointed by the Texas Historical Commission to make recommendations on trust fund grant projects and to advise the Commission on matters relating to more efficient utilization or enhancement of the trust fund. The Guardians of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund is a group of distinguished Texans appointed by the Historical Commission to cultivate and develop sources of support for the trust fund, and to advise the Commission of possible donors of property or other assets. These members also serve as spokespersons and ambassadors to local political and public organizations.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county within year.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? Index and database at the agency.

Gaps: None present prior to 1997.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records:

Project completion reports are produced, but may not be printed or widely distributed.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Plans/maps/drawings
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 27B
Archival code: none
Retention: AC+45

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

None located in the collection.

Appraisal decision:

These records correlate to records in the series Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program and document work done on historic structures through the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program, providing a good historical record of some historic structures. The information present in the records is valuable. The grant reports provide a good overview of the project, providing narrative and visual documentation of the work entailed. The series has been appraised to be archival. Change the retention period to AV–administratively valuable. When the agency ceases to have regular research or administrative use of the records, they should transfer them to the Archives and Information Services Division. The Archives will retain the plans and drawings of the structures.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Recorded Texas Historic Landmark Reviews 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Division of Architecture

Contact: Abby Wood
463-8821

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for 45 years after completion of the project. Current holdings of the agency date from 1982-[ongoing] and total about 2 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains correspondence, photographs, reviews and other materials relating to the architectural review of changes made to buildings listed as Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. Plans and drawings associated with these reviews are filed in the series Texas Historic Landmarks — Plans/maps/drawings. Duplicate correspondence is filed in the series Marker files, housed in the History Programs Division.

Purpose:

These records are during the architectural review process and are maintained to record changes made to structures designated as Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Division of Architecture administers architectural grants through the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program, monitors the state’s National Historic Landmarks and reviews proposed changes to Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. It also monitors and provides technical consultation on the restoration and adaptive reuse of the state’s architectural resources.

Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks are properties that have been designated by the State Marker Review Board as particularly significant in the architectural history of the state. This is a permanent designation and cannot be transferred to another structure. The exterior appearances of RTHL buildings are to retain their historical integrity after designation. Any architectural or structural changes to be made to these buildings are to be reviewed by the Division of Architecture for compliance with the provisions of V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442, Section 442.006(f). If appreciable or unwarranted changes are observed to have been made to a landmark structure, the designation and marker may be withdrawn by the State Marker Review Board. The State Marker Review Board is composed of members of the Texas Historical Commission and determines which properties receive historical markers and/or Recorded Texas Historic Landmark status.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps:

No records present in this series prior to 1982, earlier files relating to these facilities can be found in the marker files housed in the History Programs Division.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: Unknown

Publications based on records:

Historical markers and Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks granted each biennium are listed in the biennial report of the agency.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Recorded Texas Historic Landmark Reviews
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 28A
Archival code: none
Retention: AC+45

Archival holdings:

None present in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents changes made to structures designated as Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. This landmark status is the highest Texas can award to a historical structure and awarding of this status requires the agency to review and approve any architectural changes to these buildings. Even though some of the correspondence is duplicated in the marker files in the History Programs Division, the remaining materials document more thoroughly the actual changes made to the structures. Because of the statutory necessity for documenting any changes to these historic structures and the historic value of these structures to their local communities and the state, this series has been appraised to be archival. An archival code of "A" needs to be added to the retention schedule for this series and the retention period changed to "AV"–administratively valuable. A note can be added to the Remarks section as follows: "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: [Texas Historic Landmarks —] Plans/maps/drawings 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Division of Architecture

Contact: Abby Wood
463-8821

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for 45 years after completion of the project. Current holdings of the agency date from 1982-[ongoing] and total about 2 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains plans and drawings relating to the architectural review of changes made to buildings listed as Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. Reviews, correspondence, and photographs associated with these materials are filed in the series Recorded Texas Historic Landmark Reviews.

Purpose:

These records are created and maintained as changes are made to structures designated as Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Division of Architecture administers architectural grants through the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program, monitors the state’s National Historic Landmarks and reviews proposed changes to Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. It also monitors and provides technical consultation on the restoration and adaptive reuse of the state’s architectural resources.

Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks are properties that have been designated by the State Marker Review Board as particularly significant in the architectural history of the state. This is a permanent designation and cannot be transferred to another structure. The exterior appearances of RTHL buildings are to retain their historical integrity after designation. Any architectural or structural changes to be made to these buildings are to be reviewed by the Division of Architecture for compliance with the provisions of V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442, Section 442.006(f). If appreciable or unwarranted changes are observed to have been made to a landmark structure, the designation and marker may be withdrawn by the State Marker Review Board. The State Marker Review Board is composed of members of the Texas Historical Commission and determines which properties receive historical markers and/or Recorded Texas Historic Landmark status.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps:

No records present in this series prior to 1982, earlier files relating to these facilities can be found in the marker files housed in the History Programs Division.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: Unknown

Publications based on records: None according to the agency.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Plans/maps/drawings
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 28B
Archival code: none
Retention: AC+45

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents changes made to structures designated as Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. This landmark status is the highest Texas can award to a historical structure and awarding of this status requires the agency to review and approve any architectural changes to these buildings. Because of the statutory necessity for documenting any changes to these historic structures and the historic value of these structures to their local communities and the state, this series has been appraised to be archival. An archival code of "A" needs to be added to the retention schedule for this series and the retention period changed to "AV"–administratively valuable. A note can be added to the Remarks section as follows: "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: National Register of Historic Places Reviews

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Division of Architecture

Contact: Abby Wood
463-8821

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for 45 years after completion of the project. Current holdings of the agency date from 1982-[ongoing], totaling about 2 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains correspondence, photographs, reviews and other materials relating to the architectural review of changes made to buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Plans and drawings associated with these reviews are filed in the series National Register of Historic Places — Plans/maps/drawings. Duplicate correspondence is filed in the National Register files (there are several series, see the listing below), housed in the History Programs Division.

Files containing the applications and associated materials requesting listing of a structure or building on the National Register of Historic Places are housed in the History Programs Division, see the series National Register project files. Additional National Register series in the History Programs Division are National Register supplemental documentation, County files [preliminary National Register files], and Historical resources slide files.

Purpose:

These records are created during the architectural review process and are maintained to record changes made to buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Division of Architecture administers architectural grants through the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program, monitors the state’s National Historic Landmarks and reviews proposed changes to Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. It also monitors and provides technical consultation on the restoration and adaptive reuse of the state’s architectural resources.

The National Register of Historic Places was established in 1966 through passage of the National Historic Preservation Act. The register serves as a federal listing of buildings, sites, structures, districts, and objects that meet one or more of the criteria defined in 36 CFR Part 60.4. If a site is eligible, a form is completed and submitted for nomination. Once nominated, the form is reviewed by the National Register Department, then by the State Board of Review for formal consideration. If passed, it is submitted to the Keeper of the National Register for final approval and listing. The first listing of Texas properties in the register was in October 1969. The Division of Architecture reviews proposed changes to historic buildings to determine if the changes will result in any adverse effects to the building, and works with the project sponsor to either lessen or mitigate adverse effects.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No files present prior to 1982.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: Unknown

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: National Register of Historic Places Reviews
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 29A
Archival code: none
Retention: AC+45

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents changes made to structures listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Awarding of this status requires the agency to review and approve any architectural changes to these buildings. Even though some of the correspondence is duplicated in the national register files in the History Programs Division, the remaining materials document more thoroughly the actual changes made to the structures. Because of the statutory necessity for documenting any changes to these historic structures and the historic value of these structures to their local communities and the state, this series has been appraised to be archival. An archival code of "A" needs to be added to the retention schedule for this series and the retention period changed to "AV"–administratively valuable. A note can be added to the Remarks section as follows: "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: National Register of Historic Places — Plans/maps/drawings

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Division of Architecture

Contact: Abby Wood
463-8821

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for 45 years after completion of the project. Current holdings date from 1982-[ongoing], totaling about 2 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains plans and drawings relating to the architectural review of changes made to buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Reviews, correspondence, and photographs associated with the plans and drawings are filed in the series National Register of Historic Places Reviews.

Files containing the applications and associated materials requesting listing of a building or structure on the National Register of Historic Places are housed in the History Programs Division, see the series National Register project files. Additional National Register series in the History Programs Division are National Register supplemental documentation, County files [preliminary National Register files], and Historical resources slide files.

Purpose:

These records are created and maintained as changes are made to buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Division of Architecture administers architectural grants through the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program, monitors the state’s National Historic Landmarks and reviews proposed changes to Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. It also monitors and provides technical consultation on the restoration and adaptive reuse of the state’s architectural resources.

The National Register of Historic Places was established in 1966 through passage of the National Historic Preservation Act. The register serves as a federal listing of buildings, sites, structures, districts, and objects that meet one or more of the criteria defined in 36 CFR Part 60.4. If a site is eligible, a form is completed and submitted for nomination. Once nominated, the form is reviewed by the National Register Department, then by the State Board of Review for formal consideration. If passed, it is submitted to the Keeper of the National Register for final approval and listing. The first listing of Texas properties in the register was in October 1969. The Division of Architecture reviews proposed changes to historic buildings to determine if the changes will result in any adverse effects to the building, and works with the project sponsor to either lessen or mitigate adverse effects.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No files present prior to 1982.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: Unknown

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: National Register of Historic Places — Plans/maps/drawings
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 29B
Archival code: none
Retention: AC+45

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents changes made to structures listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Awarding of this status requires the agency to review and approve any architectural changes to these buildings. Because of the statutory necessity for documenting any changes to these historic structures and the historic value of these structures to their local communities and the state, this series has been appraised to be archival. An archival code of "A" needs to be added to the retention schedule for this series and the retention period changed to "AV"–administratively valuable. A note can be added to the Remarks section as follows: "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Military sites program files 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Division of Architecture

Contact: Abby Wood
463-8821

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: five cubic ft.

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency permanently. Current holdings of the agency date from 1997-[ongoing], totaling 10 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains correspondence, photographs, books and other publications, videos, and a database of Texas-related historic military sites in the United States. Dates covered are 1997-[ongoing]. This series was created in response to a request of the Legislature. In 1995 the Legislature directed the Historical Commission to create a military sites program to preserve, develop, and promote outstanding military sites in Texas or related to Texas (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session).

Purpose:

These records are created and maintained, at the request of the Legislature, to preserve, develop, and promote historic military sites in Texas and Texas-related military sites in the United States. These records also serve as research files for agency publications on Texas military sites.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Division of Architecture administers architectural grants through the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program, monitors the state’s National Historic Landmarks and reviews proposed changes to Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. It also monitors and provides technical consultation on the restoration and adaptive reuse of the state’s architectural resources. It also administers the military sites program. In 1995 the Legislature directed the Historical Commission to create a military sites program to preserve, develop, and promote outstanding military sites in Texas or related to Texas.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Topical.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No records are present prior to 1997.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: Unknown

Publications based on records:

These two publications are by the Historical Commission. Sacred Soil: Preserving Texas Military Sites of the Nineteenth Century. Civil War Map of Texas.

A survey of military site information was prepared in 1996 by the Office of the State Archeologist, which focused on the records in the OSA but included military related records in all the divisions of the Commission. Texas Military Sites. A guide to the materials in the holdings of the Office of the State Archeologist.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Military sites program files
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 30
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

Historical Commission. Sacred Soil: Preserving Texas Military Sites of the Nineteenth Century. Civil War Map of Texas.

Office of the State Archeologist, Texas Military Sites. A guide to the materials in the holdings of the Office of the State Archeologist.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents historic military sites in Texas and Texas-related military sites in the United States. In 1995 the Legislature directed the Historical Commission to create a military sites program to preserve, develop, and promote outstanding military sites in Texas or related to Texas. This series is fulfilling this legislative mandate. Military sites are often sought after by military and other historians and genealogists. Documentation such as can be found in this series needs to be preserved for its research and informational value. This series has been appraised to be archival. An archival code of "A" needs to be added to the retention schedule for this series and the retention period changed to "AV"–administratively valuable. A note can be added to the Remarks section as follows: "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Texas Antiquities Advisory Board meeting files 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency permanently. Current holdings of the agency are dated 1995-[ongoing], comprising 1.5 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains the meeting files of the Texas Antiquities Advisory Board, dating from 1995-[ongoing]. Materials present include minutes, agenda, and materials presented to committee members for discussion or review.

Topics discussed at the meetings primarily involve changes in or issues involving the Texas Antiquities Code, and nominations for state archeological landmark status. Minutes for the Texas Antiquities Committee meetings can be found in the series Texas Antiquities Committee meeting files.

Purpose:

The minutes document the decisions made by the Texas Antiquities Advisory Board.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board is composed of seven members appointed by the Texas Historical Commission and are professionals in the fields of history, architecture, and archeology. It serves as an advisory board to the Historical Commission by evaluating nominations for State Archeological Landmark status and considering issues associated with the Texas Antiquities Code.

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Antiquities Code of Texas (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Reverse chronological order, by meeting date.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? None

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Meeting agenda and minutes
Series item number: 1.1.058
Agency item number: 6
Archival code: A
Retention: PM

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Meetings–supporting documentation
Series item number: 1.1.062
Agency item number: 21
Archival code: A
Retention: PS+5

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents the actions of the Texas Antiquities Advisory Board meetings. Although this is an advisory body, they do provide input to the Historical Commission regarding nomination of sites for state archeological landmark status and issues pertaining to the Texas Antiquities Code. I recommend these materials–minutes, agenda, and meeting documentation be appraised as archival. There are two series on the schedule which cover this series, both are currently coded as archival and these codes should remain as "A." The agency needs to send us copies of the minutes and agenda of the advisory board beginning in 1995 and the meeting documentation when it is no longer needed for administrative purposes at the agency.

I recommend the names of the series be changed to Texas Antiquities Advisory Board meeting minutes and agenda and Texas Antiquities Advisory Board meeting supporting documentation, to distinguish them from similar series listed on the schedule.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Texas Antiquities Committee meeting and hearing files

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? Yes
Replaced by: none

Ongoing record series? No
Annual accumulation:

Agency holdings:

The minutes and agenda are retained by the agency permanently, dating 1969-1995, comprising about 2 cubic ft. The older meeting and hearing documentation of the committee have already been transferred to the Library and Archives Commission. The agency still has meeting files from 1993-1995, comprising about 3 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains the meeting files of the Texas Antiquities Committee (TAC), dating from 1969-1995. Materials present include minutes, agenda, materials presented to committee members for discussion or review, and materials presented as exhibits at the meetings. Types of materials present in addition to minutes and agenda may include correspondence, memoranda, rules, regulations, copies of contracts, attorney general opinions, court documents, press releases, clippings, conference proceedings, brochures, site survey forms, maps, lists of sites nominated for state archeological landmark status, and attendance sheets.

At some of their meetings the commission conducted evidentiary hearings, such as to determine the status of a site nominated for or granted state archeological landmark status. For these hearings, transcripts and materials introduced as exhibits are present in addition to minutes and agenda, which can include petitions, drawings, photographs, correspondence, memoranda, and motions, requests, and other legal documents.

Topics discussed at the meetings included status of antiquities permits, changes in or addition to antiquities laws, field work and/or research undertaken by TAC staff, significant archeological discoveries, exhibition of artifacts, nominations for state archeological landmark status, requests to remove state archeological landmark status, budget, personnel, and other administrative issues relating to the operation of the TAC.

A separate series contains audio recordings of some of the meetings. See the series Texas Antiquities Committee audio recordings of meetings.

Minutes for the advisory committee which now assists the archeology programs of the Historical Commission can be found in the series Texas Antiquities Advisory Board meeting files.

Purpose:

The minutes document the decisions made by the Texas Antiquities Committee.

Agency program:

Texas Antiquities Committee was created by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session (1969). The Committee was initially composed of seven members–Director of the State Historical Survey Committee, Director of Parks and Wildlife Department, Commissioner of the General Land Office, State Archeologist (whose office was transferred in 1969 from the State Building Commission to the Texas State Historical Survey Committee), one professional archeologist from a recognized museum or institution of higher learning, one professional Texas historian, and the Director of the Texas Memorial Museum of the University of Texas. The makeup of the Committee when it expired in 1995 was a nine-member commission. It consisted of six ex-officio members, including the chairperson of the Texas Historical Commission or his/her designee, the State Archaeologist, the Director of the Parks and Wildlife Department, the Commissioner of the General Land Office, the State Engineer, and the Executive Director of the Texas Department of Water Resources. The three other members were appointed by the Governor with concurrence of the Senate, for two-year terms. These appointed members consisted of a professional historian, a professional archaeologist, and a professional museum director.

This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Texas Antiquities Code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995, the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Reverse chronological order, by meeting date.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? None

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Former series data from agency schedule:

Title: Meeting agenda and minutes
Series item number: 1.1.058
Agency item number: 6
Archival code: A
Retention: PM

Former series data from agency schedule:

Title: Meetings–supporting documentation
Series item number: 1.1.062
Agency item number: 21
Archival code: A
Retention: PS+5

Archival holdings:

Texas Antiquities Committee meeting and hearing files, 1969-1992, 7 cubic ft.

Appraisal decision:

Most of these files have been transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division already. The remaining files are due to be transferred in the near future. The agency is retaining a copy of the minutes and agenda for their files. Meeting minutes, agenda, and meeting documentation are already considered to be archival as they document the actions of the governing body of the agency. The series listed above are still on the schedule but contain records of the Texas Antiquities Advisory Board, which assists the Archeology Division of the Historical Commission in an advisory capacity. Those meeting files are reviewed separately in this report. See the series Texas Antiquities Advisory Board meeting files.

If the agency decides to retain a permanent copy of the meeting agenda and minutes of the Texas Antiquities Committee, that series will need to be added to the schedule as Texas Antiquities Committee meeting minutes and agenda, with an archival code of A and a retention period of PM.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Texas Antiquities Committee audio recordings of meetings

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? Yes
Replaced by: none

Ongoing record series? No
Annual accumulation:

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for several years after the meeting was held. Current holdings of the agency are from 1987-1993, totaling about 0.25 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains audio recordings of Texas Antiquities Committee meetings. These are 5" and 3" reel-to-reel tapes and some audiocassettes of Texas Antiquities Committee meetings. Transcripts are not available for most meetings. Dates of the audio recordings are 1973-1980, 1983-1985, and 1987-1993.

Topics discussed at the meetings included status of antiquities permits, changes in or addition to antiquities laws, field work and/or research undertaken by TAC staff, significant archeological discoveries, exhibition of artifacts, nominations for state archeological landmark status, requests to remove state archeological landmark status, budget, personnel, and other administrative issues relating to the operation on the TAC.

Purpose:

These tapes were created and maintained to provide audio documentation of the decisions made by the Antiquities Committee.

Agency program:

Texas Antiquities Committee was created by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session (1969). The Committee was initially composed of seven members–Director of the State Historical Survey Committee, Director of Parks and Wildlife Department, Commissioner of the General Land Office, State Archeologist (whose office was transferred in 1969 from the State Building Commission to the Texas State Historical Survey Committee), one professional archeologist from a recognized museum or institution of higher learning, one professional Texas historian, and the Director of the Texas Memorial Museum of the University of Texas. The makeup of the Committee when it expired in 1995 was a nine-member commission. It consisted of six ex-officio members, including the chairperson of the Texas Historical Commission or his/her designee, the State Archaeologist, the Director of the Parks and Wildlife Department, the Commissioner of the General Land Office, the State Engineer, and the Executive Director of the Texas Department of Water Resources. The three other members were appointed by the Governor with concurrence of the Senate, for two-year terms. These appointed members consisted of a professional historian, a professional archaeologist, and a professional museum director.

This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Texas Antiquities Code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Reverse chronological order, by meeting date.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? None

Gaps: 1981-1982, 1986, 1994-1995

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule: Not on the schedule.

Suggested series from the state retention schedule: None, as this is an obsolete series whose records have passed their retention period.

Archival holdings:

Texas Antiquities Committee audio recordings of meetings, 1978-1980, 1973-1985, 2 cubic ft.

Appraisal decision:

The tapes provide audio documentation of the actions of the Antiquities Committee. However, audio tapes are a short-term medium and the actions of the Antiquities Committee are summarized in the minutes of the meetings. The minutes provide a concise summary of the actions of the committee. This is sufficient documentation of this process. These tapes have been appraised to be non-archival. Most of the tapes are currently at the Library and Archives Commission for archival review. They can be offered back to the agency or discarded, as their required retention period has long passed. The tapes still held by the agency can be discarded as their retention period (AC+90 days for this series) has passed.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Rules and regulations

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: unknown

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for three years after they are superseded. Current holdings of the agency date from 1991-1993, totaling about 1.24 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains drafts of proposed rules and rule changes to the administrative rules that administer the Texas Antiquities Code, comments concerning the changes from outside parties, correspondence, and lists of people notified about the changes. Dates covered are 1980-1984, 1987-1988, and 1991-1993. There are often several draft versions of the rules with notes and a final copy that was sent to the Texas Register. Topics include permitting work on and protection of state archeological landmarks, historic preservation, permits for salvage work, and adjudication procedures. This series currently covers only changes to the Texas Antiquities Code during the period the Antiquities Committee was a separate entity from the Historical Commission. Copies of all rules operating in the agency are in the series Policies and procedures manuals (to be renamed agency rules, policies, and procedures), housed in the Administrative Division.

Purpose:

These records were created as changes are made to the administrative rules that administer the Texas Antiquities Code.

Agency program:

Texas Antiquities Committee was created by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session (1969). The Committee was initially composed of seven members–Director of the State Historical Survey Committee, Director of Parks and Wildlife Department, Commissioner of the General Land Office, State Archeologist (whose office was transferred in 1969 from the State Building Commission to the Texas State Historical Survey Committee), one professional archeologist from a recognized museum or institution of higher learning, one professional Texas historian, and the Director of the Texas Memorial Museum of the University of Texas. The makeup of the Committee when it expired in 1995 was a nine-member commission. It consisted of six ex-officio members, including the chairperson of the Texas Historical Commission or his/her designee, the State Archaeologist, the Director of the Parks and Wildlife Department, the Commissioner of the General Land Office, the State Engineer, and the Executive Director of the Texas Department of Water Resources. The three other members were appointed by the Governor with concurrence of the Senate, for two-year terms. These appointed members consisted of a professional historian, a professional archaeologist, and a professional museum director.

This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Texas Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No files present from 1969-1979, 1985-1986, or 1989-1990, 1994-1995.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records:

Proposed and adopted rules are published in the Texas Register. Adopted rules are also published in the Texas Administrative Code, Title 13, Chapters 25-28.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule: (Note: current state retention schedule calls for archival review of this series)
Title: Rules and regulations
Series item number: 1.1.025
Agency item number: 19
Archival code: R
Retention: US+3

Archival holdings:

Rules and regulations, Texas Antiquities Code, 1980-1984, 1987-1988, 1 cubic ft.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents suggestions incorporated into changes made in the administrative rules which administer the Texas Antiquities Code. It contains not only copies of Texas Register listings but also correspondence with individuals concerning proposed changes, including their comments and suggestions; various drafts of changes with notes; and the final version. The significant comments are published in the Texas Register, which is sufficient documentation of this process. The series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks column for these series — "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Department of the Army: Comment made (not final) 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained in-house by the agency for 2 years after closure of the project, then stored offsite for 23 years. Current volume dates from c. 1970 to [ongoing], totaling 6 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains Section 106 reviews, correspondence and draft reports concerning reviews conducted by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470). Dates covered are c. 1970-[ongoing]. Reviews are conducted when construction or other potential site destruction activities to be undertaken by government agencies could impact the historical significance of historic sites on or in the vicinity of military bases in Texas. Types of projects involved are generally maneuver training, building demolition, or building reuse projects. Correspondence is generally between the staff of the Historical Commission and the U.S. Department of the Army. Projects producing substantial or significant changes to a site are published in a report. Copies of final reports resulting from the review process are filed in the library of the Texas Historical Commission, see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final.

Area maps of sites reviewed can be found in the series Department of the Army: Plans/maps/drawings.

Purpose:

This series was created in the course of Section 106 reviews done by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

The National Historic Preservation Act, Section 106, requires project sponsors to work with the state historic preservation officer to identify and minimize impacts to historic properties due to federal construction or similar projects, such as building new roads, reservoirs, municipal waste water treatment facilities, and making improvements to county housing projects. The Texas Historical Commission serves as the state historic preservation office and conducts the reviews. If the Historical Commission determines the proposed project will impact a historic or archeological site, they will work with the sponsor to either try and change construction materials or methods, move important buildings away from the site, or document the property or site before it is destroyed. For archeological sites this would include surveys of the site and possibly some excavation of materials to provide samples of artifact deposits. After the site has been documented, the project can proceed.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetically by name of the army base.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No records present prior to about 1970.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

Records concerning the proposed projects the commission is reviewing should be available in the agency undertaking the project.

Publications based on records:

Some project reviews result in reports.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Department of the Army: Comment made (not final)
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 63
Archival code: R
Retention: 25

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Archives and Library Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

Archeological reports resulting from Section 106 reviews are regularly deposited; exact titles and agencies affected were too numerous to list for each Section 106 series.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents reviews done by the Historical Commission prior to construction or other potential site destruction activities to determine if the proposed activity will impact an archeological or historic site. Documentation of substantial changes made are published in a report and filed in the library of the Historical Commission and sent to the Publications Depository–see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final. While some activities may result in major changes to a site, many of these are routine. Since reports are prepared which document the more substantial work done in these endeavors this series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks column for these series — "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999." The agency is renaming the series Department of the Army: Project files.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Department of the Army: Plans/maps/drawings

 

 

 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained in-house by the agency until closure of the project, then stored offsite for 20 years. Current volume dates from c. 1970 to [ongoing], fractional cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains area maps used in conjunction with reviews conducted by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470). Dates covered are c. 1970-[ongoing]. Reviews are conducted when construction or other potential site destruction activities to be undertaken by federal agencies could impact the historical significance of historic sites on or in the vicinity of military bases in Texas. Types of projects involved include maneuver training and building demolition or reuse. Projects producing substantial or significant changes to a site are published in a report. Copies of final reports resulting from the review process are filed in the library of the Texas Historical Commission, see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final.

Correspondence and Section 106 reviews concerning these sites or facilities can be found in the series Department of the Army: Comment made (not final).

Purpose:

This series was created to maintain maps and plans used in conjunction with Section 106 reviews done by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

The National Historic Preservation Act, Section 106, requires project sponsors to work with the state historic preservation officer to identify and minimize impacts to historic properties due to federal construction or similar projects, such as building new roads, reservoirs, municipal waste water treatment facilities, and making improvements to county housing projects. The Texas Historical Commission serves as the state historic preservation office and conducts the reviews. If the Historical Commission determines the proposed project will impact a historic or archeological site, they will work with the sponsor to either try and change construction materials or methods, move important buildings away from the site, or document the property or site before it is destroyed. For archeological sites this would include surveys of the site and possibly some excavation of materials to provide samples of artifact deposits. After the site has been documented, the project can proceed.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetically by name of the army base.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No records present prior to about 1970.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

Records concerning the proposed projects the commission is reviewing should be available in the agency undertaking the project.

Publications based on records:

Some project reviews result in reports.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Department of the Army: Plans/Maps/Drawings
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 65
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+20

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Archives and Library Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

Archeological reports resulting from Section 106 reviews are regularly deposited; exact titles and agencies affected were too numerous to list for each Section 106 series.

Appraisal decision:

This series consist of maps and/or plans used as reference materials by the agency when preparing the Section 106 reviews. These are not maps/plans done by the Historical Commission but are done by other agencies, such as the Texas Department of Transportation, the U.S. Geological Survey, etc. Because they are materials used as reference documentation instead of agency created materials, this series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks column for these series — "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Department of the Air Force: Comment made (not final) 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained in-house by the agency for 2 years after closure of the project, then stored offsite for 23 years. Current volume dates from c. 1970 to [ongoing], totaling 6 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains Section 106 reviews, correspondence and draft reports concerning reviews conducted by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470). Dates covered are c. 1970-[ongoing]. Reviews are conducted when construction or other potential site destruction activities to be undertaken by government agencies could impact the historical significance of historic sites on or in the vicinity of military bases in Texas. Types of projects involved are generally maneuver training, building demolition, or building reuse projects. Correspondence is generally between the staff of the Historical Commission and the U.S. Department of the Air Force. Projects producing substantial or significant changes to a site are published in a report. Copies of final reports resulting from the review process are filed in the library of the Texas Historical Commission, see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final.

Area maps of sites reviewed can be found in the series Department of the Air Force: plans/maps/drawings.

Purpose:

This series was created in the course of Section 106 reviews done by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

The National Historic Preservation Act, Section 106, requires project sponsors to work with the state historic preservation officer to identify and minimize impacts to historic properties due to federal construction or similar projects, such as building new roads, reservoirs, municipal waste water treatment facilities, and making improvements to county housing projects. The Texas Historical Commission serves as the state historic preservation office and conducts the reviews. If the Historical Commission determines the proposed project will impact a historic or archeological site, they will work with the sponsor to either try and change construction materials or methods, move important buildings away from the site, or document the property or site before it is destroyed. For archeological sites this would include surveys of the site and possibly some excavation of materials to provide samples of artifact deposits. After the site has been documented, the project can proceed.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetically by name of the air force base.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No present records prior to about 1970.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

Records concerning the proposed projects the commission is reviewing should be available in the agency undertaking the project.

Publications based on records:

Some project reviews result in reports.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Department of the Air Force: Comment made (not final)
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 66
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+25

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Archives and Library Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

Archeological reports resulting from Section 106 reviews are regularly deposited; exact titles and agencies affected were too numerous to list for each Section 106 series.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents reviews done by the Historical Commission prior to construction or other potential site destruction activities to determine if the proposed activity will impact an archeological or historic site. Documentation of substantial changes made are published in a report and filed in the library of the Historical Commission and sent to the Publications Depository–see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final. While some activities may result in major changes to a site, many of these are routine. Since reports are prepared which document the more substantial work done in these endeavors this series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks column for these series — "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999." The agency is renaming the series Department of the Air Force: Project files.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Department of the Air Force: Plans/maps/drawings

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained in-house by the agency until closure of the project, then stored offsite for 20 years. Current volume dates from c. 1970 to [ongoing], totaling 3 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains area maps used in conjunction with reviews conducted by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470). Dates covered are c. 1970-[ongoing]. Reviews are conducted when construction or other potential site destruction activities to be undertaken by federal agencies could impact the historical significance of historic sites on or in the vicinity of military bases in Texas. Types of projects involved include maneuver training and building demolition or reuse. Projects producing substantial or significant changes to a site are published in a report. Copies of final reports resulting from the review process are filed in the library of the Texas Historical Commission, see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final.

Correspondence and Section 106 reviews concerning these sites or facilities can be found in the series Department of the Air Force: Comment made (not final).

Purpose:

This series was created to maintain maps and plans used in conjunction with Section 106 reviews done by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

The National Historic Preservation Act, Section 106, requires project sponsors to work with the state historic preservation officer to identify and minimize impacts to historic properties due to federal construction or similar projects, such as building new roads, reservoirs, municipal waste water treatment facilities, and making improvements to county housing projects. The Texas Historical Commission serves as the state historic preservation office and conducts the reviews. If the Historical Commission determines the proposed project will impact a historic or archeological site, they will work with the sponsor to either try and change construction materials or methods, move important buildings away from the site, or document the property or site before it is destroyed. For archeological sites this would include surveys of the site and possibly some excavation of materials to provide samples of artifact deposits. After the site has been documented, the project can proceed.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by name of the air force base.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No records present prior to about 1970.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

Records concerning the proposed projects the commission is reviewing should be available in the agency undertaking the project.

Publications based on records:

Some project reviews result in reports.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Department of the Air Force: Plans/maps/drawings
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 68
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+20

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

Archeological reports resulting from Section 106 reviews are regularly deposited; exact titles and agencies affected were too numerous to list for each Section 106 series.

Appraisal decision:

This series consist of maps and/or plans used as reference materials by the agency when preparing the Section 106 reviews. These are not maps/plans done by the Historical Commission but are done by other agencies, such as the Texas Department of Transportation, the U.S. Geological Survey, etc. Because they are materials used as reference documentation instead of agency created materials, this series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks column for these series — "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Department of the Navy: Comment made 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: about _ cubic ft.

Agency holdings:

Retained in-house by the agency for 2 years after closure of the project, then stored offsite for 23 years. Current volume dates from c. 1970 to [ongoing], totaling 4 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains Section 106 reviews, correspondence and draft reports concerning reviews conducted by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470). Dates covered are c. 1970-[ongoing]. Reviews are conducted when construction or other potential site destruction activities to be undertaken by government agencies could impact the historical significance of historic sites on or in the vicinity of military bases in Texas. Types of projects involved are generally building reuse projects. Correspondence is generally between the staff of the Historical Commission and the U.S. Department of the Navy. Projects producing substantial or significant changes to a site are published in a report. Copies of final reports resulting from the review process are filed in the library of the Texas Historical Commission, see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final.

Purpose:

This series was created in the course of Section 106 reviews done by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

The National Historic Preservation Act, Section 106, requires project sponsors to work with the state historic preservation officer to identify and minimize impacts to historic properties due to federal construction or similar projects, such as building new roads, reservoirs, municipal waste water treatment facilities, and making improvements to county housing projects. The Texas Historical Commission serves as the state historic preservation office and conducts the reviews. If the Historical Commission determines the proposed project will impact a historic or archeological site, they will work with the sponsor to either try and change construction materials or methods, move important buildings away from the site, or document the property or site before it is destroyed. For archeological sites this would include surveys of the site and possibly some excavation of materials to provide samples of artifact deposits. After the site has been documented, the project can proceed.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by name of the navy base.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No records present prior to about 1970.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

Records concerning the proposed projects the commission is reviewing should be available in the agency undertaking the project.

Publications based on records:

Some project reviews result in reports.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Department of the Navy: Comment made
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 69
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+25

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Archives and Library Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

Archeological reports resulting from Section 106 reviews are regularly deposited; exact titles and agencies affected were too numerous to list for each Section 106 series.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents reviews done by the Historical Commission prior to construction or other potential site destruction activities to determine if the proposed activity will impact an archeological or historic site. Documentation of substantial changes made are published in a report and filed in the library of the Historical Commission and sent to the Publications Depository–see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final. While some activities may result in major changes to a site, many of these are routine. Since reports are prepared which document the more substantial work done in these endeavors this series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks column for these series — "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999." The agency is renaming the series Department of the Navy: Project files.

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Records Series Review
Series Titles: Economic Development Administration: Major projects/rehabs or acquisitions

and

Economic Development Administration: Comment made/small projects

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained in-house by the agency until closure of the project, then stored offsite for 20 years. Current volume dates from c. 1970 to [ongoing], totaling 1 cubic ft.

Description:

These series contain Section 106 reviews, correspondence and draft reports concerning reviews conducted by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470). Dates covered are c. 1970-[ongoing]. Reviews are conducted when construction or other potential site destruction activities to be undertaken by government agencies could impact the historical significance of historic facilities or sites in Texas. Types of projects involved include business startups and the reuse of buildings. Correspondence is generally between the staff of the Historical Commission and the U.S. Economic Development Administration. Projects producing substantial or significant changes to a site are published in a report. Copies of final reports resulting from the review process are filed in the library of the Texas Historical Commission, see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final.

Plans of buildings and sites reviewed can be found in the series Economic Development Administration: Plans/maps/drawings.

Purpose:

These series were created in the course of Section 106 reviews done by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

The National Historic Preservation Act, Section 106, requires project sponsors to work with the state historic preservation officer to identify and minimize impacts to historic properties due to federal construction or similar projects, such as building new roads, reservoirs, municipal waste water treatment facilities, and making improvements to county housing projects. The Texas Historical Commission serves as the state historic preservation office and conducts the reviews. If the Historical Commission determines the proposed project will impact a historic or archeological site, they will work with the sponsor to either try and change construction materials or methods, move important buildings away from the site, or document the property or site before it is destroyed. For archeological sites this would include surveys of the site and possibly some excavation of materials to provide samples of artifact deposits. After the site has been documented, the project can proceed.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetically

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No records present prior to about 1970.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

Records concerning the proposed projects the commission is reviewing should be available in the agency undertaking the project.

Publications based on records:

Some project reviews result in reports.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Economic Development Administration: Major projects/rehabs or acquisitions
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 83
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+20

Title: Economic Development Administration: Comments made/small projects
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 84
Archival code: R
Retention AC+25

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Archives and Library Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

Archeological reports resulting from Section 106 reviews are regularly deposited; exact titles and agencies affected were too numerous to list for each Section 106 series.

Appraisal decision:

These series document reviews done by the Historical Commission prior to construction or other potential site destruction activities to determine if the proposed activity will impact an archeological or historic site. Documentation of substantial changes made are published in a report and filed in the library of the Historical Commission and sent to the Publications Depository–see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final. While some activities may result in major changes to a site, many of these are routine. Since reports are prepared which document the more substantial work done in these endeavors this series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks column for these series — "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999." The agency is combining the two series listed above and renaming the series Economic Development Administration: Project files.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Economic Development Administration: Plans/maps/drawings 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained in-house by the agency until closure of the project, then stored offsite for 20 years. Current volume dates from c. 1970 to [ongoing], fractional cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains plans of buildings or sites in conjunction with reviews conducted by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470). Dates covered are c. 1970-[ongoing]. Reviews are conducted when construction or other potential site destruction activities to be undertaken by government agencies could impact the historical significance of historic facilities or sites in Texas. Types of projects involved include business startups and the reuse of buildings. Projects producing substantial or significant changes to a site are published in a report. Copies of final reports resulting from the review process are filed in the library of the Texas Historical Commission, see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final.

Correspondence and Section 106 reviews concerning these sites or buildings can be found in the series Economic Development Administration: Major projects/rehabs or acquisitions and Economic Development Administration: Comment made/small projects.

Purpose:

This series was created to maintain maps and plans used in conjunction with Section 106 reviews done by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

The National Historic Preservation Act, Section 106, requires project sponsors to work with the state historic preservation officer to identify and minimize impacts to historic properties due to federal construction or similar projects, such as building new roads, reservoirs, municipal waste water treatment facilities, and making improvements to county housing projects. The Texas Historical Commission serves as the state historic preservation office and conducts the reviews. If the Historical Commission determines the proposed project will impact a historic or archeological site, they will work with the sponsor to either try and change construction materials or methods, move important buildings away from the site, or document the property or site before it is destroyed. For archeological sites this would include surveys of the site and possibly some excavation of materials to provide samples of artifact deposits. After the site has been documented, the project can proceed.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No records present prior to about 1970.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

Records concerning the proposed projects the commission is reviewing should be available in the agency undertaking the project.

Publications based on records:

Some project reviews result in reports.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Economic Development Administration: Plans/maps/drawings
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 86
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+20

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

Archeological reports resulting from Section 106 reviews are regularly deposited; exact titles and agencies affected were too numerous to list for each Section 106 series.

Appraisal decision:

This series consist of maps and/or plans used as reference materials by the agency when preparing the Section 106 reviews. These are not maps/plans done by the Historical Commission but are done by other agencies, such as the Texas Department of Transportation, the U.S. Geological Survey, etc. Because they are materials used as reference documentation instead of agency created materials, this series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks column for these series — "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Environmental Protection Agency: Major projects 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained in-house by the agency for 2 years after closure of the project, then stored offsite for 23 years. Current volume dates from c. 1970 to [ongoing], totaling 4 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains Section 106 reviews, correspondence and draft reports concerning reviews conducted by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470). Dates covered are c. 1970-[ongoing]. Reviews are conducted when construction or other potential site destruction activities to be undertaken by government agencies could impact the historical significance of historic facilities or sites in Texas. Types of projects involved include building landfills and discharge of wastewater. Correspondence is generally between the staff of the Historical Commission and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Projects producing substantial or significant changes to a site are published in a report. Copies of final reports resulting from the review process are filed in the library of the Texas Historical Commission, see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final.

Purpose:

This series was created in the course of Section 106 reviews done by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

The National Historic Preservation Act, Section 106, requires project sponsors to work with the state historic preservation officer to identify and minimize impacts to historic properties due to federal construction or similar projects, such as building new roads, reservoirs, municipal waste water treatment facilities, and making improvements to county housing projects. The Texas Historical Commission serves as the state historic preservation office and conducts the reviews. If the Historical Commission determines the proposed project will impact a historic or archeological site, they will work with the sponsor to either try and change construction materials or methods, move important buildings away from the site, or document the property or site before it is destroyed. For archeological sites this would include surveys of the site and possibly some excavation of materials to provide samples of artifact deposits. After the site has been documented, the project can proceed.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No records present prior to about 1970.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

Records concerning the proposed projects the commission is reviewing should be available in the agency undertaking the project.

Publications based on records:

Some project reviews result in reports.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Environmental Protection Agency: Major projects
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 87
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+25

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Archives and Library Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

Archeological reports resulting from Section 106 reviews are regularly deposited; exact titles and agencies affected were too numerous to list for each Section 106 series.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents reviews done by the Historical Commission prior to construction or other potential site destruction activities to determine if the proposed activity will impact an archeological or historic site. Documentation of substantial changes made are published in a report and filed in the library of the Historical Commission and sent to the Publications Depository–see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final. While some activities may result in major changes to a site, many of these are routine. Since reports are prepared which document the more substantial work done in these endeavors this series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks column for these series — "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999." The agency is renaming the series Environmental Protection Agency: Project files.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: General Services Administration: Comment made (not final) 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained in-house by the agency for 2 years, then stored offsite for 23 years. Current volume dates from c. 1970 to [ongoing], totaling 4 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains Section 106 reviews, correspondence and draft reports concerning reviews conducted by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470). Dates covered are c. 1970-[ongoing]. Reviews are conducted when construction or other potential site destruction activities to be undertaken by government agencies could impact the historical significance of historic facilities or sites in Texas. Types of projects involved include renovations and rehabilitation of courthouses and post offices. Correspondence is generally between the staff of the Historical Commission and the U.S. General Services Administration. Projects producing substantial or significant changes to a site are published in a report. Copies of final reports resulting from the review process are filed in the library of the Texas Historical Commission, see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final.

Plans of buildings reviewed can be found in the series General Services Administration: Plans/maps/drawings.

Purpose:

This series was created in the course of Section 106 reviews done by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

The National Historic Preservation Act, Section 106, requires project sponsors to work with the state historic preservation officer to identify and minimize impacts to historic properties due to federal construction or similar projects, such as building new roads, reservoirs, municipal waste water treatment facilities, and making improvements to county housing projects. The Texas Historical Commission serves as the state historic preservation office and conducts the reviews. If the Historical Commission determines the proposed project will impact a historic or archeological site, they will work with the sponsor to either try and change construction materials or methods, move important buildings away from the site, or document the property or site before it is destroyed. For archeological sites this would include surveys of the site and possibly some excavation of materials to provide samples of artifact deposits. After the site has been documented, the project can proceed.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by name of the facility.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No records present prior to about 1970.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

Records concerning the proposed projects the commission is reviewing should be available in the agency undertaking the project.

Publications based on records:

Some project reviews result in reports.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: General Services Administration: Comment made (not final)
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 107
Archival code: R
Retention: 25

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Archives and Library Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

Archeological reports resulting from Section 106 reviews are regularly deposited; exact titles and agencies affected were too numerous to list for each Section 106 series.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents reviews done by the Historical Commission prior to construction or other potential site destruction activities to determine if the proposed activity will impact an archeological or historic site. Documentation of substantial changes made are published in a report and filed in the library of the Historical Commission and sent to the Publications Depository–see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final. While some activities may result in major changes to a site, many of these are routine. Since reports are prepared which document the more substantial work done in these endeavors this series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks column for these series — "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999." The agency is renaming the series General Services Administration: Project files.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: General Services Administration: Plans/maps/drawings

 Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained in-house by the agency until closure of the project, then stored offsite for 20 years. Current volume dates from c. 1970 to [ongoing], totaling 2 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains plans of the buildings reviewed in conjunction with reviews conducted by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470). Dates covered are c. 1970-[ongoing]. Reviews are conducted when construction or other potential site destruction activities to be undertaken by government agencies could impact the historical significance of historic facilities or sites in Texas. Types of projects involved include renovations and rehabilitation of courthouses and post offices. Projects producing substantial or significant changes to a site are published in a report. Copies of final reports resulting from the review process are filed in the library of the Texas Historical Commission, see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final.

Correspondence and Section 106 reviews of the buildings reviewed can be found in the series General Services Administration: Comment made (not final).

Purpose:

This series was created to maintain maps and plans used in conjunction with Section 106 reviews done by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

The National Historic Preservation Act, Section 106, requires project sponsors to work with the state historic preservation officer to identify and minimize impacts to historic properties due to federal construction or similar projects, such as building new roads, reservoirs, municipal waste water treatment facilities, and making improvements to county housing projects. The Texas Historical Commission serves as the state historic preservation office and conducts the reviews. If the Historical Commission determines the proposed project will impact a historic or archeological site, they will work with the sponsor to either try and change construction materials or methods, move important buildings away from the site, or document the property or site before it is destroyed. For archeological sites this would include surveys of the site and possibly some excavation of materials to provide samples of artifact deposits. After the site has been documented, the project can proceed.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No records present prior to about 1970.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

Records concerning the proposed projects the commission is reviewing should be available in the agency undertaking the project.

Publications based on records:

Some project reviews result in reports.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: General Services Administration: Plans/maps/drawings
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 109
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+20

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

Archeological reports resulting from Section 106 reviews are regularly deposited; exact titles and agencies affected were too numerous to list for each Section 106 series.

Appraisal decision:

This series consist of maps and/or plans used as reference materials by the agency when preparing the Section 106 reviews. These are not maps/plans done by the Historical Commission but are done by other agencies, such as the Texas Department of Transportation, the U.S. Geological Survey, etc. Because they are materials used as reference documentation instead of agency created materials, this series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks column for these series — "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: HUD — Community Development Block Grant: One-Phase construction clearances

and

HUD — Community Development Block Grant: Multi-year project clearances 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained in-house by the agency for 2 years, then stored offsite for 23 years. Current volume dates from c. 1970 to [ongoing], totaling 6 cubic ft.

Description:

These series contain Section 106 reviews, correspondence and draft reports concerning reviews conducted by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470). Dates covered are c. 1970-[ongoing]. Reviews are conducted when construction or other potential site destruction activities to be undertaken by government agencies could impact the historical significance of historic facilities or sites in Texas. Types of projects involved include demolition, renovation, and/or rehabilitation of buildings. Correspondence is generally between the staff of the Historical Commission and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Projects producing substantial or significant changes to a site are published in a report. Copies of final reports resulting from the review process are filed in the library of the Texas Historical Commission, see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final.

Plans of houses reviewed can found in the series HUD — Community Development Block Grant: Plans/maps/drawings.

Purpose:

These series were created in the course of Section 106 reviews done by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

The National Historic Preservation Act, Section 106, requires project sponsors to work with the state historic preservation officer to identify and minimize impacts to historic properties due to federal construction or similar projects, such as building new roads, reservoirs, municipal waste water treatment facilities, and making improvements to county housing projects. The Texas Historical Commission serves as the state historic preservation office and conducts the reviews. If the Historical Commission determines the proposed project will impact a historic or archeological site, they will work with the sponsor to either try and change construction materials or methods, move important buildings away from the site, or document the property or site before it is destroyed. For archeological sites this would include surveys of the site and possibly some excavation of materials to provide samples of artifact deposits. After the site has been documented, the project can proceed.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No records present prior to about 1970.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

Records concerning the proposed projects the commission is reviewing should be available in the agency undertaking the project.

Publications based on records:

Some project reviews result in reports.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: HUD — Community Development Block Grant: One-Phase construction clearances
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 116
Archival code: R
Retention: 25

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: HUD — Community Development Block Grant: Multi-year project clearances
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 117
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+25

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Archives and Library Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

Archeological reports resulting from Section 106 reviews are regularly deposited; exact titles and agencies affected were too numerous to list for each Section 106 series.

Appraisal decision:

These series document reviews done by the Historical Commission prior to construction or other potential site destruction activities to determine if the proposed activity will impact an archeological or historic site. Documentation of substantial changes made are published in a report and filed in the library of the Historical Commission and sent to the Publications Depository–see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final. While some activities may result in major changes to a site, many of these are routine. Since reports are prepared which document the more substantial work done in these endeavors this series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks column for these series — "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999." The agency is combining the two series listed above and renaming the series HUD — Community Development Block Grant: Project files.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: HUD — Community Development Block Grant: Plans/maps/drawings 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained in-house by the agency until closure of project, then stored offsite for 20 years. Current volume dates from c. 1970 to [ongoing], totaling 1 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains plans of houses reviewed in conjunction with reviews conducted by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470). Dates covered are c. 1970-[ongoing]. Reviews are conducted when construction or other potential site destruction activities to be undertaken by government agencies could impact the historical significance of historic facilities or sites in Texas. Types of projects involved include demolition, renovation, and/or rehabilitation of buildings. Projects producing substantial or significant changes to a site are published in a report. Copies of final reports resulting from the review process are filed in the library of the Texas Historical Commission, see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final.

Correspondence and Section 106 reviews concerning these houses can be found in the series HUD — Community Development Block Grant: One phase construction clearances and HUD — Community Development Block Grant: Multi-year project clearances.

Purpose:

This series was created to maintain maps and plans used in conjunction with Section 106 reviews done by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

The National Historic Preservation Act, Section 106, requires project sponsors to work with the state historic preservation officer to identify and minimize impacts to historic properties due to federal construction or similar projects, such as building new roads, reservoirs, municipal waste water treatment facilities, and making improvements to county housing projects. The Texas Historical Commission serves as the state historic preservation office and conducts the reviews. If the Historical Commission determines the proposed project will impact a historic or archeological site, they will work with the sponsor to either try and change construction materials or methods, move important buildings away from the site, or document the property or site before it is destroyed. For archeological sites this would include surveys of the site and possibly some excavation of materials to provide samples of artifact deposits. After the site has been documented, the project can proceed.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No records present prior to about 1970.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

Records concerning the proposed projects the commission is reviewing should be available in the agency undertaking the project.

Publications based on records:

Some project reviews result in reports.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: HUD — Community Develop. Block Grant: Plans/maps/drawings
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 119
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+20

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

Archeological reports resulting from Section 106 reviews are regularly deposited; exact titles and agencies affected were too numerous to list for each Section 106 series.

Appraisal decision:

This series consist of maps and/or plans used as reference materials by the agency when preparing the Section 106 reviews. These are not maps/plans done by the Historical Commission but are done by other agencies, such as the Texas Department of Transportation, the U.S. Geological Survey, etc. Because they are materials used as reference documentation instead of agency created materials, this series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks column for these series — "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: HUD — Subdivisions: Multi-phase construction clearances

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained in-house by the agency for 2 years after closure of the project, then stored offsite for 23 years. Current volume dates from c. 1970 to [ongoing], totaling 12 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains Section 106 reviews, correspondence and draft reports concerning reviews conducted by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470). Dates covered are c. 1970-[ongoing]. Reviews are conducted when construction or other potential site destruction activities to be undertaken by government agencies could impact the historical significance of historic facilities or sites in Texas. Types of projects involved include construction of housing projects, demolition, renovation, and/or rehabilitation of buildings. Correspondence is generally between the staff of the Historical Commission and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Projects producing substantial or significant changes to a site are published in a report. Copies of final reports resulting from the review process are filed in the library of the Texas Historical Commission, see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final.

Purpose:

This series was created in the course of Section 106 reviews done by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

The National Historic Preservation Act, Section 106, requires project sponsors to work with the state historic preservation officer to identify and minimize impacts to historic properties due to federal construction or similar projects, such as building new roads, reservoirs, municipal waste water treatment facilities, and making improvements to county housing projects. The Texas Historical Commission serves as the state historic preservation office and conducts the reviews. If the Historical Commission determines the proposed project will impact a historic or archeological site, they will work with the sponsor to either try and change construction materials or methods, move important buildings away from the site, or document the property or site before it is destroyed. For archeological sites this would include surveys of the site and possibly some excavation of materials to provide samples of artifact deposits. After the site has been documented, the project can proceed.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No records present prior to about 1970.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

Records concerning the proposed projects the commission is reviewing should be available in the agency undertaking the project.

Publications based on records:

Some project reviews result in reports.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: HUD — Subdivisions: Multi-phase construction clearances
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 121
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+25

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Archives and Library Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

Archeological reports resulting from Section 106 reviews are regularly deposited; exact titles and agencies affected were too numerous to list for each Section 106 series.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents reviews done by the Historical Commission prior to construction or other potential site destruction activities to determine if the proposed activity will impact an archeological or historic site. Documentation of substantial changes made are published in a report and filed in the library of the Historical Commission and sent to the Publications Depository–see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final. While some activities may result in major changes to a site, many of these are routine. Since reports are prepared which document the more substantial work done in these endeavors this series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks column for these series — "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999." The agency is renaming the series HUD — Subdivisions: Project files.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: HUD — Urban Development Action Grant: Comment made, major projects 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained in-house by the agency for 2 years after closure of the project, then stored offsite for 23 years. Current volume dates from c. 1970 to [ongoing], totaling 4 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains Section 106 reviews, correspondence and draft reports concerning reviews conducted by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470). Dates covered are c. 1970-[ongoing]. Reviews are conducted when construction or other potential site destruction activities to be undertaken by government agencies could impact the historical significance of historic facilities or sites in Texas. Types of projects involved include construction of housing projects, demolition, renovation, and/or rehabilitation of buildings. Correspondence is generally between the staff of the Historical Commission and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Projects producing substantial or significant changes to a site are published in a report. Copies of final reports resulting from the review process are filed in the library of the Texas Historical Commission, see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final.

Plans of buildings reviewed can be found in the series HUD — Urban Development Action Grant: Plans/maps/drawings.

Purpose:

This series was created in the course of Section 106 reviews done by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

The National Historic Preservation Act, Section 106, requires project sponsors to work with the state historic preservation officer to identify and minimize impacts to historic properties due to federal construction or similar projects, such as building new roads, reservoirs, municipal waste water treatment facilities, and making improvements to county housing projects. The Texas Historical Commission serves as the state historic preservation office and conducts the reviews. If the Historical Commission determines the proposed project will impact a historic or archeological site, they will work with the sponsor to either try and change construction materials or methods, move important buildings away from the site, or document the property or site before it is destroyed. For archeological sites this would include surveys of the site and possibly some excavation of materials to provide samples of artifact deposits. After the site has been documented, the project can proceed.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No records present prior to about 1970.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

Records concerning the proposed projects the commission is reviewing should be available in the agency undertaking the project.

Publications based on records:

Some project reviews result in reports.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: HUD — Urban Development Action Grant: Comments made, major projects
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 123
Archival code: R
Retention: 25

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Archives and Library Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

Archeological reports resulting from Section 106 reviews are regularly deposited; exact titles and agencies affected were too numerous to list for each Section 106 series.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents reviews done by the Historical Commission prior to construction or other potential site destruction activities to determine if the proposed activity will impact an archeological or historic site. Documentation of substantial changes made are published in a report and filed in the library of the Historical Commission and sent to the Publications Depository–see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final. While some activities may result in major changes to a site, many of these are routine. Since reports are prepared which document the more substantial work done in these endeavors this series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks column for these series — "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999." The agency is renaming the series HUD — Urban Development Action Grant: Project files.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: HUD — Urban Development Action Grant: Plans/maps/drawings 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained in-house by the agency until closure of the project, then stored offsite for 20 years. Current volume dates from c. 1970 to [ongoing], totaling 4 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains plans of buildings reviewed in conjunction with reviews conducted by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470). Dates covered are c. 1970-[ongoing]. Reviews are conducted when construction or other potential site destruction activities to be undertaken by government agencies could impact the historical significance of historic facilities or sites in Texas. Types of projects involved include construction of housing projects, demolition, renovation, and/or rehabilitation of buildings. Projects producing substantial or significant changes to a site are published in a report. Copies of final reports resulting from the review process are filed in the library of the Texas Historical Commission, see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final.

Correspondence and Section 106 reviews concerning these projects can be found in the series HUD — Urban Development Action Grant: Comment made, major projects.

Purpose:

This series was created to maintain maps and plans used in conjunction with Section 106 reviews done by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

The National Historic Preservation Act, Section 106, requires project sponsors to work with the state historic preservation officer to identify and minimize impacts to historic properties due to federal construction or similar projects, such as building new roads, reservoirs, municipal waste water treatment facilities, and making improvements to county housing projects. The Texas Historical Commission serves as the state historic preservation office and conducts the reviews. If the Historical Commission determines the proposed project will impact a historic or archeological site, they will work with the sponsor to either try and change construction materials or methods, move important buildings away from the site, or document the property or site before it is destroyed. For archeological sites this would include surveys of the site and possibly some excavation of materials to provide samples of artifact deposits. After the site has been documented, the project can proceed.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No records present prior to about 1970.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

Records concerning the proposed projects the commission is reviewing should be available in the agency undertaking the project.

Publications based on records:

Some project reviews result in reports.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: HUD — Urban Development Action Grant: Plans/maps/drawings
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 125
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+20

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

Archeological reports resulting from Section 106 reviews are regularly deposited; exact titles and agencies affected were too numerous to list for each Section 106 series.

Appraisal decision:

This series consist of maps and/or plans used as reference materials by the agency when preparing the Section 106 reviews. These are not maps/plans done by the Historical Commission but are done by other agencies, such as the Texas Department of Transportation, the U.S. Geological Survey, etc. Because they are materials used as reference documentation instead of agency created materials, this series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks column for these series — "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: National Park Service: Land/Park Management plan

and

National Park Service: Property rehabilitation or acquisition 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained in-house by the agency for 2 years, then stored offsite for 23 years. Current volume dates from c. 1970 to [ongoing], totaling 4 cubic ft.

Description:

These series contain Section 106 reviews, correspondence and draft reports concerning reviews conducted by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470). Dates covered are c. 1970-[ongoing]. Reviews are conducted when construction or other potential site destruction activities to be undertaken by government agencies could impact the historical significance of historic facilities or sites in Texas. Types of projects involved include development of hike and bike trails and campgrounds. Correspondence is generally between the staff of the Historical Commission and the U.S. National Park Service. Projects producing substantial or significant changes to a site are published in a report. Copies of final reports resulting from the review process are filed in the library of the Texas Historical Commission, see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final.

Purpose:

These series were created in the course of Section 106 reviews done by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

The National Historic Preservation Act, Section 106, requires project sponsors to work with the state historic preservation officer to identify and minimize impacts to historic properties due to federal construction or similar projects, such as building new roads, reservoirs, municipal waste water treatment facilities, and making improvements to county housing projects. The Texas Historical Commission serves as the state historic preservation office and conducts the reviews. If the Historical Commission determines the proposed project will impact a historic or archeological site, they will work with the sponsor to either try and change construction materials or methods, move important buildings away from the site, or document the property or site before it is destroyed. For archeological sites this would include surveys of the site and possibly some excavation of materials to provide samples of artifact deposits. After the site has been documented, the project can proceed.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by park name.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No records present prior to about 1970.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

Records concerning the proposed projects the commission is reviewing should be available in the agency undertaking the project.

Publications based on records:

Some project reviews result in reports.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: National Park Service: Land/Park Management plan
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 145
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+15

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: National Park Service: Property rehabilitation or acquisition
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 146
Archival code: R
Retention: 25

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Archives and Library Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

Archeological reports resulting from Section 106 reviews are regularly deposited; exact titles and agencies affected were too numerous to list for each Section 106 series.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents reviews done by the Historical Commission prior to construction or other potential site destruction activities to determine if the proposed activity will impact an archeological or historic site. Documentation of substantial changes made are published in a report and filed in the library of the Historical Commission and sent to the Publications Depository–see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final. While some activities may result in major changes to a site, many of these are routine. Since reports are prepared which document the more substantial work done in these endeavors this series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks column for these series — "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999." The agency is renaming this series National Park Service: Project files.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: National Resources Conservation Service: Comment made, major projects 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: about 0.5 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:

Retained in-house by the agency for 2 years after closure of the project, then stored offsite for 23 years. Current volume dates from about 1996 to present day, totaling 2 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains Section 106 reviews, correspondence and draft reports concerning reviews conducted by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470). Dates covered are 1996-[ongoing]. Reviews are conducted when construction or other potential site destruction activities to be undertaken by government agencies could impact the historical significance of historic facilities or sites in Texas. Types of projects involved include dam and watershed projects. Correspondence is generally between the staff of the Historical Commission and the U.S. National Resources Conservation Service. Projects producing substantial or significant changes to a site are published in a report. Copies of final reports resulting from the review process are filed in the library of the Texas Historical Commission, see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final.

Purpose:

This series was created in the course of Section 106 reviews done by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

The National Historic Preservation Act, Section 106, requires project sponsors to work with the state historic preservation officer to identify and minimize impacts to historic properties due to federal construction or similar projects, such as building new roads, reservoirs, municipal waste water treatment facilities, and making improvements to county housing projects. The Texas Historical Commission serves as the state historic preservation office and conducts the reviews. If the Historical Commission determines the proposed project will impact a historic or archeological site, they will work with the sponsor to either try and change construction materials or methods, move important buildings away from the site, or document the property or site before it is destroyed. For archeological sites this would include surveys of the site and possibly some excavation of materials to provide samples of artifact deposits. After the site has been documented, the project can proceed.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by project name.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No records prior to about 1996.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

Records concerning the proposed projects the commission is reviewing should be available in the agency undertaking the project.

Publications based on records:

Some project reviews result in reports.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: National Resources Conservation Service: Comment made, major projects
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 148
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+25

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Archives and Library Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

Archeological reports resulting from Section 106 reviews are regularly deposited; exact titles and agencies affected were too numerous to list for each Section 106 series.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents reviews done by the Historical Commission prior to construction or other potential site destruction activities to determine if the proposed activity will impact an archeological or historic site. Documentation of substantial changes made are published in a report and filed in the library of the Historical Commission and sent to the Publications Depository–see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final. While some activities may result in major changes to a site, many of these are routine. Since reports are prepared which document the more substantial work done in these endeavors this series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks column for these series — "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999." The agency is renaming this series National Resources Conservation Service: Project files.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Office of Surface Mining and Reclamation/RRC: Comment made, major projects/mines 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained in-house by the agency for 2 years after closure of the project, then stored offsite for 23 years. Current volume dates from c. 1970 to [ongoing], totaling 4 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains Section 106 reviews, correspondence and draft reports concerning reviews conducted by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470). Dates covered are c. 1970-[ongoing]. Reviews are conducted when construction or other potential site destruction activities to be undertaken by government agencies could impact the historical significance of historic facilities or sites in Texas. Types of projects involved include construction or alterations to mines. Correspondence is generally between the staff of the Historical Commission and the U.S. Office of Surface Mining and Reclamation. Projects producing substantial or significant changes to a site are published in a report. Copies of final reports resulting from the review process are filed in the library of the Texas Historical Commission, see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final.

Purpose:

This series was created in the course of Section 106 reviews done by the Texas Historical Commission in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

The National Historic Preservation Act, Section 106, requires project sponsors to work with the state historic preservation officer to identify and minimize impacts to historic properties due to federal construction or similar projects, such as building new roads, reservoirs, municipal waste water treatment facilities, and making improvements to county housing projects. The Texas Historical Commission serves as the state historic preservation office and conducts the reviews. If the Historical Commission determines the proposed project will impact a historic or archeological site, they will work with the sponsor to either try and change construction materials or methods, move important buildings away from the site, or document the property or site before it is destroyed. For archeological sites this would include surveys of the site and possibly some excavation of materials to provide samples of artifact deposits. After the site has been documented, the project can proceed.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by mine name.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No records present prior to about 1970.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

Records concerning the proposed projects the commission is reviewing should be available in the agency undertaking the project.

Publications based on records:

Some project reviews result in reports.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Office of Surface Mining and Reclam./RRC: Comments made, major projects/minutes
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 151
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+25

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Archives and Library Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

Archeological reports resulting from Section 106 reviews are regularly deposited; exact titles and agencies affected were too numerous to list for each Section 106 series.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents reviews done by the Historical Commission prior to construction or other potential site destruction activities to determine if the proposed activity will impact an archeological or historic site. Documentation of substantial changes made are published in a report and filed in the library of the Historical Commission and sent to the Publications Depository–see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports - Final. While some activities may result in major changes to a site, many of these are routine. Since reports are prepared which document the more substantial work done in these endeavors this series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks column for these series — "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999." The agency is renaming this series Office of Surface Mining and Reclam./RRC: Project files.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Texas Historic Preservation Plan Files  

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? Yes
Replaced by: new series not yet on the schedule

Ongoing record series? No
Annual accumulation:

Agency holdings:

Project was discontinued several years ago, the agency has 152 cubic ft. of files, 76 of those boxes are stored offsite. According to the retention schedule they are keeping the records for 20 years after the close of the project. Dates of these records are 1970-1980.

Description:

The records in this series consist of obsolete computer punch cards and computer printouts, dating 1970-1980. They are listed as four separate series on the retention schedule, but treated by the agency as one series. These records were created as a project to enter data about the state’s historic sites into a database using an old punch card system and now obsolete computer software and hardware. Data from the project has been rekeyed and entered into a large online database, the Texas Historic Sites Atlas.

The Texas Historic Sites Atlas is a large database which features information on more than 200,000 historic site records, providing state historical marker inscriptions, National Register of Historic Places entries and property photos, neighborhood survey records of historic properties, museum exhibits, sawmill records from 52 East Texas counties, and maps of sites featured in the database. Information from the state archeological landmarks files is due to be added shortly. The Atlas is currently available on the web site of the Texas Historical Commission and can be searched by county, site name, or address.

Purpose:

These records were created to serve as an electronic reference tool for accessing information about Texas historic sites.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints:

Equipment on which to run the initial punch cards and software to read them is no longer available at the Historical Commission.

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records:

Prehistory Sites in Texas, archeology report no. 28.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:


Title: Texas Historic Preservation Plan: Files — County
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 170
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+20

Title: Texas Historic Preservation Plan: Files — Printouts
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 171
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+20

Title: Texas Historic Preservation Plan: Files - Administrative
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 172
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+20

Title: Texas Historic Preservation Plan: Files — Shipwrecks
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 173
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+20

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

The materials for this database are listed in four series on the schedule, but they are all part of one series, just separated by type or topic, so they are being appraised as one series. The computer punch cards have no value at all and data in the computer printouts contain data gathered from existing agency series and can also be found in the electronic database now operated as an online database, the Texas Historic Sites Atlas.

I recommend the original materials in this series–punch cards and computer printouts be appraised to be non-archival. The data gathered from this project was gathered from existing series–National Register files and state historical marker files primarily, which are still housed at the Historical Commission. This is just a reference source for information found in those and other existing files. Because these are obsolete series containing non-archival records they have been appraised to be non-archival and should be removed from the schedule. The items in these series will have met their original retention period of AC+20 in one year, then they can be destroyed.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Antiquities permits, Final

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: one cubic ft.

Agency holdings:

Retained in-house by the agency until closure of the project, then stored offsite for 30 years. Current volume dates from 1970 to [ongoing], totaling about 30 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains antiquities permits, permit applications, and correspondence, mostly between the Historical Commission and the principal investigator of the project. Dates are 1970-[ongoing]. Antiquities permits are issued to principal investigators performing archeological surveys for projects requiring such permits due to rules in the Texas Antiquities Code. Final reports resulting from the surveys are part of the series Archeological survey site forms and reports — Final. These reports are published and copies are placed in the library of the Texas Historical Commission and copies are sent to the State Publications Depository Program.

Purpose:

The permits are a legal requirement of the Texas Antiquities Code and are issued to authorize surveys or excavation of archeological sites to record data that would be lost to construction or other damaging activities to the site.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

The Texas Historical Commission, through the Archeology Division, issues antiquities permits for activities that disturb archeological sites on land owned by the state or other political subdivisions. The Antiquities Code of Texas requires construction or other such projects get a permit from the Historical Commission before altering, damaging, destroying, salvaging, or excavating archeological sites. Projects requiring these permits include construction of highways, reservoirs, and recreational facilities; and oil and gas exploration. The Historical Commission can deny or stop projects that threaten to destroy a significant site or landmark. If a project is likely to impact a site the project sponsor must get a permit to arrange for an archeological survey. If the survey indicates it is a potentially significant site, the project sponsor must get a permit to conduct an archeological excavation to retrieve and record scientific data. After the excavation is completed the project can continue. The State Marine Archeologist reviews plans for construction projects which affect underwater archeological sites and makes recommendations on permit applications to the Historical Commission

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Numerically by permit number.

Access constraints:

Yes. These are closed until completely researched to protect the site. V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 442.007(f); and V.T.C.A., Texas Natural Resources Code, Section 191.994(a-c) gives the Historical Commission the authority to determine what cultural resource information is sensitive and what information needs to be restricted due to potential dangers to those resources.

Access during the permit issuance period is limited to the PI (principal investigator), the sponsor, and the owner.

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? None

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records:

Reports resulting from the surveys and/or eventual excavations are published and sent to the Publications Depository.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Antiquities permits, final (completed)
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 231
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+30

Title: Closed or cancelled permits
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 232
Archival code: R
Retention AC+30

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

Archeological reports resulting from work done through the issuance of antiquities permits are regularly deposited; exact titles and agencies affected were too numerous to list here.

Appraisal decision:

The antiquities permits are listed in two separate series on the schedule–final (complete) permits and closed permits. The agency actually files them in one series, so they are being appraised as one series for the appraisal report. The information in the files documents a number of surveys and excavations of archeological sites in the state. However, the results of all of these surveys and excavations are published and sent to the State Publications Depository Program, see the series Archeological survey site forms and reports — final, so this series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks column for these series — "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999." Because the permits in the two series are filed together, the agency should combine the series on the retention schedule, listing it as Antiquities permits, final. Because these are confidential, they should consider putting a C security code on it.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Litigation files 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? Yes
Replaced by: none

Ongoing record series? No
Annual accumulation:

Agency holdings:

The agency recently transferred these files to the Archives and Information Services Division.

Description:

This series contains legal documents and correspondence concerning litigation involving the Texas Antiquities Committee (TAC). Dates covered are 1990 and 1992-1993. One set of files consists only of letters from the state marine archeologist to professional archeologists and archeological societies about the TAC filing an Amicus brief re: the Lady Elgin lawsuit, dating 1990. This was a suit involving a shipwreck, the Lady Elgin, filed by the National Trust, and archeological societies which were offering to sign on to show their support for the new federal shipwreck law. The National Trust decided not to allow the TAC to sign on.

The other set of files concerns a permit application received by the TAC from the city of Austin to allow for the placement of a wastewater line through part of Zilker Park in Austin, dating 1992-1993. This case, know as the Save Our Springs case, also involved a number of related issues involving Barton Springs and future development over the watershed in the Austin area. The TAC’s involvement just concerned whether or not they would approve a permit to allow the wastewater line to be laid. The area in question has state archeological landmark status so the TAC is required to approve any changes (such as construction, laying pipes, etc.) which could damage the archeological deposits in the site. The hearings involving this issue were conducted for the TAC by the State Office of Administrative Hearings. The final ruling of the TAC is not present. The ruling should be available in the minutes of the committee.

Purpose:

These records were created in the course of litigation involving the Texas Antiquities Committee, primarily concerning the Save Our Springs permit hearings.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: The final decision by the Antiquities Committee is not present.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Litigation files
Series item number: 1.1.048
Agency item number: 20
Archival code: none
Retention: AC+3

Archival holdings:

Texas Antiquities Committee litigation files, 1990, 1992-1993, 0.3 cubic ft.
This series contains legal documents and correspondence concerning two lawsuits involving the Texas Antiquities Committee, dating 1990 and 1992-1993. The first involved signing on to an existing suit involving a shipwreck, the Lady Elgin, filed by the National Trust, dating 1990. The other involved a hearing resulting from a request for a permit to lay wastewater lines through an area designated as a state archeological landmark in Austin, Texas, dating 1992-1993.

Appraisal decision:

These files contain materials from litigation involving the Texas Antiquities Committee. There is not enough material present for the Lady Elgin lawsuit to document the TAC’s involvement or interest in this lawsuit except for the fact they tried to get involved and were initially unsuccessful. Later involvement by the TAC is unknown. I do not recommend keeping the file on this lawsuit. The bulk of the materials concern a permit application hearing. While this was not a lawsuit against the agency, there was public sentiment involved–both to not allow this to happen and to approve the issuance of the permit. The Save Our Springs case received widespread attention in the media during 1993, but it involves much more than just a request to lay wastewater lines. The major issues concerned future growth in Austin, especially over the watershed area and how that would affect Barton Springs, the water quality, wildlife, etc. Because this is a specific case involving one permit application, we do not see the need to maintain these records. Discussion of the permit application and the decision reached by the committee should be found in the minutes of the committee. This is sufficient coverage of this event. For the Lady Elgin files, there is not enough material present to document the TAC’s involvement or interest, and this was a federal case.

These files have been appraised to be non-archival. They can be offered back to the agency or discarded as they have fulfilled their retention period. Furthermore, the agency can remove this series from the retention schedule as the Antiquities Committee no longer exists and is no longer involved in litigation.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: LaSalle project files 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: about 1 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency until the project is completed according to agency staff. This series is not on the schedule, so a definite retention period has not been set. Current holdings are 1995-[ongoing], totaling about 12 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains correspondence, clippings, press releases, photographs, negatives, slides, digital videotapes, and survey data forms on floppy disks. Dates covered are 1995-[ongoing]. All the materials except the survey data forms are filed in large notebooks. The data forms are kept only on floppy disks. They are due to be transferred to CD-ROM in the near future. The agency is currently maintaining two sets of the notebooks, one held at the agency, one to be put in storage as a backup copy.

These records document the discovery and excavation of the Belle, one of the ships used by the French explorer Robert Cavalier, Sieur de La Salle, and the location and excavation of the site of Fort Saint Louis, the fort established by La Salle in 1685. The Belle was wrecked along the Texas coast in 1686. The site of the wreck was discovered in 1995 by a team of researchers led by state marine archeologist, Barto Arnold of the Historical Commission. Excavations of the site were undertaken by the commission in 1995. Artifacts from the site are currently undergoing conservation treatments and will be put on public display upon completion of the project. The archeological staff of the commission is currently excavating a site believed to be Fort Saint Louis, which was discovered in 1996.

Purpose:

These records are created while administering the La Salle project, which is to find, retrieve, and interpret materials from the Belle and Fort Saint Louis.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Topical and chronological

Access constraints:

Yes. Some of the materials in these files are restricted to protect the sites. V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 442.007(f); and V.T.C.A., Texas Natural Resources Code, Section 191.994(a-c) gives the Historical Commission the authority to determine what cultural resource information is sensitive and what information needs to be restricted due to potential dangers to those resources.

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None yet.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule: Not on schedule.

Suggested series data from state records retention schedule None

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents one of the most exciting archeological discoveries in recent years in Texas. The materials uncovered from the Belle and from Fort Saint Louis are providing first hand documentation of the French in Texas. These discoveries, especially the Belle, have received wide-spread attention and the results of the excavations will result in continuing historical interest in La Salle and the French period in Texas. Because of the evidential and informational value of these materials, both to historians and the general public, this series has been appraised to be archival. The series needs to be added to the retention schedule which an archival code of "A" and a retention of "AV"–administratively valuable. A note can be added to the Remarks section as follows: "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission." A note also needs to be added that states the survey data files are available only in electronic format.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Designated State Archeological Landmarks — Archeological sites 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? No
Annual accumulation: about 0.5 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency permanently. Current holdings date from 1969 to [ongoing], and total about 80 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains applications for state archeological landmark status, correspondence, and photographs of the sites nominated for landmark status. Dates covered are 1969-[ongoing]. The application will contain a narrative description and known history of the site and likely a description of the surrounding vicinity. Correspondence is primarily between the agency staff and the land owners or persons requesting the designation. Some information from the landmark files will soon to be added to the agency’s online database of historic sites, the Texas Historic Sites Atlas.

Purpose:

These records are created and maintained in the designation of state archeological landmarks. The materials are also used as research files by staff and others.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

The State Archeological Landmark (SAL) Program was established by the Antiquities Committee in the late 1970s to identify and protect historical properties. SAL status ensures that a property cannot be removed, altered, damaged, salvaged, or excavated without prior review and a antiquities permit. The designation of an SAL is recorded in the deed record and conveyed when the property is sold. To receive this designation archeological sites must meet the criteria established in the Texas Antiquities Code and buildings or structures must already be listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county

Access constraints:

Yes. Some of the information in these files is restricted to protect the site. V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 442.007(f); and V.T.C.A., Texas Natural Resources Code, Section 191.994(a-c) gives the Historical Commission the authority to determine what cultural resource information is sensitive and what information needs to be restricted due to potential dangers to those resources.

Access during the period landmarks are being designated is generally limited to contractors and archeological researchers in addition to staff.

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Designated State Archeological Landmarks — Archeological sites
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 239
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

This is a valuable source of information about Texas’ archeological sites, providing detailed data about the history and function of a site. While this information is soon to be available in the agency’s online database, these files contain informational value about these sites and need to be retained permanently in a paper format. This series has been appraised to be archival. Add an "A" code to the retention schedule and change the status to "AV"–administratively valuable. A note can be added to the Remarks section as follows: "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Archeological survey site forms and reports — Final 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency permanently in the library of the Historical Commission. Current holdings are over 5 cubic ft.

Description:

These are the final archeological reports resulting from surveys and/or excavations done as a result of the federal Section 106 reviews and/or rules in the Texas Antiquities Code requiring antiquities permits to be issued. Dates covered are c. 1970-[ongoing]. The reports were produced by the archeologists or archeological firms that carried out the surveys or excavations for the project sponsors. Microfilm of the reports is available through 1993, when the agency stopped filming the reports.

The series, Antiquities permits — Final, contains antiquities permits and related correspondence about the site which resulted in the production of some of these reports. There are numerous series that contain Section 106 reviews, correspondence, and draft reports, which resulted in the publication of some of the reports in this series. The Section 106 series are listed in the agency’s retention schedule by agency name, e.g. Department of the Army: Comment made.

Purpose:

These reports document surveying and excavation activities undertaken at archeological sites as a result of state and federal antiquities laws.

Agency program:

The Texas Antiquities Committee was created in 1969 by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

The Texas Historical Commission, through the Archeology Division, issues antiquities permits for activities that disturb archeological sites on land owned by the state or other political subdivisions. The Antiquities Code of Texas requires construction or other such projects get a permit from the Historical Commission before altering, damaging, destroying, salvaging, or excavating archeological sites. Projects requiring these permits include construction of highways, reservoirs, and recreational facilities; and oil and gas exploration. The Historical Commission can deny or stop projects that threaten to destroy a significant site or landmark. If a project is likely to impact a site the project sponsor must get a permit to arrange for an archeological survey. If the survey indicates it is a potentially significant site, the project sponsor must get a permit to conduct an archeological excavation to retrieve and record scientific data. After the excavation is completed the project can continue. The State Marine Archeologist reviews plans for construction projects which affect underwater archeological sites and makes recommendations on permit applications to the Historical Commission

The National Historic Preservation Act, Section 106, requires project sponsors to work with the state historic preservation officer to identify and minimize impacts to historic properties due to federal construction or similar projects, such as building new roads, reservoirs, municipal waste water treatment facilities, and making improvements to county housing projects. The Texas Historical Commission serves as the state historic preservation office and conducts the reviews. If the Historical Commission determines the proposed project will impact a historic or archeological site, they will work with the sponsor to either try and change construction materials or methods, move important buildings away from the site, or document the property or site before it is destroyed. For archeological sites this would include surveys of the site and possibly some excavation of materials to provide samples of artifact deposits. After the site has been documented, the project can proceed.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records:

These are reports that are published and distributed by the Texas Historical Commission.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Archeological survey site forms and reports — final [paper]
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 242A
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Title: Archeological survey site forms and reports — final [microfilm]
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 242B
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:

Some of the older reports are catalogued in the Texana collection of the Archives and Information Services Division.

Texas Documents Collection Holdings:

These reports are sent regularly to the Publications Depository Program and are cataloged and housed in the Texas Documents Collection.

Appraisal decision:

These reports provide a detailed account of the surveying and excavation activities undertaken at archeological sites as a result of state and federal antiquities laws. Many of the sites documented have since been destroyed leaving these reports as a comprehensive source of information about these sites. These reports contain significant evidential and informational value about the site and they have been appraised to be archival. Change the archival code to "A." Since the reports are regularly sent to the Publications Depository, that fulfills the archival requirement. A note needs to be added to the retention schedule for this series as follows: "The archival requirement of this series is fulfilled by sending copies to the Publications Depository."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Platoro Collection files 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? Yes
Replaced by: none

Ongoing record series? No
Annual accumulation:

Agency holdings:

The agency recently transferred these files to the Archives and Information Services Division. They still retain copies of the microfiche, 1970-1988, fractional.

Description:

This series contains legal materials (memorandums, orders, etc.), hearing transcripts, inventories of artifacts, minutes of the inventory committee meeting, correspondence, and an initial draft of rules and regulations for the Texas Antiquities Committee. Dates of the files are 1969-c. 1988. Topics discussed concern the discovery of a 1554 historic ship wreck by Platoro Limited, Inc., the filing of the suit by Texas, inventorying the artifacts, transferring the artifacts to the Texas Archeological Research lab for conservation, settlement of the suit, and the beginnings of the Texas Antiquities Committee.

In 1967 a company called Platoro Limited, Inc., discovered an ancient sea wreck off the Texas coast near Padre Island. They began excavating and retrieving artifacts until 1969 when the Texas Attorney General filed a suit asserting the artifacts belonged to Texas. The company began transferring the artifacts to the General Land Office (later to the Texas Archeological Research lab) and a committee was appointed by the court to inventory the artifacts. Later in 1969 Platoro filed a suit against Texas to reclaim title to the artifacts based on salvage law. The lawsuit went on for several years. In 1983 the U.S. District Court found for Platoro and ordered the state to turn over the artifacts. An appeals court reversed part of the decision saying the state could pay a monetary sum to the company as compensation and keep the artifacts. The state eventually paid a monetary award and kept the artifacts. The confused state of statutory law governing title to ancient sea wrecks and their artifacts prompted the enactment of the Texas Antiquities Code, effective September 1969 (Vernon’s Ann. Civ. St., Article 6145-9).

The artifacts and all records pertaining to the artifacts are currently housed at the Corpus Christi Museum of Science and History in Corpus Christi, Texas, except for a few field maps that are housed in the Archeology Division.

Purpose:

These records were created in the conduct of a lawsuit over the ownership of the artifacts from a 1554 shipwreck.

Agency program:

Texas Antiquities Committee was created by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session (1969). The Committee was initially composed of seven members–Director of the State Historical Survey Committee, Director of Parks and Wildlife Department, Commissioner of the General Land Office, State Archeologist (whose office was transferred in 1969 from the State Building Commission to the Texas State Historical Survey Committee), one professional archeologist from a recognized museum or institution of higher learning, one professional Texas historian, and the Director of the Texas Memorial Museum of the University of Texas. The makeup of the Committee when it expired in 1995 was a nine-member commission. It consisted of six ex-officio members, including the chairperson of the Texas Historical Commission or his/her designee, the State Archaeologist, the Director of the Parks and Wildlife Department, the Commissioner of the General Land Office, the State Engineer, and the Executive Director of the Texas Department of Water Resources. The three other members were appointed by the Governor with concurrence of the Senate, for two-year terms. These appointed members consisted of a professional historian, a professional archaeologist, and a professional museum director.

This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Texas Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: By type of material

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None known

Problems: To this date the agency has been unable to locate the microfiche.

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Platoro Collection files [paper]
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 243A
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Title: Platoro Collection files [microfiche]
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 243B
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:
Platoro files, 1969-1973, 1977, 1981-1984, 0.24 cubic ft.
This series contains legal materials (memorandum, orders, etc.), hearing transcripts, inventories of artifacts, minutes of the inventory committee meeting, correspondence, and an initial draft of rules and regulations for the Texas Antiquities Committee. Dates of the files are 1969-1973, 1977, 1981-1984.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents an important lawsuit and subsequent actions that led to the creation of the Texas Antiquities Code and the Texas Antiquities Committee. Because of the significance of the lawsuit and it’s resulting actions, this series has been appraised to be archival. This is an obsolete series and the paper records have already been transferred to the Library and Archives Commission so the paper series can be removed from the retention schedule of the agency. The microfiche can be kept by the Historical Commission as a convenience copy, perhaps in their library.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Archeological site files 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (formerly Office of the State Archeologist)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: several inches

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency permanently. Current holdings date from c. 1953-[ongoing] and total 12 cubic ft.

Description:

This series consists of correspondence, site survey forms, clippings, and other materials concerning archeological sites (prehistoric and historic) in the state. Dates covered are c. 1953-[ongoing]. Correspondence is typically between agency staff and land owners, stewards (avocational archeologists), and the general public.

Reports of surveys or excavations of some sites are published by the Office of the State Archeologist with copies sent to the library in the Historical Commission and the State Publications Depository Program. An earlier series of reports was done by the State Archeologist in the 1960s: State Building Commission, Archeological Program Reports, No. 1 — 17 (1966-1969).

A related series that contains documentation used in the reports, such as photos, maps, field notes, and artifact analysis, is the series Publication development files, housed in the Archeology Division.

Purpose:

These records are created and maintained to record data from and about archeological sites and track communication with land owners and others about the sites. The files are also used as reference materials for researchers and staff.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Office of the State Archeologist was created in 1965 as part of the State Building Commission. It was transferred to the Texas Historical Commission in 1969. The Office conducted a comprehensive statewide program to inventory, preserve, evaluate, and interpret the archeological resources of Texas. It also worked closely with a statewide network of avocational archeologists who assisted the office in preserving valuable sites and collections. The duties of the Office were recently combined with the duties of the Division of Antiquities Protection to become the Archeology Division of the Historical Commission.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county

Access constraints:

Yes. Some of the information in these files may be restricted to protect the identity and/or integrity of the site. V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 442.007(f); and V.T.C.A., Texas Natural Resources Code, Section 191.994(a-c) gives the Historical Commission the authority to determine what cultural resource information is sensitive and what information needs to be restricted due to potential dangers to those resources.

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? None

Gaps:

The agency indicates it has site files back to about 1953; these may be part of a different archeological survey project.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records:

Reports of surveys or excavations of some sites are published by the Office of the State Archeologist of the Historical Commission, generally from 1970-[ongoing]. Earlier reports were produced by the State Building Commission as Archeological Program Reports No. 1 (1966) — No. 17 (1969).

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Archeological site files
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 1
Archival code: R
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:

Several reports are present in the Texana collection, including:
State Building Commission. Archeological Program Reports No. 1 (1966) — No. 17 (1969)
and a few archeological reports from the Office of the State Archeologist of the Texas Historical Commission.

Texas Documents Collection:

Archeological Reports of surveys or excavations published by the Office of the State Archeologist, Texas Historical Commission, dating from 1970-[ongoing].

Appraisal decision:

This series contains a significant amount of information about archeological sites in Texas. Data gathered from some sites is published in reports, but not all sites. The files also contain additional data that may pertain to the site after the report is published, such as information from the general public or clippings, brochures detailing changes to the site and/or the surrounding vicinity which could affect the site. The material in this series contains evidential and informational value about these sites. This series has been appraised to be archival, in spite of the fact that reports are present which summarize some of the data. Change the "R" to an "A" code and change the retention period to AV–administratively valuable. A note can be added to the Remarks section as follows: "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Publication development files 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (formerly Office of the State Archeologist)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency until superceded or their purpose is served. Current holdings are from c. 1953-[ongoing] totaling 12 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains any information pertaining to reports of surveys and/or excavations at archeological sites written by the Office of the State Archeologist, including drafts, illustrations, maps, photo logs, field notes, and artifact analyses. Dates covered are c. 1953-[ongoing]. Most, but not all, of these reports were published with copies sent to the library in the Historical Commission and the State Publications Depository Program. An earlier series of reports was done by the State Archeologist in the 1960s: State Building Commission. Archeological Program Reports, No. 1 — 17 (1966-1969).

A series containing the initial information gathered from the archeological sites, including site survey forms, correspondence, and clippings, is the series Archeological site files.

Purpose:

These records are created and maintained in surveying and excavation activities of the Office of the State Archeologist (now part of the Archeology Division).

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Office of the State Archeologist was created in 1965 as part of the State Building Commission. It was transferred to the Texas Historical Commission in 1969. The Office conducted a comprehensive statewide program to inventory, preserve, evaluate, and interpret the archeological resources of Texas. It also worked closely with a statewide network of avocational archeologists who assisted the office in preserving valuable sites and collections. The duties of the Office were recently combined with the duties of the Division of Antiquities Protection to become the Archeology Division of the Historical Commission.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: By project name.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps:

The agency indicates it has reports back to about 1953, these may be part of a different archeological survey project.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records:

Reports of surveys or excavations of some sites are published by the Office of the State Archeologist of the Historical Commission, generally from 1970-[ongoing]. Earlier reports were produced by the State Building Commission as Archeological Program Reports No. 1 (1966) — No. 17 (1969).

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Publication development files
Series item number: 1.1.028
Agency item number: 3
Archival code: R
Retention: US/PS

Archival holdings:

Several reports are present in the Texana collection, including:
State Building Commission, Archeological Program Reports No. 1 (1966) — No. 17 (1969)
and a few archeological reports from the Office of the State Archeologist of the Texas Historical Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

Archeological Reports of surveys or excavations published by the Office of the State Archeologist, Texas Historical Commission, dating from 1970-[ongoing].

Appraisal decision:

These files seem to be an extension of a related series, Archeological site files as they contain materials used in reports which were based on data in that series. This series contains supporting documentation used in the archeological reports in addition to photos and drafts that are more commonly found in this series. The other documentation–artifact analysis, field notes, maps, and illustrations are part of the evidentiary record of the sites and should be retained. The agency staff has said not all the reports prepared were published and distributed. Because of the evidential and informational value of the documentation present in this series it has been appraised to be archival. Change the "R" on the schedule to an "A" code and the retention period to AV–administratively valuable. A note can be added to the Remarks section as follows: "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Stewardship program files 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (formerly Office of the State Archeologist)

Contact: Lillie Thompson
463-1568

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: about 2 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency as long as administratively valuable. Current holdings date from 1984-[ongoing] and total 8 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains correspondence and surveys concerning various archeological sites. Dates covered are 1984-[ongoing]. Stewards are volunteers from across Texas who perform archeology work at no cost to the state. These files are the results of the work of the stewards and they also document their interaction with the Historical Commission. Some of the work done by stewards is published in their annual periodical, The Steward, a publication of the Texas Archeological Stewardship Network. This periodical began in 1993 as The Cache. Starting with volume 4, the periodical changed its name to The Steward.

Purpose:

These records are created and maintained to administer the stewardship program of the Archeology Division and to record data obtained from the stewards for archeological sites.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Office of the State Archeologist was created in 1965 as part of the State Building Commission. It was transferred to the Texas Historical Commission in 1969. The Office conducted a comprehensive statewide program to inventory, preserve, evaluate, and interpret the archeological resources of Texas. It also worked closely with a statewide network of avocational archeologists who assisted the office in preserving valuable sites and collections. The duties of the Office were recently combined with the duties of the Division of Antiquities Protection to become the Archeology Division of the Historical Commission.

The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Texas Antiquities Code (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical

Access constraints:

Yes. Some of the information may be restricted to protect the identity and/or the integrity of the site. V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 442.007(f); and V.T.C.A., Texas Natural Resources Code, Section 191.994(a-c) gives the Historical Commission the authority to determine what cultural resource information is sensitive and what information needs to be restricted due to potential dangers to those resources.

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No records are present prior to 1984.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records:

The Cache, volumes 1,2,3; The Steward, volume 4 - ongoing. This is a publication of the Texas Archeological Stewardship Network.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Stewardship program files
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 6
Archival code: R
Retention: PS

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

The Cache, volumes 1-3; The Steward, volume 4 and ongoing.

Appraisal decision:

The materials in this series document work done by avocational archeologists for the Office of the State Archeologist, now the Archeology Division. Although there is an annual publication that documents some of their work, not all of it is published there. Because of the scientific value of documenting archeological sites, especially those that may be on private land, and in some cases, sites that have been destroyed, this series has been appraised to be archival. Change the "R" code on the schedule to "A" and the retention period to AV–administratively valuable. A note can be added to the Remarks section as follows: "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Marker program development 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
History Programs Division (Local History Programs)

Contact: Egina Reyes
463-5853

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for AC+50 years, according to the retention schedule. Current holdings are dated 1960-[ongoing] and total 4 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains correspondence, records concerning legal issues, bid files and specifications for the markers, records with the foundry which makes the markers, old marker applications, information from other state marker programs, research materials, special project files, inscriptions by topic, and the minutes and agenda from the meetings of the State Marker Review Board. Dates covered are 1960-[ongoing]. The records concern the Official Texas Historical Marker Program and those properties which are also designated as Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. The program files containing the narrative histories and other materials about individual markers are in the series Marker files.

Purpose:

These records are created and maintained to administer the Official Texas Historical Marker Program and to document the actions of the State Marker Review Board.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The History Programs Division operates the National Register Program and the Local History Program. This division is compiling a statewide inventory of Texas properties significant in American history, architecture, or culture. It nominates the most significant properties to the National Register of Historic Places. It assists designated cities with developing ordinances and programs to preserve local landmarks and also provides other assistance to county officials, nonprofit heritage organizations, and individuals in preserving cultural and historic resources of the state. It operates the Texas Historical Marker program and administers the Sam Rayburn House Museum in Bonham, Texas.

The Official Texas Historical Marker program began in 1962, although markers were placed at historic sites in Texas beginning in 1936 when the Texas Centennial Commission placed more than 1,500 granite markers during the Texas Centennial in 1936. The subject markers programs and building medallion programs began in 1962 to document Texas’ significant historic events, persons, sites, and buildings. Whether a marker is granted or not is decided by the State Marker Review Board, a subcommittee of the Texas Historical Commission. If the board approves the application for a marker, the Historical Commission staff prepares a marker inscription with input from the applicant. Markers are paid for by the sponsor, group, or individual that submits the application. The Texas Department of Highways and Transportation then erects the marker.

Any marker which has received a medallion or both a medallion and a building marker are designated as Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks (RTHL). Some properties with subject markers have also been designated as RTHLs. Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks are properties that have been designated by the State Marker Review Board as particularly significant in the architectural history of the state. This is a permanent designation and cannot be transferred to another structure. The exterior appearance of RTHL buildings are to retain their historical integrity after designation. Any architectural or structural changes to be made to these buildings are to be reviewed by the Division of Architecture for compliance with the provisions of V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442, Section 442.006(f). If appreciable or unwarranted changes are observed to have been made to a landmark structure, the designation and marker may be withdrawn by the State Marker Review Board.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Topical

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None known

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Marker program development
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 2
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+50

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

The historical marker program is a major function of the Historical Commission, one of their longest running programs. These files document the history of the historical marker program, and the actions of the State Marker Review Board–the board that decides which buildings/sites get markers. Because of the informational value in this series about the marker programs and the evidential value in the minutes of the Review Board, this series has been appraised to be archival. Change the archival code to "A" and the retention period to AV–administratively valuable. A note can be added to the Remarks section as follows: "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission." However, copies of the minutes and agenda of the State Marker Review Board need to be transferred as soon as is convenient to the Library and Archives Commission and yearly thereafter.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Cemetery program development 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
History Programs Division (Local History Programs)

Contact: Egina Reyes
463-5853

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: about 6 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency until purpose served, according to the retention schedule. Current holdings of the agency are 1985-[ongoing] and total 30 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains historic cemetery designation files, cemetery technical files, county cemetery files, Oakwood Cemetery (Austin) files, and the Texas State Cemetery Restoration files. Dates covered are 1985-[ongoing]. Materials in these files provide a history of the cemeteries, include deed records, and some include names of people interred in the cemetery. The Historical Commission has recently established the Historic Texas Cemetery Designation Program, which provides this historic designation to private, city or county-owned cemeteries.

Purpose:

These records are created to maintain information gathered on historic cemeteries in Texas, including the restoration work done on the Texas State Cemetery.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The History Programs Division operates the National Register Program and the Local History Program. This division is compiling a statewide inventory of Texas properties significant in American history, architecture, or culture. It nominates the most significant properties to the National Register of Historic Places. It assists designated cities with developing ordinances and programs to preserve local landmarks and also provides other assistance to county officials, nonprofit heritage organizations, and individuals in preserving cultural and historic resources of the state. It operates the Texas Historical Marker program and administers the Sam Rayburn House Museum in Bonham, Texas. It recently has begun administering the Historic Cemetery Designation Program. This program provides this historic designation to private, city or county-owned cemeteries.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Typically by county, otherwise alphabetically.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None listed

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Cemetery program development
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 3
Archival code: R
Retention: PS

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents historic cemeteries in Texas and the restoration of the Texas State Cemetery in Austin. There is ongoing genealogical and informational value in cemetery records which warrants their permanent retention. Also the historic importance and significance of the Texas State Cemetery warrants the permanent retention of the restoration files for that project. This series has been appraised to archival. Change the archival code to "A" and the retention period to AV–administratively valuable. A note can be added to the Remarks section as follows: "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission." The state cemetery restoration files be transferred at the agency’s earliest convenience to the Library and Archives Commission since the restoration is completed.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Development of county programs 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
History Programs Division (Local History Programs)

Contact: Egina Reyes
463-5853

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency until purpose served, according to the retention schedule. Current holdings are 1965-[ongoing] and total two cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains newsletters for county historical commissions from the Historical Commission, survey forms, THC visitation to county judges project materials, general information about the county historical commissions, and volunteer hour reports. Dates covered are 1965-[ongoing].

Purpose:

These records are created in the course of agency work and coordination with county historical commissions through the History Programs Division.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The History Programs Division operates the National Register Program and the Local History Program. This division is compiling a statewide inventory of Texas properties significant in American history, architecture, or culture. It nominates the most significant properties to the National Register of Historic Places. It assists designated cities with developing ordinances and programs to preserve local landmarks and also provides other assistance to county officials, nonprofit heritage organizations, and individuals in preserving cultural and historic resources of the state. It operates the Texas Historical Marker program and administers the Sam Rayburn House Museum in Bonham, Texas.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Topically

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None identified.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Development of county programs
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 7
Archival code: R
Retention: PS

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

This series contains administrative files concerning this division’s work with county historical commissions. The files are fairly routine and do not contain significant informational value to warrant archival retention. This series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks column for these series — "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Sam Rayburn House 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
History Programs Division (Local History Programs)

Contact: Egina Reyes
463-5853

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for the life of the asset, according to the retention schedule. Current holdings are 1971-[ongoing], totaling 4 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains correspondence, conservation work reports, inventories, newsletters, activity reports, Friends housing agreement, master plan, construction records, clippings, deed of gift, and the land deed of the house. Dates covered are 1971-[ongoing]. These records concern the operation of the Sam Rayburn House as a historical house museum by the Historical Commission.

Sam Rayburn was a Texas Congressman, serving in the United States Congress for 48 years, 17 of those as Speaker of the House. He was a powerful figure in American government this century. In 1971 his house in Bonham, Texas, was deeded to the Texas Historical Commission. The agency began restoration work in 1972 and in 1975 it opened the house to the public as a historic house museum. It is the only historic house site operated by the agency. The Sam Rayburn House preserves actual furnishings, clothing, and other possessions of the Rayburn family. The site dates back to 1916 when Sam Rayburn purchased the land and had the house built.

Purpose:

These records are created to administer the Sam Rayburn House as a historical house museum, as well as documenting the history of the house.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The History Programs Division operates the National Register Program and the Local History Program. This division is compiling a statewide inventory of Texas properties significant in American history, architecture, or culture. It nominates the most significant properties to the National Register of Historic Places. It assists designated cities with developing ordinances and programs to preserve local landmarks and also provides other assistance to county officials, nonprofit heritage organizations, and individuals in preserving cultural and historic resources of the state. It operates the Texas Historical Marker program and administers the Sam Rayburn House Museum in Bonham, Texas.

Sam Rayburn was a Texas Congressman, serving in the United States Congress for 48 years, 17 of those as Speaker of the House. He was a powerful figure in American government this century. In 1971 his house in Bonham, Texas, was deeded to the Texas Historical Commission. The agency began restoration work in 1972 and in 1975 it opened the house to the public as a historic house museum. It is the only historic house site operated by the agency. The Sam Rayburn House preserves actual furnishings, clothing, and other possessions of the Rayburn family. The site dates back to 1916 when Sam Rayburn purchased the land and had the house built.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Topical

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

The Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin, houses the papers of Sam Rayburn at the Center in Austin, and operates the Sam Rayburn Library and Museum, located in Bonham, Texas.

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Sam Rayburn House
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 12
Archival code: R
Retention: LA

Archival holdings:

Sam Rayburn House files, c. 1975-1978, 0.47 cubic ft.
This is part of a larger series, Records, 1960-1981, 5.71 cubic ft., which consists of subject files received from the Commission. One large wallet pertains to the Sam Rayburn House, containing photographs, press releases, newsletters, brochures, articles about Sam Rayburn, publication drafts, and programs from the dedication of the house museum.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents the acquisition and history of the Sam Rayburn House and the programs involved in the house as a historic house museum. This is a significant historic property of the Historical Commission that should be thoroughly documented. Because this series contains informational value about the history of the facility and documents its maintenance as a historic house museum, this series has been appraised to be archival. Change the archival code to "A." As long as the agency maintains this facility as a historic house museum they need to maintain these records. If the house at some point is not operated as a museum but just kept as a historic property, the records can then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Photo/slide collection 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
History Programs Division (Local History Programs)

Contact: Egina Reyes
463-5853

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency permanently. Current holdings date from the about the 1970s-[ongoing], comprising about 4 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains color slides, black and white photographs, and black and white contact sheets and negatives. The agency is unsure of the dates since many are not dated, but believe they date from the 1970s-[ongoing], though some may be earlier. These are photographs/slides taken by Local History Programs staff of historic sites in counties, historical markers, buildings or sites receiving markers, and history-related events, such as Women’s History Month and Black History Month activities. Additional photographs and slides of county historic events can be found in the series County records. Additional photographs of historical markers and buildings or sites receiving markers can be found in the series Marker files. Both of these series are housed in the History Programs Division.

Purpose:

These photographic images are created and maintained to provide a visual record of historic resources and program activities.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The History Programs Division operates the National Register Program and the Local History Program. This division is compiling a statewide inventory of Texas properties significant in American history, architecture, or culture. It nominates the most significant properties to the National Register of Historic Places. It assists designated cities with developing ordinances and programs to preserve local landmarks and also provides other assistance to county officials, nonprofit heritage organizations, and individuals in preserving cultural and historic resources of the state. It operates the Texas Historical Marker program and administers the Sam Rayburn House Museum in Bonham, Texas.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: By image type, then by county.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? Yes, available at the agency.

Gaps: None known

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Photo/slide collection
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 15
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:

The Archives holds some early photographs of county historical projects that may be part of this series or perhaps more likely the series County files, also housed in the History Programs Division.

Photographs, county projects, c. 1930-1980s, 0.56 cubic ft.
These are photographs and slides from county historic photograph projects, dating from the 1930s through the 1980s. Unprocessed.

Appraisal decision:

These images provide visual documentation of historic resources and program activities. Documentation of these historic resources does have informational value as it provides part of the visual record of sites and structures available in the records of this agency. As with the other photograph/slides series that document historic resources, this series has been appraised to be archival. Add an archival code of "A" to the schedule and change the retention period to AV–administratively valuable. A note can be added to the Remarks section as follows: "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Marker files 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
History Programs Division (Local History Programs)

Contact: Egina Reyes
463-5853

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: 2 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency permanently. Current holdings date from 1936-[ongoing], comprising about 120 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains inscriptions, correspondence dealing with historical markers, narrative histories, clippings, and photographs and maps of historic sites. Dates covered are 1936-[ongoing]. The marker files contain well-documented local histories of designated properties. Photographs and slides of markers and buildings receiving markers can also be found in the series Photo/side collection, held in the History Programs Division. Rejected historical marker applications can be found in the series County files, housed in the History Programs Division. Records concerning architectural reviews of changes to structures designated as Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks can be found in the series Recorded Texas Historic Landmark Reviews and Texas Historic Landmarks — Plans/maps/drawings, held in the Division of Architecture. Historical marker inscriptions are also present on the agency’s online database of historic sites, the Texas Historic Sites Atlas.

The Texas Historic Sites Atlas is a large database which features information on more than 200,000 historic site records, providing state historical marker inscriptions, National Register of Historic Places entries and property photos, neighborhood survey records of historic properties, museum exhibits, sawmill records from 52 East Texas counties, and maps of sites featured in the database. Information from the state archeological landmarks files is due to be added shortly. The Atlas is currently available on the web site of the Texas Historical Commission and can be searched by county, site name, or address.

Purpose:

These records are created to provide documentation for sites receiving historical markers from the agency and are maintained to house the individual files for all the historical markers in the state.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The History Programs Division operates the National Register Program and the Local History Program. This division is compiling a statewide inventory of Texas properties significant in American history, architecture, or culture. It nominates the most significant properties to the National Register of Historic Places. It assists designated cities with developing ordinances and programs to preserve local landmarks and also provides other assistance to county officials, nonprofit heritage organizations, and individuals in preserving cultural and historic resources of the state. It operates the Texas Historical Marker program and administers the Sam Rayburn House Museum in Bonham, Texas.

The Official Texas Historical Marker program began in 1962, although markers were placed at historic sites in Texas beginning in 1936 when the Texas Centennial Commission placed more than 1,500 granite markers during the Texas Centennial in 1936. The subject markers programs and building medallion programs began in 1962 to document Texas’ significant historic events, persons, sites, and buildings. Whether a marker is granted or not is decided by the State Marker Review Board, a subcommittee of the Texas Historical Commission. If the board approves the application for a marker, the Historical Commission staff prepares a marker inscription with input from the applicant. Markers are paid for by the sponsor, group, or individual that submits the application. The Texas Department of Highways and Transportation then erects the marker.

Any marker which has received a medallion or both a medallion and a building marker are designated as Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks (RTHL). Some properties with subject markers have also been designated as RTHLs. Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks are properties that have been designated by the State Marker Review Board as particularly significant in the architectural history of the state. This is a permanent designation and cannot be transferred to another structure. The exterior appearance of RTHL buildings are to retain their historical integrity after designation. Any architectural or structural changes to be made to these buildings are to be reviewed by the Division of Architecture for compliance with the provisions of V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442, Section 442.006(f). If appreciable or unwarranted changes are observed to have been made to a landmark structure, the designation and marker may be withdrawn by the State Marker Review Board.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records:

Guide to Official Texas Historical Markers, Texas Historical Commission, several editions. Also, historical markers and Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks granted each biennium are listed in the biennial report of the agency.

Historical marker inscriptions are also present on the agency’s online database of historic sites, the Texas Historic Sites Atlas.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series, however some ledgers listed as historical marker ledgers were authorized for destruction in fiscal year 1994.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Marker files [paper]
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 18A
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Title: Marker files [microfilm]
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 18B
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

Guide to Official Texas Historical Markers, Texas Historical Commission, several editions.

Appraisal decision:

The historical marker program is a major function of the agency–it has been one of its longest running programs. These marker files contain historical documentation on all the buildings, sites, districts, etc. that have received a historical marker from the state of Texas. For some sites and facilities, this material may its best source of documentation. Because of the informational and research value of these files, the series of paper files have been appraised to be archival. Although the marker text for many of these has been published, additional materials in the files supplement the concise descriptions found on the markers. Add an archival code of "A" to the schedule and change the retention period to AV–administratively valuable. A note can be added to the Remarks section as follows: "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission." The microfilm files can remain PM without an archival code.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: County files 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
History Programs Division (Local History Programs)

Contact: Egina Reyes
463-5853

Obsolete record series? No, but the records contain an obsolete sub-series called the "old" county files, which were replaced by the "new" county files.
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: two cubic ft.

Agency holdings:

Retained permanently by the agency, according to the retention schedule. Present holdings of the agency are from the late 1960s-[ongoing]. "New" county files consist of approximately 19 cubic ft., the "old" county files consist of 23 cubic ft., for a total of 42 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains correspondence with and information about County Historical Commissions (CHC), and historical and cultural resources in the counties, including lists of CHC members, CHC projects, clippings, articles, and rejected historical marker applications. The "old" county files, which date from the late 1960s to the early 1970s, also contain Texas State Historical Survey Committee surveys, clippings, photographs, correspondence, and other administrative documents related to the agency’s county programs. The Texas Historical Survey, undertaken by the Texas State Historical Survey Committee, gathered information about historical markers and other historical and cultural resources in Texas by counties. Another series containing records from early surveys of historical resources in the state is the series Survey and inventory (files of historic resources), housed in the History Programs Division (National Register Program section).

Records of approved historical markers can be found in the series Marker files. Additional photographs and slides of historic sites in counties can be found in the series Photo/slide collection. Both of these series are housed in the History Programs Division (Local History Programs).

Purpose:

These records are created to communicate with County Historical Commissions and to maintain current information about their activities and resources. Some of the older records were created by surveys undertaken by the Texas State Historical Survey Committee of historic and cultural resources in Texas counties.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The History Programs Division operates the National Register Program and the Local History Program. This division is compiling a statewide inventory of Texas properties significant in American history, architecture, or culture. It nominates the most significant properties to the National Register of Historic Places. It assists designated cities with developing ordinances and programs to preserve local landmarks and also provides other assistance to county officials, nonprofit heritage organizations, and individuals in preserving cultural and historic resources of the state. It operates the Texas Historical Marker program and administers the Sam Rayburn House Museum in Bonham, Texas.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: No records exist prior to the late 1960s; the agency is not sure what other gaps may exist.

Problems:

The county files are divided into two subgroups–"old" and "new" county files. The "old" county files contain several filing sequences, which have also been mixed up due to less than ideal storage conditions and several moves within the agency.

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: County files
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 19
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:

The Archives does hold some early survey files of the Texas State Historical Committee that may be part of this series. Or they could belong to the series Survey and inventory (files of historic resources), housed in the History Programs Division (National Register Program section). They also hold some early photographs of county historical projects that may be part of this series or perhaps the series Photo/slide collection.

Records relating to activities of the Civil War Centennial, 1955, 1961-1968, 12.69 cubic ft.
This accession contains correspondence, minutes, printed materials, reports, and case files for Confederate memorial information markers.

Record of Graves of Civil War Veterans, undated, [size included in above accession]
This series contain military service information and biographical data on Civil War veterans identified in the survey.

Historical Survey Committee records, 1963-1964, 1.88 cubic ft.
This series contains records of graves of civil war veterans, records of historical markers, including photographs, correspondence, and files from a Civil War essay contest.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents the agency’s interaction with county historical commissions and county projects, and the early efforts of the Texas State Historical Survey Committee to gather data about historical and cultural resources in Texas counties. Because of the informational value to be found in this series which would provide further documentation of historical sites, structures, and other such resources throughout the state, this series has been appraised to be archival. Transfer the "old" county files to the Archives and Information Services Division as these will augment earlier county files and surveys we have already received. The "new" county files can remain at the agency as they are still used regularly. Add an archival code of "A" to the schedule and change the retention period to AV–administratively valuable. A note can be added to the Remarks section as follows: "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Save Outdoor Sculpture (SOS) records

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
History Programs Division (Local History Programs)

Contact: Egina Reyes
463-5853

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

The records are retained permanently by the agency according to the retention schedule. Current holdings are dated 1994-[ongoing], totaling 22 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains completed survey forms, ISTEA Conservation Project Grant files, internal reports on the conservation work done, the project coordinator’s files from the SOS! Survey project, and forthcoming publications. Dates covered are 1994-[ongoing]. The information in these files concern the agency’s Save Outdoor Sculpture (SOS!) Project and will soon be published in an report documenting the work done on the first ten sculpture conservation projects, due out in spring 1999.

Purpose:

These records are created and maintained to administer the Save Outdoor Sculpture (SOS) project.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The History Programs Division operates the National Register Program and the Local History Program. This division is compiling a statewide inventory of Texas properties significant in American history, architecture, or culture. It nominates the most significant properties to the National Register of Historic Places. It assists designated cities with developing ordinances and programs to preserve local landmarks and also provides other assistance to county officials, nonprofit heritage organizations, and individuals in preserving cultural and historic resources of the state. It operates the Texas Historical Marker program and administers the Sam Rayburn House Museum in Bonham, Texas. It recently undertook a new program designed to promote and provide conservation for outdoor sculpture, known as the save Outdoor Sculpture Project.

The Save Outdoor Sculpture Project (SOS!) was established by the Texas Historical Commission in 1993 as part of a national effort to locate and inventory publicly accessible outdoor sculpture and increase public awareness of the value and need for care and maintenance of these works. Using a combination of federal and local funds, the project calls for the cleaning, repair, conservation, and promotion of the sculptures. The federal agencies involved in funding the project are the National Museum of American Art, the Smithsonian Institution, and the National Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Property.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)

Arrangement: Typically by county, otherwise alphabetically

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None, records begin in 1994.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

Some records relating to the grant files may be present in the national agencies supporting the grant work, the National Museum of American Art, the Smithsonian Institution, and the National Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Property.

Publications based on records: None yet

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Save Outdoor Sculpture (SOS) records
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 20
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

None, but a copy of the report due out this spring should be sent to the State Publications Depository soon after publication.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents conservation work done on publicly accessible outdoor sculpture in the state. It does not contain a history of the structure, just the conservation work done. While documentation of these outdoor sculptures is important, the work done is to be published and the publication will summarize what was done to each of the sculptures worked on through these grant projects. The publication(s) will provide sufficient documentation of this activity. This series can remain as it is, without an archival code. However, a note needs to be added to the Remarks column of the schedule — "Publications resulting from the SOS! Project need to be deposited in the State Publications Depository."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: State Board of Review minutes and agenda

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
History Programs Division (National Register Program)

Contact: Judy George
463-8452

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency permanently, according to the retention schedule. Current holdings are c. 1968-[ongoing], totaling about one cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains minutes and agenda of the meetings of the State Board of Review, a board affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission. Dates covered are c. 1968-[ongoing]. The minutes report the decisions by the Board on nominations of sites to be added to the National Register of Historic Places. The later minutes, beginning about 1990, contain often lengthy summaries of the discussions by Board members regarding the status of the nominations. Other items discussed in the minutes include changes in bylaws, resolutions, guidelines for nominating sites, and election of officers.

Materials presented to the Board for use in evaluating the nominated sites can be found in the series, National Register project files and the series National Register Supplemental Documentation. Audio tapes of some meetings can be found in the series, State Board of Review meetings — audio and video tapes. Information from the entries listed on the National Register can be found in an online database maintained by the Historical Commission, known as The Texas Historic Sites Atlas. The Atlas is currently available on the web site of the Texas Historical Commission and can be searched by county, site name, or address.

Purpose:

The minutes document the discussions and decisions of the State Board of Review in their meetings.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The History Programs Division operates the National Register Program and the Local History Program. This division is compiling a statewide inventory of Texas properties significant in American history, architecture, or culture. It nominates the most significant properties to the National Register of Historic Places. It assists designated cities with developing ordinances and programs to preserve local landmarks and also provides other assistance to county officials, nonprofit heritage organizations, and individuals in preserving cultural and historic resources of the state. It operates the Texas Historical Marker program and administers the Sam Rayburn House Museum in Bonham, Texas.

The National Register of Historic Places was established in 1966 through passage of the National Historic Preservation Act. The register serves as a federal listing of buildings, sites, structures, districts, and objects that meet one or more of the criteria defined in 36 CFR Part 60.4. If a site is eligible, a form is completed and submitted for nomination. Once nominated, the form is reviewed by the National Register Department, then by the State Board of Review for formal consideration. If passed, it is submitted to the Keeper of the National Register for final approval and listing. The first listing of Texas properties in the register was in October 1969.

The State Board of Review, affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission, evaluates nominations of historic sites to the National Register of Historic Places. Members are professionals in the fields of architecture, history, archeology, and architectural history. Members are appointed to the Board by the Texas Historical Commission.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Chronological, by date of the meeting.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records:

A Catalog of Texas Properties in the National Register of Historic Places, compiled by James W. Steely. Published by the Texas Historical Commission, 1984.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: State Board of Review (minutes and agenda)
Series item number: 1.1.058
Agency item number: 6
Archival code: A
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:

State Board of Review, Minutes, 1983-1995, 0.24 cubic ft.
This series contains minutes of the meetings of the State Board of Review, dating from 1983-1995, with gaps for some months and years. We are missing any minutes prior to October 1983; minutes from 1984; January 1985; 1987; Oct. 1988; Feb. 1990; March 1991; July 1992; Feb. 1993; Sept. 1994; and any after Feb. 1995. Agenda and supporting documentation are not present.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

A Catalog of Texas Properties in the National Register of Historic Places, compiled by James W. Steely. Published by the Texas Historical Commission, 1984.

Appraisal decision:

One of the major functions of the Texas Historical Commission is to evaluate and preserve historic sites in Texas. One way this is carried out is through nominations of sites to the National Register of Historic Places. The State Board of Review has an important role in this process. They are the state board that ultimately approves or dismisses nominations. The minutes provide a concise summary of the actions of the board, including listings of all the nominations voted on. Because of the important function of this body, this series has been appraised to be archival. The archival code of "A" will remain on the schedule for this series.

We have minutes for some years already. The agency needs to transfer to us minutes (or copies of the minutes) for the following months/years. Any minutes prior to October 1983; minutes from 1984; January 1985; 1987; Oct. 1988; Feb. 1990; March 1991; July 1992; Feb. 1993; Sept. 1994; and any after Feb. 1995. We also need copies of all agendas transferred as well.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: State Board of Review meetings — audio and videotapes 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
History Programs Division (National Register Program)

Contact: Judy George
463-8452

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:


Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for 90 days after the approval of the meeting minutes, according to the retention schedule. The agency was unable to supplies dates for these tapes, though they likely are dated in the late 1980s-1990s, about 1 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains audio tapes of the meetings of the State Board of Review, a board affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission. The agency was unable to supplies dates for these tapes, though they likely are dated in the late 1980s-1990s. The meetings report the decisions by the Board on nominations of sites to be added to the National Register of Historic Places. The later meetings, beginning about 1990, often contain lengthy discussions by Board members regarding the status of the nominations. Other items discussed in the meetings include changes in bylaws, resolutions, guidelines for nominating sites, and election of officers.

Minutes and agenda of these board meetings can be found in the series, State Board of Review minutes and agenda. Materials presented to the Board for use in evaluating the nominated sites can be found in the series, National Register project files and the series National Register Supplemental Documentation.

Purpose:

These audio tapes provide oral documentation of the discussions and decisions of the State Board of Review in their meetings.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The History Programs Division operates the National Register Program and the Local History Program. This division is compiling a statewide inventory of Texas properties significant in American history, architecture, or culture. It nominates the most significant properties to the National Register of Historic Places. It assists designated cities with developing ordinances and programs to preserve local landmarks and also provides other assistance to county officials, nonprofit heritage organizations, and individuals in preserving cultural and historic resources of the state. It operates the Texas Historical Marker program and administers the Sam Rayburn House Museum in Bonham, Texas.

The National Register of Historic Places was established in 1966 through passage of the National Historic Preservation Act. The register serves as a federal listing of buildings, sites, structures, districts, and objects that meet one or more of the criteria defined in 36 CFR Part 60.4. If a site is eligible, a form is completed and submitted for nomination. Once nominated, the form is reviewed by the National Register Department, then by the State Board of Review for formal consideration. If passed, it is submitted to the Keeper of the National Register for final approval and listing. The first listing of Texas properties in the register was in October 1969.

The State Board of Review, affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission, evaluates nominations of historic sites to the National Register of Historic Places. Members are professionals in the fields of architecture, history, archeology, and architectural history. Members are appointed to the Board by the Texas Historical Commission.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Chronological, by date of the meeting.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: unknown

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Meetings — audio and videotapes
Series item number: 1.1.054
Agency item number: 8
Archival code: A
Retention: AC+90

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

One of the major functions of the Texas Historical Commission is to evaluate and preserve historic sites in Texas. One way this is carried out is through nominations of sites to the National Register of Historic Places. The State Board of Review has an important role in this process. They are the state board that ultimately approves or dismisses nominations. Although this is an important function, the audio tapes do not have long term value and items discussed on the tapes are summarized in the minutes. The minutes provide a concise summary of the actions of the board, including listings of all the nominations voted on. This is sufficient documentation of this process. The archival code of "A" code can be removed from the schedule.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Survey and inventory (files of historic resources) 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
History Programs Division (National Register Program)

Contact: Judy George
463-8452

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: several inches

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency permanently, according to the retention schedule. Current holdings are c. 1953-[ongoing], totaling 3 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains survey data gathered through various surveys of historic resources in Texas. Dates covered are c. 1953-[ongoing]. Types of materials present include survey cards, reports, slides, and negatives. These materials were used for research and identification of historic resources. The surveys have been conducted by the Historical Commission staff and outside sources, such as county historical commissions or similar groups, usually as a grant-funded project. Some of the earlier surveys were possibly conducted by the Texas State Historical Survey Committee as part of the Texas Historical Survey to gather information about historical and cultural resources in Texas counties. Another series containing records from early historical surveys is the series County files, housed in the History Programs Division (Local History Programs section).

Purpose:

These records are created by surveys undertaken by agency staff and other bodies to gather data about historic and cultural resources in Texas counties. The files are also used by agency staff and the general public to conduct research about historical resources.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The History Programs Division operates the National Register Program and the Local History Program. This division is compiling a statewide inventory of Texas properties significant in American history, architecture, or culture. It nominates the most significant properties to the National Register of Historic Places. It assists designated cities with developing ordinances and programs to preserve local landmarks and also provides other assistance to county officials, nonprofit heritage organizations, and individuals in preserving cultural and historic resources of the state. It operates the Texas Historical Marker program and administers the Sam Rayburn House Museum in Bonham, Texas.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: unknown

Publications based on records: None known

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Survey and inventory (files of historic resources)
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 10
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:

The Archives and Information Services Division does hold some early survey files of the Texas State Historical Committee that may be part of this series. Or they may be part of a different series, County files, which is housed in the History Programs Division (Local History Programs section).

Records relating to activities of the Civil War Centennial, 1955, 1961-1968, 12.69 cubic ft.
This accession contains correspondence, minutes, printed materials, reports, and case files for Confederate memorial information markers.

Record of Graves of Civil War Veterans, undated, [size included in above accession]
This series contain military service information and biographical data on Civil War veterans identified in the survey.

Historical Survey Committee records, 1963-1964, 1.88 cubic ft.
This series contains records of graves of civil war veterans, records of historical markers, including photographs, correspondence, and files from a Civil War essay contest.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents findings of the survey of historic resources in Texas, which has provided and continues to provide information about a variety of historic resources in the state. Information in these records is also used to supply needed documentation for grant funding and other projects involving these historic resources by agency staff, county historical commissions, and the general public. There is significant informational value to be found in these records and this series has been appraised to be archival. Add an archival code of "A" to the schedule and change the retention period to AV–administratively valuable. A note can be added to the Remarks section as follows: "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: County files [Preliminary National Register files] 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
History Programs Division (National Register Program)

Contact: Judy George
463-8452

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for 5 years, according to the retention schedule. Current holdings are 1968-[ongoing], comprising 1 cubic ft.

Description:

This series consists of correspondence with county officials and others re: preliminary inquiries regarding sites nominated for the National Register, dating 1968-[ongoing].

Purpose:

These records are communications from county officials and others about possible future national register nominations.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The History Programs Division operates the National Register Program and the Local History Program. This division is compiling a statewide inventory of Texas properties significant in American history, architecture, or culture. It nominates the most significant properties to the National Register of Historic Places. It assists designated cities with developing ordinances and programs to preserve local landmarks and also provides other assistance to county officials, nonprofit heritage organizations, and individuals in preserving cultural and historic resources of the state. It operates the Texas Historical Marker program and administers the Sam Rayburn House Museum in Bonham, Texas.

The National Register of Historic Places was established in 1966 through passage of the National Historic Preservation Act. The register serves as a federal listing of buildings, sites, structures, districts, and objects that meet one or more of the criteria defined in 36 CFR Part 60.4. If a site is eligible, a form is completed and submitted for nomination. Once nominated, the form is reviewed by the National Register Department, then by the State Board of Review for formal consideration. If passed, it is submitted to the Keeper of the National Register for final approval and listing. The first listing of Texas properties in the register was in October 1969.

The State Board of Review, affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission, evaluates nominations of historic sites to the National Register of Historic Places. Members are professionals in the fields of architecture, history, archeology, and architectural history. Members are appointed to the Board by the Texas Historical Commission.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: County files
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 11
Archival code: none
Retention: 5

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents correspondence with county officials and other wishing to nominate sites for placement on the National Register of Historical of Historic Places. While listing on the National Register is a significant acknowledgment of the historic importance of a site, this series just contains preliminary correspondence about possible sites. More complete documentation can be found in the series, National Register project files, National Register supplemental documentation, and State Board of Review minutes and agenda, which have been recommended for archival status. This series has been appraised to be non-archival. We suggest renaming it to make it more descriptive. No other changes need to be made to the retention schedule.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: National Register project files 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
History Programs Division (National Register Program)

Contact: Judy George
463-8452

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency permanently, according to the retention schedule. Current holdings are 1968-[ongoing], totaling 2 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains correspondence (primarily with county officials and property owners) and nomination forms for historic sites nominated for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. Dates covered are 1968-[ongoing]. This material is presented by agency staff to the State Board of Review during their meetings as supporting documentation for the nominated sites.

Minutes and agenda of the meetings of the State Board of Review, during which nominations were discussed and voted on, can be found in the series State Board of Review minutes and agenda. Audio tapes of some meetings can be found in the series State Board of Review meetings — audio and video tapes. Additional supporting documentation for the nominated sites can be found in the series National Register Supplemental Documentation. Information from the entries listed on the National Register can be found in an online database maintained by the Historical Commission, known as The Texas Historic Sites Atlas. The Atlas is currently available on the web site of the Texas Historical Commission and can be searched by county, site name, or address.

Purpose:

These records are in nominating sites for the National Register of Historic Places. They are further maintained as research materials for these historic resources for use by the staff and general public.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The History Programs Division operates the National Register Program and the Local History Program. This division is compiling a statewide inventory of Texas properties significant in American history, architecture, or culture. It nominates the most significant properties to the National Register of Historic Places. It assists designated cities with developing ordinances and programs to preserve local landmarks and also provides other assistance to county officials, nonprofit heritage organizations, and individuals in preserving cultural and historic resources of the state. It operates the Texas Historical Marker program and administers the Sam Rayburn House Museum in Bonham, Texas.

The National Register of Historic Places was established in 1966 through passage of the National Historic Preservation Act. The register serves as a federal listing of buildings, sites, structures, districts, and objects that meet one or more of the criteria defined in 36 CFR Part 60.4. If a site is eligible, a form is completed and submitted for nomination. Once nominated, the form is reviewed by the National Register Department, then by the State Board of Review for formal consideration. If passed, it is submitted to the Keeper of the National Register for final approval and listing. The first listing of Texas properties in the register was in October 1969.

The State Board of Review, affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission, evaluates nominations of historic sites to the National Register of Historic Places. Members are professionals in the fields of architecture, history, archeology, and architectural history. Members are appointed to the Board by the Texas Historical Commission.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

Possible related records in the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, National Register Department.

Publications based on records:

A Catalog of Texas Properties in the National Register of Historic Places, compiled by James W. Steely. Published by the Texas Historical Commission, 1984.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: National Register Project files
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 14
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

A Catalog of Texas Properties in the National Register of Historic Places, compiled by James W. Steely. Published by the Texas Historical Commission, 1984.

Appraisal decision:

This series contains the nomination forms and related correspondence sent in by county officials, property owners, and others concerning the nomination of a site to the National Register of Historic Places. The nomination forms, once approved, are sent to the Keeper of the National Register, at the National Park Service in Washington. While listing on the National Register is a significant acknowledgment of the historic importance of a site, this series contains only the nomination forms and associated correspondence about nominated sites. More complete documentation about a site can be found in the series, National Register supplemental documentation, and discussions about the sites can be found in the series State Board of Review minutes and agenda, both of which have been recommended for archival status. This series has been appraised to be non-archival. No changes need to be made to the retention schedule.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Historic resources slide files 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
History Programs Division (National Register Program)

Contact: Judy George
463-8452

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency permanently, according to the retention schedule. Current holdings are c. 1968-[ongoing], comprising 1 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains photographic slides of historic sites and facilities that have been nominated for inclusion into the National Register of Historic Places, dating about 1968-[ongoing].

Purpose:

These slides are created and maintained to serve as visual resource of historic sites and facilities nominated for National Register status.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The History Programs Division operates the National Register Program and the Local History Program. This division is compiling a statewide inventory of Texas properties significant in American history, architecture, or culture. It nominates the most significant properties to the National Register of Historic Places. It assists designated cities with developing ordinances and programs to preserve local landmarks and also provides other assistance to county officials, nonprofit heritage organizations, and individuals in preserving cultural and historic resources of the state. It operates the Texas Historical Marker program and administers the Sam Rayburn House Museum in Bonham, Texas.

The National Register of Historic Places was established in 1966 through passage of the National Historic Preservation Act. The register serves as a federal listing of buildings, sites, structures, districts, and objects that meet one or more of the criteria defined in 36 CFR Part 60.4. If a site is eligible, a form is completed and submitted for nomination. Once nominated, the form is reviewed by the National Register Department, then by the State Board of Review for formal consideration. If passed, it is submitted to the Keeper of the National Register for final approval and listing. The first listing of Texas properties in the register was in October 1969.

The State Board of Review, affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission, evaluates nominations of historic sites to the National Register of Historic Places. Members are professionals in the fields of architecture, history, archeology, and architectural history. Members are appointed to the Board by the Texas Historical Commission.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: none

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None known

Publications based on records: None known

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Historic Resources Slide Files
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 15
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:

No records on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission have been specifically identified to be part of this series.

Appraisal decision:

This series provides visual documentation of historic sites nominated for the National Register. Listing on the National Register is a significant acknowledgment of the historic importance of a site and visual documentation of the sites as they existed at the point of nomination can have added importance since historic structures may have renovation work done at some point. Because of the importance of visually documenting these resources, this series has been appraised to be archival. Add an archival code of "A" to the schedule and change the retention period to AV–administratively valuable. A note can be added to the Remarks section as follows: "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Historic resources maps and drawings files 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
History Programs Division (National Register Program)

Contact: Judy George
463-8452

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: several inches

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency permanently, according to the retention schedule. Current holdings are c. 1968-[ongoing], comprising 2 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains drawings of various historic sites and facilities and maps of the areas where these historic resources are located, dating c. 1968-[ongoing]. The maps are generally United States Geologic Survey maps or state of Texas highway maps; the drawings are generally HABS drawings–done as part of the Historic American Buildings Survey.

Purpose:

These records are gathered and maintained to provide the location of historic resources and drawings of historic sites and facilities.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The History Programs Division operates the National Register Program and the Local History Program. This division is compiling a statewide inventory of Texas properties significant in American history, architecture, or culture. It nominates the most significant properties to the National Register of Historic Places. It assists designated cities with developing ordinances and programs to preserve local landmarks and also provides other assistance to county officials, nonprofit heritage organizations, and individuals in preserving cultural and historic resources of the state. It operates the Texas Historical Marker program and administers the Sam Rayburn House Museum in Bonham, Texas.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

Maps are also available in the state or federal agency that produced the maps, such as the United States Geological Survey or the Texas Department of Highways and Transportation.

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Historic Resources Maps and Drawings files
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 16
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.  

Appraisal decision:

This series contains maps that provide the location of historic sites and facilities, and plans and drawings of some structures. While listing on the National Register is a significant acknowledgment of the historic importance of a site, this series contains government issue maps showing the location of facilities and sites, or HABS drawings of structures, which were not done by the Historical Commission. Because this series does not contain any unique materials for these sites, or materials that were prepared by the agency, this series has been appraised to be non-archival. No changes need to be made to the retention schedule. More complete documentation about a site can be found in the series, National Register supplemental documentation, and discussions about the sites can be found in the series State Board of Review minutes and agenda, both of which have been recommended for archival status.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: National Register supplemental documentation 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
History Programs Division (National Register Program)

Contact: Judy George
463-8452

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: several inches

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for 50 years according to the retention schedule. Current holdings are 1968-[ongoing], comprising about 2 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains clippings, photographs, maps, research notes, and correspondence (primarily with county officials and property owners) used as documentation for sites nominated for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. Dates covered are 1968-[ongoing]. This material is presented by agency staff to the State Board of Review during their meetings as supporting documentation for the nominated sites.

Minutes and agenda of the meetings of the State Board of Review, during which nominations were discussed and voted on, can be found in the series State Board of Review minutes and agenda. Audio tapes of some meetings can be found in the series State Board of Review meetings — audio and video tapes. The nomination forms and additional correspondence concerning the nominated sites can be found in the series National Register project files. Information from the entries listed on the National Register can be found in an online database maintained by the Historical Commission, known as The Texas Historic Sites Atlas. The Atlas is currently available on the web site of the Texas Historical Commission and can be searched by county, site name, or address.

Purpose:

These records are supporting documentation provide to the State Board of Review for their consideration of National Register nominations. They are then maintained as research files for staff and public use.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The History Programs Division operates the National Register Program and the Local History Program. This division is compiling a statewide inventory of Texas properties significant in American history, architecture, or culture. It nominates the most significant properties to the National Register of Historic Places. It assists designated cities with developing ordinances and programs to preserve local landmarks and also provides other assistance to county officials, nonprofit heritage organizations, and individuals in preserving cultural and historic resources of the state. It operates the Texas Historical Marker program and administers the Sam Rayburn House Museum in Bonham, Texas.

The National Register of Historic Places was established in 1966 through passage of the National Historic Preservation Act. The register serves as a federal listing of buildings, sites, structures, districts, and objects that meet one or more of the criteria defined in 36 CFR Part 60.4. If a site is eligible, a form is completed and submitted for nomination. Once nominated, the form is reviewed by the National Register Department, then by the State Board of Review for formal consideration. If passed, it is submitted to the Keeper of the National Register for final approval and listing. The first listing of Texas properties in the register was in October 1969.

The State Board of Review, affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission, evaluates nominations of historic sites to the National Register of Historic Places. Members are professionals in the fields of architecture, history, archeology, and architectural history. Members are appointed to the Board by the Texas Historical Commission.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by county

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: National Register Supplemental Documentation
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 17
Archival code: none
Retention: 50

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

This series serves to provide supporting documentation for the State Board of Review to use in their deliberations as whether to recommend the addition of a site or structure to the National Register of Historic Places. These records provide additional information about a site than is present on the nomination form and can make the difference in providing the board sufficient data to recommend nomination. Because of the informational value in these records, and the fact these files are actually meeting supporting documentation for a state board, this series has been appraised to be archival. Add an archival code of "A" to the schedule, change the series item number to 1.1.062, and change the retention to 2. A note can be added to the Remarks section as follows: "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Meeting agenda and minutes 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Community Heritage Development Division (Main Street Programs)

Contact: Janie Headrick
463-5758

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency permanently. Current holdings of the agency are 1981-[ongoing], 2 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains minutes, agenda, and supporting documentation for the meetings of a subcommittee of the Historical Commission–the Community Heritage Development Committee; and for the meetings of the Main Street Interagency Council; dating 1981-[ongoing].

Purpose:

The minutes document decisions made by the Community Heritage Development Committee and the Main Street Interagency Council.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Community Heritage Division operates the Main Street Program, the Heritage Tourism Program, and the Certified Local Government Program. The Main Street Program was created about 1981 and is designed to revitalize downtown centers of cities with fewer than 50,000 people. The program provides cities with architectural consultation, marketing, and interior design training for this purpose. In 1989 the Legislature provided funding for an Urban Main Street Program. The Heritage Tourism Program works with business communities and with civic and educational organizations to promote and preserve historic sites in heritage areas. The Certified Local Government Program was created in 1980 and offers technical assistance to cities and awards grants to help with the development of quality local preservation programs.

An Interagency Council reviews main street applications from cities and recommends to the Commission which cities to add to the Main Street Program. This Council is composed of two representatives from the Legislative Budget Board, one from the Governor’s Office of Budget and Planning, two from the Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs, and two from the Texas Department of Economic Development. Additionally, a subcommittee of the Historical Commission, the Community Heritage Development Committee, serves as an oversight committee for the division, by reviewing main street applications, rule changes, funding, and changes to the certified local government program.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended, 16 U.S.C. 470
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Meeting minutes — "open"
Series item number: 1.1.058
Agency item number: 4
Archival code: A
Retention: PM

Suggested series from the state records retention schedule:

Title: Meeting supporting documentation
Series item number: 1.1.062
Agency item number: not assigned
Archival code: A
Retention: 2

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

Meeting minutes of agency boards and commissions provide the highest level documentation of the actions of the agencies they govern. These are already considered to be archival. The actions of the Commission subcommittee are covered in summary form in the minutes of the Historical Commission. The actions of the Interagency Council are not, these do need documentation. This series has been appraised to be archival. The archival code and retention periods require no changes on the retention schedule. The agency needs to send copies of the meeting files of past meetings of the Interagency Council to the Archives and Information Services Division at their earliest convenience. Copies of future meeting files need to be sent on a regular basis, either at the end of the fiscal year or shortly after each meeting. I recommend changing the name to the Meeting agenda and minutes of the Main Street Interagency Council. The agency needs to add the series Meeting supporting documentation of the Main Street Interagency Council to the schedule since the retention period these two series are different. The meeting documentation for the years 1981-1995 needs to be transferred to the Archives, future transfers shall be when its retention period has been met.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Building construction — Project files (Christianson-Leberman complex) 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Community Heritage Development Division (Main Street Programs)

Contact: Janie Headrick
463-5758

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for ten years after the completion of projects according to the retention schedule. Current holdings of the agency are 1992-[ongoing], 2 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains narrative history, building plans, drawings, and photographs of the Christianson-Leberman building, documenting the origins and ownership of the building and subsequent restoration and rehabilitation activities undertaken; and contracts with architects and contractors. Dates covered are 1992-[ongoing]. This building was built in 1871. It is owned by the Historical Commission, currently housing staff of the Community Heritage Development Division. Plans and specifications for some renovation projects involving this building are also present in another series, see Agency building plans and specifications, housed in the Division of Architecture.

Purpose:

These records administer the Christianson-Leberman building and to record any changes made to the building.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Community Heritage Division operates the Main Street Program, the Heritage Tourism Program, and the Certified Local Government Program. The Main Street Program was created about 1981 and is designed to revitalize downtown centers of cities with fewer than 50,000 people. The program provides cities with architectural consultation, marketing, and interior design training for this purpose. In 1989 the Legislature provided funding for an Urban Main Street Program. The Heritage Tourism Program works with business communities and with civic and educational organizations to promote and preserve historic sites in heritage areas. The Certified Local Government Program was created in 1980 and offers technical assistance to cities and awards grants to help with the development of quality local preservation programs.

An Interagency Council reviews main street applications from cities and recommends to the Commission which cities to add to the Main Street Program. This Council is composed of two representatives from the Legislative Budget Board, one from the Governor’s Office of Budget and Planning, two from the Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs, and two from the Texas Department of Economic Development. Additionally, a subcommittee of the Historical Commission, the Community Heritage Development Committee, serves as an oversight committee for the division, by reviewing main street applications, rule changes, funding, and changes to the certified local government program.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended, 16 U.S.C. 470
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)

Arrangement: Alphabetical

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None known.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Building construction — Project files (Christianson-Leberman complex)
Series item number: 5.2.002
Agency item number: 9
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+10

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents changes made to a historic building owned and utilized as offices by the Historical Commission. This series contains the original building plans, a history of the building, and materials concerning changes made to the structure. Because this is an historic structure owned by the state, these materials need to be retained. This series has been appraised to be archival. Change the archival code to A and the retention period to LA, life of asset. The materials can remain at the agency as long as the agency uses the building. If the agency ceases use of this building in the future and it remains state property, these materials should be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Main Street city files (active/inactive applications) 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Community Heritage Development Division (Main Street Programs)

Contact: Janie Headrick
463-5758

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: about 10 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for twenty years after their purpose has been served, according to the retention schedule. Current holdings of the agency are 1981-[ongoing], 70 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains applications for Main Street designations, correspondence, contracts, newsletters, flyers and other promotional materials, materials relating to the progress of local programs, and statistical information about the programs. Dates covered are 1981-[ongoing]. Photographs, slides, building plans, and drawings are also present, but maintained separately. These latter items currently are not listed on the retention schedule.

Purpose:

These records are created and maintained to administer the Main Street program. It also documents efforts of cities to become involved with the program.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Community Heritage Division operates the Main Street Program, the Heritage Tourism Program, and the Certified Local Government Program. The Main Street Program was created about 1981 and is designed to revitalize downtown centers of cities with fewer than 50,000 people. The program provides cities with architectural consultation, marketing, and interior design training for this purpose. In 1989 the Legislature provided funding for an Urban Main Street Program. The Heritage Tourism Program works with business communities and with civic and educational organizations to promote and preserve historic sites in heritage areas. The Certified Local Government Program was created in 1980 and offers technical assistance to cities and awards grants to help with the development of quality local preservation programs.

An Interagency Council reviews main street applications from cities and recommends to the Commission which cities to add to the Main Street Program. This Council is composed of two representatives from the Legislative Budget Board, one from the Governor’s Office of Budget and Planning, two from the Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs, and two from the Texas Department of Economic Development. Additionally, a subcommittee of the Historical Commission, the Community Heritage Development Committee, serves as an oversight committee for the division, by reviewing main street applications, rule changes, funding, and changes to the certified local government program.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended, 16 U.S.C. 470
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)

Arrangement: By city, then year, then alphabetical

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records:

Cities awarded Main Street status are listed in the biennial report of the Historical Commission.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Main Street city files (active/inactive applications)
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 11
Archival code: R
Retention: PS+20

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents the efforts of cities to become part of the Main Street program and cities that were accepted in the program. For those cities involved in the program, there is some informational value on historic structures and business districts and the local programs involved. For some cities and towns, this may be significant information not available elsewhere, for others, many structures may already have historic designations and be thoroughly documented. Because we cannot review the files for each city and town to determine which historic areas have already been documented and which have not, we need to maintain these materials to obtain this information. This series has been appraised to be archival. Change the archival code to "A" and the retention period to AV–administratively valuable. A note can be added to the Remarks section as follows: "These records will remain at the agency until they cease to have frequent administrative and research use. They will then be transferred to the Library and Archives Commission."

The photographs and drawings can be maintained as part of this series or else placed in another series, as has been the pattern for similar Historical Commission records. If a new series is created it will be listed as archival on the schedule with the retention of AV, and a note in the Remarks column as listed above.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Correspondence - Administrative 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Marketing Communications Division

Contact: Marty Moulthrop
463-6255

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for three years according to the retention schedule. Current holdings are 1993-[ongoing], 0.5 cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains correspondence of the Publications staff with writers, other staff, the general public, and others. Dates covered are 1993-[ongoing]. These files concern publication activities of the department, including the Medallion newsletter, the Fehrenbach book award, and other publication activities.

Purpose:

This correspondence of the Publications staff provides some documentation of their activities.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The Texas Historical Commission is composed of eighteen members appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the Senate, serving overlapping six-year terms. The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

Affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission until it was abolished in 1995 was the Texas Antiquities Committee, created by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session (1969). This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None present at the agency prior to 1993.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Correspondence - Administrative
Series item number: 1.1.007
Agency item number: 2
Archival code: R
Retention: 3

Archival holdings:

Correspondence, 1975-1981, 0.24 cubic ft.
This part of a larger accession, listed as Records, 1960-1981, 5.71 cubic ft., consisting of subject files received from the Publications Division. A small section of correspondence is present for 1975-1981, which discusses various publications of the Commission, primarily projects for publication in the Medallion, the monthly newsletter of the Commission. Other publication correspondence is present in the subject files as well as copies of news releases, drafts, clippings, and other publications related materials.

Appraisal decision:

This series contains correspondence about publications produced by the Commission and a book award they issue. This is fairly routine correspondence and does not provide significant documentation of the agency or program functions, rather just the publication activities of this division. This series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the "R" code with the archival code of "E." A note needs to be added to the Remarks column for these series — "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, February 5, 1999."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: News or press releases

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Marketing Communications Division

Contact: Marty Moulthrop
463-6255

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for two years, according to the retention schedule. Current holdings are 1993-[ongoing], fractional cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains press releases issued by the agency which discuss various programs and activities of the agency, such as archeological discoveries and excavations, preservation activities, appointments to the commission, grants, historical marker dedications, upcoming workshops and seminars, and preservation and other awards presented by the commission. Dates covered are 1964-1979, 1993-[ongoing].

Purpose:

These releases provide publicity of the programs and activities of the Historical Commission.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The Texas Historical Commission is composed of eighteen members appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the Senate, serving overlapping six-year terms. The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

Affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission until it was abolished in 1995 was the Texas Antiquities Committee, created by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session (1969). This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None present for 1953-1963, 1980-1992.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: News or press releases (Preservation Week)
Series item number: 1.1.019
Agency item number: 5
Archival code: R
Retention: 2

Archival holdings:

News releases, 1964-1979, 0.75 cubic ft.
This part of a larger accession, listed as Records, 1960-1981, 5.71 cubic ft., consisting of subject files received from the Publications Division. The series contains news releases and an index to releases issues each year for most of the years covered. Topics include fundraising, grants, historical marker dedications, sites nominated for listing on the National Register, award announcements, archeological discoveries and excavations, exhibits, preservation programs, and appointment of commission members.

Appraisal decision:

This series contains news releases of the Historical Commission. The announcements cover a variety of activities undertaken by the commission and its divisions, providing a good source of information on some of the programs and projects of the commission. Because of the informational value in these releases about program activities, this series has been appraised to be archival. Change the archival code of "R" to "A" on the retention schedule. The agency can transfer the news releases that have fulfilled their retention period to the Library and Archives Commission now, and make yearly transfers thereafter.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Publication development files 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Marketing Communications Division

Contact: Marty Moulthrop
463-6255

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency for 2 years according to the retention schedule, agency staff state they maintain the records for 5 years. Current holdings are c. 1990-[ongoing], less than one cubic ft.

Description:

This series contains background research materials, drafts of articles, artworks, and photographs, dating c. 1990-[ongoing]. Most of the files concern basic agency works such as the biennial report and the strategic plans. Files are also present for two subject-oriented publications, Oral History for Texans and Shadows on the Land, and the newsletter of the Commission, the Medallion. Publication development files for some of the archeological reports published are present in the series Publication development files (housed in the Archeology Division).

Purpose:

These records are used to produce publications about various agency activities.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The Texas Historical Commission is composed of eighteen members appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the Senate, serving overlapping six-year terms. The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

Affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission until it was abolished in 1995 was the Texas Antiquities Committee, created by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session (1969). This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None present prior to 1990.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records:

Oral History for Texans, Shadows on the Land, the Medallion, and the strategic plans and biennial reports of the agency.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Publication development files
Series item number: 1.1.028
Agency item number: 6
Archival code: R
Retention: 2

Archival holdings:

Records, 1960-1981, 5.71 cubic ft.
This accession consists of subject files from the Publications Division. A small section of correspondence is present for 1975-1981, which discusses various publications of the Commission, primarily projects for publication in the Medallion, the monthly newsletter of the Commission. Other publication-related correspondence is present in the subject files as well as copies of news releases, drafts, notes, photographs, articles, brochures, maps, and clippings.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

The Publications Depository has copies of the strategic plans, the biennial reports, Oral History for Texans, Shadows on the Land, and The Medallion, from 1971-[ongoing]–volumes 8 through 10 are incomplete.

Appraisal decision:

This series contains materials currently used in producing routine agency publications, such as the biennial report; the newsletter of the agency, the Medallion; and two published reports, of which we have copies. We received publication development files from the Publications Division several years ago which contain drafts, notes, artwork, photographs, and other materials used in the development of a number of publications of the commission. Although there is a small amount of material present in the current series, the drafts, artwork, and photographs are original materials, which document several publications of the agency, in addition to the routine biennial reports, etc. As publication projects arise, more materials of potential archival value will be deposited here. Because of the informational value in what we have already received, what now exists besides the routine agency reports, and what may be documented in future uses of this series, this series has been appraised to be archival. Change the archival code to "A." The agency should transfer the files that have fulfilled their retention period to the Library and Archives Commission.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Reports — Annual and biennial agency (non-fiscal)

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Marketing Communications Division

Contact: Marty Moulthrop
463-6255

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency permanently according to the retention schedule. The present holdings of the agency are c. 1975-ongoing, comprising about 0.5 cubic feet.

Description:

These are biennial reports prepared by the Commission that summarize the activities of the agency for the biennium. Dates covered are 1955, 1957-1958, 1960, 1973-[ongoing]. The report describes the functions of the Commission and activities undertaken during a biennial period, including highlights of preservation activities; highlights of significant archeological discoveries (such as discovery of the LaBelle or the site of Fort Saint Louis); news of new projects (such as the implementation of the Texas Historic Sites Atlas online database or the military programs project); summaries of program and division activities; grants awarded; summaries of activities of associated boards and advisory committees and members of these bodies; listing of properties receiving historic designations (beginning in 1977), such as those designated as State Archeological Landmarks or Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks, those receiving historical markers, and those added to the National Register of Historic Places; and public outreach projects. The reports also contain an organization chart of the agency and a list of Commission members. Detailed information regarding the appropriations and expenditures of the agency can be found in the Annual Financial Report of the Commission.

Purpose:

Biennial reports are created to provide summary documentation of the activities of the agency over a biennial period.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The Texas Historical Commission is composed of eighteen members appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the Senate, serving overlapping six-year terms. Members must be citizens of Texas who have demonstrated an interest in the preservation of the state's historical heritage, and represent all geographical areas of Texas. Beginning in 1995, the membership must include a professional archeologist, a professional historian, and a licensed architect; and two of the members must be from counties with populations of less than 50,000. The governor names the chairperson. The members appoint an executive director to administer the agency. In 1998 the commission had a staff of about 100 employees.

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

The Texas Historical Commission has gone through a recent agency restructuring in which several divisions were combined. The agency now contains seven divisions, which carry out the following responsibilities of the agency.

 

  • The Administration Division oversees budgetary, planning, and other executive functions.
  • Staff Services handles personnel, accounting, and other staff functions.
  • The Archeology Division (formerly the Division of Antiquities Protection, and the Office of the State Archeologist) administers the archeological programs of the agency in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the Antiquities Code of Texas (V.T.C.A., Natural Resource Code, Title 9, Chapter 191). It nominates archeological sites for the National Register of Historic Places; issues permits for activities that impact archeological sites; designates sites as State Archeological Landmarks; conducts surveys for a statewide inventory of archeological sites; and administers the state marine archeology program. The Archeology Division also produces and distributes public outreach materials pertaining to Texas archeology, coordinates Texas Archeology Awareness month observances, and works with amateur archeologists who assist in preserving sites and collections. The Texas Antiquities Advisory Board assists the division with its state archeological landmark designations and issues pertaining to the Antiquities Code of Texas.
  • The Division of Architecture administers architectural grants through the Texas Preservation Trust Fund Grant Program, monitors the state’s National Historic Landmarks and reviews proposed changes to Recorded Texas Historic Landmarks. It also monitors and provides technical consultation on the restoration and adaptive reuse of the state’s architectural resources.
  • The History Programs Division operates the National Register Program and the Local History Program. This division is compiling a statewide inventory of Texas properties significant in American history, architecture, or culture. It nominates the most significant properties to the National Register of Historic Places. It assists designated cities with developing ordinances and programs to preserve local landmarks and also provides other assistance to county officials, nonprofit heritage organizations, and individuals in preserving cultural and historic resources of the state. It operates the Texas Historical Marker program and administers the Sam Rayburn House Museum in Bonham, Texas.
  • The Community Heritage Division operates the Main Street Program, the Heritage Tourism Program, and the Certified Local Government Program. The Main Street Program was created about 1981 and is designed to revitalize downtown centers of cities with fewer than 50,000 people. The program provides cities with architectural consultation, marketing, and interior design training for this purpose. In 1989 the Legislature provided funding for an Urban Main Street Program. The Heritage Tourism Program works with business communities and with civic and educational organizations to promote and preserve historic sites in heritage areas. The Certified Local Government Program was created in 1980 and offers technical assistance to cities and awards grants to help with the development of quality local preservation programs.
  • The Marketing Communications Division, which now includes the former Publications Division, issues a bimonthly newsletter, The Medallion, and provides production services for other departments, including the production of educational and technical materials concerning archeology, architecture, museum laws, and other topics. It also helps coordinate the agency’s annual museum conference and assists with public outreach.

There are several boards associated with the Texas Historical Commission. The State Board of Review evaluates nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. The Antiquities Advisory Board evaluates nominations for State Archeological Landmark status and considers issues associated with the Antiquities Code of Texas. The Guardians of Texas Preservation Trust Fund cultivates and develops sources for the support for the trust fund and advises the commission of potential donors of property or other assets. The Advisory Board of the Texas Preservation Trust Fund makes recommendations on Trust Fund grant allocations and advises on matters relating to more efficient utilization or enhancement of the fund. The Main Street Interagency Council evaluates applications for the Main Street programs.

Affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission until it was abolished in 1995 was the Texas Antiquities Committee, created by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session (1969). This was a nine-member commission with six ex-officio members, including the chairperson of the Texas Historical Commission or his/her designee, the State Archaeologist (whose office was transferred in 1969 from the State Building Commission to the Texas State Historical Survey Committee), the Director of the Parks and Wildlife Department, the Commissioner of the General Land Office, the State Engineer, and the Executive Director of the Texas Department of Water Resources. The three other members were appointed by the Governor with concurrence of the Senate, for two-year terms. These appointed members consisted of a professional historian, a professional archaeologist, and a professional museum director. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

Also affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission between 1971 and 1983 was the Texas Historical Resources Development Council. The Council promoted communication among its member agencies in their coordinated efforts to develop and publicize the historical resources of Texas.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None present for the years 1959, 1961-1972.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule:

Title: Reports — Annual and biennial agency (non-fiscal)
Series item number: 1.1.032
Agency item number: 13
Archival code: A
Retention: AC+6

Archival holdings:

The Archives and Information Services Division has reports for the years 1955, 1957, 1958, and 1960.

Texas Depository Collection holdings:

Archival requirement for this series is fulfilled by sending copies to the Publication Depository Program. Fifty-five copies of annual or biennial reports (includes narrative description) must be sent to the Publications Depository (13 Texas Administrative Code, Section 3.4 (1) (A)). The Publications Depository holds 1973/74-[ongoing].

Appraisal decision:

These reports summarize the activities of the Commission over a biennial period and are already considered archival. Their archival mandate is fulfilled by the agency sending copies of the reports to the Publications Depository. A note needs to be added to the Remarks column — "Copies sent to the Publications Depository Program fulfill the archival mandate."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Strategic plans 

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Marketing Communications Division

Contact: Marty Moulthrop
463-6255

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by:

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:

Retained by the agency. This series is not on the schedule, so an agency retention period has yet to be determined. The agency has copies of all three plans prepared–1995-1999, 1997-2001, and 1999-2003, fractional.

Description:

Strategic plans are long-range planning tools prepared by the agency in which the goals and objectives of the agency are presented along with performance measures for each. Plans contain a mission statement, a statement of philosophy, and external/internal assessment of the agency, and the goals of the agency. Each goal contains objectives, strategies, and output measures for measuring and achieving the goals. Also present is an organization chart of the agency. The Historical Commission has prepared three plans, in 1994, 1996, 1998 with the planning time frames 1995-1999, 1997-2001, and 1999-2003 respectively.

Purpose:

Strategic plans are long-range planning tools prepared by the agency to set forth goals and objectives of the agency over a multi-year period.

Agency program:

The Texas State Historical Survey Committee was created on a temporary basis in 1953 (Senate Concurrent Resolution 44, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session) to administer a comprehensive state program for historical preservation; it was given more permanent status in 1957 (Senate Bill 426, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The Committee became the Texas Historical Commission in 1973 (House Bill 1512, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).

The Texas Historical Commission is composed of eighteen members appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the Senate, serving overlapping six-year terms. Members must be citizens of Texas who have demonstrated an interest in the preservation of the state's historical heritage, and represent all geographical areas of Texas. Beginning in 1995, the membership must include a professional archeologist, a professional historian, and a licensed architect; and two of the members must be from counties with populations of less than 50,000. The governor names the chairperson. The members appoint an executive director to administer the agency. In 1998 the commission had a staff of about 100 employees.

The mission of the commission is to protect and preserve the state’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, economic benefit, and enjoyment of present and future generations. The main functions of the agency are to identify, preserve, interpret, and maintain historic and archeological sites. Duties of the agency include preservation consultation with the public; providing leadership to heritage organizations and county historical commissions; working with communities to protect Texas’ architectural heritage, including operation of the Texas Main Street Program; administering the state’s historical marker program; working with property owners to save archeological sites on private land; ensuring archeological sites are protected as land is developed for public construction projects; consulting with citizens and groups to nominate properties for historical and archeological landmark status and for the National Register of Historic Places; and making historical attractions a cornerstone of the Texas travel industry. The Commission also maintains the Historic Sites Atlas–a database of information on 200,000 historic sites in Texas; is involved with the LaSalle shipwreck project; and will play a key role in the development of the new state history museum being built in Austin.

V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 442
V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule: Not on schedule

Suggested series from state records retention schedule:

Title: Strategic plans
Series item number: 1.1.055
Agency item number: to be assigned
Archival code: A
Retention: AC+6

Archival holdings:

None in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:

The archival requirement for this series is fulfilled by sending 55 copies to the Publications Depository Programs, Library and Archives Commission (12 Texas Administrative Code, Section 3.4(1) (C)). The Publications Depository holds the plans for 1994, 1996, and 1998.

Appraisal decision:

The strategic plans document the long-range planning activities of the Commission and are already considered archival. Their archival mandate is fulfilled by the agency sending copies of the reports to the Publications Clearinghouse. This series needs to be added to the records retention schedule, with an archival code of "A" and a retention period of AC+6. Also, a note should be put in the Remarks column, "Copies sent to the Publications Depository Program fulfill the archival mandate."

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Texas Antiquities Committee members files

Dates: c. 1969-c. 1991

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Obsolete record series? Yes
Replaced by: none

Ongoing record series? No
Annual accumulation:

Agency holdings:

These files were transferred recently to the Archives and Information Services Division.

Description:

This series contains lists of members, correspondence with the Texas State Historical Survey Committee about the formation of an antiquities board and initial appointments, clippings, correspondence with the members, letters of appointment, resumes, clippings, and vouchers. Dates covered are c. 1969-c. 1991. Correspondents include commission members, agency staff, other state agencies and officials, professional historians and archeologists, and other individuals. Files do not appear to be present for all members who served during those years. The most significant files appear to be those for Dr. Fred Wendorf and Dr. William Holden, both serving as chairmen of the committee, and Curtis Tunnell, who served on the committee for 14 years, several as vice-chairman, before leaving to become the director of the Texas Historical Commission. For the correspondence files of Dr. W.W. Newcomb, director of the Texas Memorial Museum and a statutory member of the Antiquities Committee, see the series Texas Antiquities Committee, administrative correspondence files of Dr. W.W. Newcomb.

Purpose:

These records were created in the interaction between the agency and commission members and inform commission members of upcoming meetings and significant issues the agency wished them to consider.

Agency program:

Texas Antiquities Committee was created by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session (1969). The Committee was initially composed of seven members–Director of the State Historical Survey Committee, Director of Parks and Wildlife Department, Commissioner of the General Land Office, State Archeologist (whose office was transferred in 1969 from the State Building Commission to the Texas State Historical Survey Committee), one professional archeologist from a recognized museum or institution of higher learning, one professional Texas historian, and the Director of the Texas Memorial Museum of the University of Texas. The makeup of the Committee when it expired in 1995 was a nine-member commission. It consisted of six ex-officio members, including the chairperson of the Texas Historical Commission or his/her designee, the State Archaeologist, the Director of the Parks and Wildlife Department, the Commissioner of the General Land Office, the State Engineer, and the Executive Director of the Texas Department of Water Resources. The three other members were appointed by the Governor with concurrence of the Senate, for two-year terms. These appointed members consisted of a professional historian, a professional archaeologist, and a professional museum director.

This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Texas Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by member, then in reverse chronological order.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? None

Gaps:

Files are not present after 1991, and files are not present for all commission members who served between 1969 and 1991.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule: Not on schedule

Suggested series from state records retention schedule: None, this is an obsolete series

Archival holdings:

Texas Antiquities Committee members files, c. 1969-c. 1991, 0.75 cubic ft.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents some of the interaction between the agency and commission members, serving as the correspondence files of this committee. Although many of the materials in this series are routine–vouchers and notices of upcoming meetings, there is still some significant materials which document some actions of the committee, especially in the files of the chairmen and vice-chairmen. Because there is some evidential value in these files, this series has been appraised to be archival. It has already been transferred to the Library and Archives Commission and does not appear on the schedule of the Historical Commission.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Texas Antiquities Committee, administrative correspondence files of
Dr. W.W. Newcomb

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Obsolete record series? Yes
Replaced by: none

Ongoing record series? No
Annual accumulation:

Agency holdings:

These files were transferred recently to the Archives and Information Services Division.

Description:

These are the correspondence files of Dr. W.W. Newcomb, the director of the Texas Memorial Museum and a statutory member of the Committee. The files date from 1969-1978. Types of materials present include correspondence, papers, reports, notes concerning the Platoro lawsuit, minutes, agenda, contracts, and budget data. Topics discussed include hiring of a marine archeologist, permit applications, upcoming meetings, surveys, the Platoro lawsuit, treasure hunting, research, and the committee’s budget. Dr. W.W. Newcomb served on the Texas Antiquities Committee from its inception in 1969 until 1978 when he resigned as director of the Texas Memorial Museum. As director of the museum, he was a statutory member of the board. For board information and correspondence files of other Antiquities Committee members, see the series Texas Antiquities Committee members files. A resolution commemorating Dr. Newcomb’s service on the committee can be found in his file as part of the aforementioned series.

Purpose:

These records were created by the activities of Dr. W.W. Newcomb as a member of the Texas Antiquities Committee and document some actions taken by the Committee.

Agency program:

Texas Antiquities Committee was created by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session (1969). The Committee was initially composed of seven members–Director of the State Historical Survey Committee, Director of Parks and Wildlife Department, Commissioner of the General Land Office, State Archeologist (whose office was transferred in 1969 from the State Building Commission to the Texas State Historical Survey Committee), one professional archeologist from a recognized museum or institution of higher learning, one professional Texas historian, and the Director of the Texas Memorial Museum of the University of Texas. The makeup of the Committee when it expired in 1995 was a nine-member commission. It consisted of six ex-officio members, including the chairperson of the Texas Historical Commission or his/her designee, the State Archaeologist, the Director of the Parks and Wildlife Department, the Commissioner of the General Land Office, the State Engineer, and the Executive Director of the Texas Department of Water Resources. The three other members were appointed by the Governor with concurrence of the Senate, for two-year terms. These appointed members consisted of a professional historian, a professional archaeologist, and a professional museum director.

This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Texas Antiquities Code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Arranged in reverse chronological order

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? None

Gaps: None known

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule: Not on schedule.

Suggested series from state records retention schedule: None, this is an obsolete series.

Archival holdings:

Texas Antiquities Committee, administrative correspondence files of Dr. W.W. Newcomb, 1969-1978, 1.4 cubic ft.

Appraisal decision:

This series documents the activities of Dr. W.W. Newcomb as a member of the Texas Antiquities Committee and some actions taken by the Committee. This is the highest level correspondence series from the committee. Much of the correspondence is substantial, discussing agency policies, projects, events (such as the Platoro lawsuit, treasure hunting, etc.), and the running of the agency. Because these files document many of the activities of the Dr. Newcomb and the Antiquities Committee, this series has been appraised to be archival. It has already been transferred to the Library and Archives Commission and does not appear on the schedule of the Historical Commission.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Governor’s Office on Antiquities files

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Obsolete record series? Yes
Replaced by: none

Ongoing record series? No
Annual accumulation:

Agency holdings:

These files were transferred recently to the Archives and Information Services Division.

Description:

This series contains two sets of files. The first concerns the Governor’s Conference on Antiquities, held in Lubbock in October 1969. Files present include correspondence, mailing lists, agenda, and an edited copy of Governor Preston Smith’s speech. The other set of files documents Governor Smith’s tour of Indian pictographs in November 1969 and the formation of the Amistad National Recreation area, dating 1969-1970. Materials in this series consist of clippings and photographs.

Related materials may be present with the records of Governor Preston Smith, held at the Southwest Collection of Texas Tech University in Lubbock.

The Governor’s Conference on Antiquities was held on October 17 and 18, 1969 in Lubbock, Texas. The purpose of the conference was to exchange information and opinions among those concerned with the preservation and proper utilization of Texas antiquities. Sessions presented included discussions of the (then) new Texas Antiquities Code, federal antiquities laws, underwater archeology, and (then) current programs of historical and archeological preservation in Texas.

Purpose:

These records were created by the activities of the Governor’s Office in relation to archeological concerns shortly after passage of the Texas Antiquities Code.

Agency program:

Texas Antiquities Committee was created by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session (1969). The Committee was initially composed of seven members–Director of the State Historical Survey Committee, Director of Parks and Wildlife Department, Commissioner of the General Land Office, State Archeologist (whose office was transferred in 1969 from the State Building Commission to the Texas State Historical Survey Committee), one professional archeologist from a recognized museum or institution of higher learning, one professional Texas historian, and the Director of the Texas Memorial Museum of the University of Texas. The makeup of the Committee when it expired in 1995 was a nine-member commission. It consisted of six ex-officio members, including the chairperson of the Texas Historical Commission or his/her designee, the State Archaeologist, the Director of the Parks and Wildlife Department, the Commissioner of the General Land Office, the State Engineer, and the Executive Director of the Texas Department of Water Resources. The three other members were appointed by the Governor with concurrence of the Senate, for two-year terms. These appointed members consisted of a professional historian, a professional archaeologist, and a professional museum director.

This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Texas Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Topical

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? None

Gaps: None known.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records: None

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule: Not on schedule

Suggested series from state records retention schedule: None, this is an obsolete series

Archival holdings:

Governor’s Office on Antiquities files, 1969-1970, 0.1 cubic ft.

Appraisal decision:

This series concerns activities of the Governor’s Office with the preservation of archaeological resources in the state. Although program papers are not present from the conference, what little material remains does provide some early documentation of the governor’s office relations with the Antiquities Committee. Also, the information on and photographs of the Indian rock art and the Amistad National Recreation area document state efforts at the preservation and documentation of Indian rock art, a valuable archeological resource in the state. Because of the informational value of these materials and the importance of these events, especially occurring so soon after the establishment of the Texas Antiquities Code, this series has been appraised to be archival. It has already been transferred to the Library and Archives Commission and does not appear on the schedule of the Historical Commission.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Texas Antiquities Code legislation and subject files

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Obsolete record series? Yes
Replaced by: none

Ongoing record series? No
Annual accumulation:

Agency holdings:

These files were transferred recently to the Archives and Information Services Division.

Description:

This series contains correspondence, drafts and final copies of bills, a bill analysis, and a newsletter article about the proposed antiquities code. Most of the materials are from 1969 and concern the efforts of the Texas State Historical Survey Committee and others to pass antiquities legislation in the Texas Legislature, which was finally done in 1969, becoming the Texas Antiquities Code of Texas, effective September 1969 (Vernon’s Civ. St., Art. 6145-9). There are also some legislative materials present from 1981, 1985, and 1987 concerning several archeological topics, including archeological salvage in state sponsored reservoir projects, disturbing Indian burials, historic structures as state archeological landmarks, and display of Texas Antiquities Committee-managed artifacts by other agencies and institutions.

Purpose:

These records were created in the effort to create the Texas Antiquities Code and provide documentation of subsequent antiquities legislation.

Agency program:

Texas Antiquities Committee was created by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session (1969). The Committee was initially composed of seven members–Director of the State Historical Survey Committee, Director of Parks and Wildlife Department, Commissioner of the General Land Office, State Archeologist (whose office was transferred in 1969 from the State Building Commission to the Texas State Historical Survey Committee), one professional archeologist from a recognized museum or institution of higher learning, one professional Texas historian, and the Director of the Texas Memorial Museum of the University of Texas. The makeup of the Committee when it expired in 1995 was a nine-member commission. It consisted of six ex-officio members, including the chairperson of the Texas Historical Commission or his/her designee, the State Archaeologist, the Director of the Parks and Wildlife Department, the Commissioner of the General Land Office, the State Engineer, and the Executive Director of the Texas Department of Water Resources. The three other members were appointed by the Governor with concurrence of the Senate, for two-year terms. These appointed members consisted of a professional historian, a professional archaeologist, and a professional museum director. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Texas Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Arranged roughly by topics, then in reverse chronological order. Materials are not foldered.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: unknown

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:

Bill files from 1969 concerning antiquities legislation can be found in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission. Bill files from the 1980s can be found in the Legislative Reference Library.

Publications based on records:

Bills adopted as law are published in the General and Special Laws for each legislative session.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule: Not on schedule

Suggested series from state records retention schedule: None, this is an obsolete series.

Archival holdings:

Texas Antiquities Code legislation and subject files, 1969, 1981, 1985, 1987, 0.1 cubic ft.

Appraisal decision:

This series provides some documentation concerning the creation of the Texas Antiquities Code and subsequent antiquities legislation. The passage of this code was a significant piece of legislation, creating rules and regulations to protect and preserve archeological resources. The correspondence shows efforts of the historical and archeological communities to get such legislation passed. Because of the informational and evidential value of these files, this series has been appraised to be archival. It has already been transferred to the Library and Archives Commission and does not appear on the schedule of the Historical Commission.

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Records Series Review
Series Title: Texas Antiquities Committee 20th Anniversary files

Agency: Texas Historical Commission
Archeology Division (former Division of Antiquities Protection)

Obsolete record series? Yes
Replaced by: none

Ongoing record series? No
Annual accumulation:

Agency holdings:

These files were transferred recently to the Archives and Information Services Division.

Description:

This series contains photographs, negatives, and contact sheets; newsletters; press releases and clippings; drafts of articles and printed materials commemorating the anniversary; printed materials about current antiquities programs; and certificates presented to agencies and individuals for their efforts in the preservation of archeological resources. Materials are dated in 1989. The Antiquities Committee celebrated its 20th anniversary in 1989. Materials documenting the committee and its work through enforcement of the Texas Antiquities Code were printed and distributed to county offices, through the Medallion–the newsletter of the Historical Commission, to various newspapers, and through an exhibit at the Capitol. The photographs appear to be from an Antiquities Committee meeting, showing shots of members during the meeting and the presentation of certificates to state officials and others.

Purpose:

These records were created to publicize the 20th anniversary of the Texas Antiquities Committee and the work it has accomplished through antiquities legislation and its archeological programs.

Agency program:

Texas Antiquities Committee was created by Senate Bill 58, 61st Legislature, 2nd Called Session (1969). The Committee was initially composed of seven members–Director of the State Historical Survey Committee, Director of Parks and Wildlife Department, Commissioner of the General Land Office, State Archeologist (whose office was transferred in 1969 from the State Building Commission to the Texas State Historical Survey Committee), one professional archeologist from a recognized museum or institution of higher learning, one professional Texas historian, and the Director of the Texas Memorial Museum of the University of Texas. The makeup of the Committee when it expired in 1995 was a nine-member commission. It consisted of six ex-officio members, including the chairperson of the Texas Historical Commission or his/her designee, the State Archaeologist, the Director of the Parks and Wildlife Department, the Commissioner of the General Land Office, the State Engineer, and the Executive Director of the Texas Department of Water Resources. The three other members were appointed by the Governor with concurrence of the Senate, for two-year terms. These appointed members consisted of a professional historian, a professional archaeologist, and a professional museum director. This committee was the legal custodian of all state archaeological resources and it adopted rules to protect and preserve these resources. It designated state archaeological landmarks, issued permits for activities that impacted archeological sites, oversaw staff efforts to ensure compliance with the Texas Antiquities code, maintained an inventory of items recovered and retained by the State of Texas, and contracted or otherwise provided for discovery operations and scientific investigations of sunken or abandoned ships and their contents. In 1995 the committee was abolished (Senate Bill 365, 74th Legislature, Regular Session). Its duties were absorbed by the Texas Historical Commission and are carried out through its Archeology Division.

V.T.C.A., Natural Resources Code, Title 9, Chapter 191 (Antiquities Code)
National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, amended (16 U.S.C. 470)

Arrangement: Arranged by record type.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Gaps: It is unknown what other records the Committee created to commemorate this anniversary.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Publications based on records:

Articles based on the press releases were printed in several newspapers, a newsletter was sent to the county historical commissions, and an article was printed in the Medallion.

Previous destructions:

Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Texas Antiquities Committee and the Texas Historical Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Series data from agency schedule: Not on schedule

Suggested data from the state records retention schedule: None, this is an obsolete series.

Archival holdings:

Texas Antiquities Committee 20th Anniversary files, 1989, fractional.

Appraisal decision:

This series provides some summary documentation of the activities of the Texas Antiquities Committee over the first 20 years of its existence. Although these are printed materials for the most part, this series has been appraised to be archival for the information value it contains about the history of the Committee. It has already been transferred to the Library and Archives Commission and does not appear on the schedule of the Historical Commission.

Page last modified: August 31, 2011