Records Appraisal Report:
Railroad Commission, Part One

Contents of this report
Agency Contact | Agency History | Project Review | Record Series Reviews

Internal links to series reviews
Legislative appropriation requests
Meeting agenda and minutes
Organization charts
Annual financial report
Strategic plans
Administrative correspondence
Speeches and papers
Legal opinions and advice
News and/or press releases
PIO news clips
Correspondence, administrative
Executive orders
Speeches and papers
Reports, annual and biennial (narrative)
Agency rules, policies and procedures
Plans and planning records
Reports and studies
Publication development files
Monthly Summary of Texas Natural Gas
Notices and orders
Rule 37 hearings
Transcripts of testimony
Hearing files
FERC filings
Wildcat and suspense files
Oil and gas potential files
Schedule reports
Oil and gas production reports
Oil and gas status reports
Maps: paper
Geographic Information System, oil and gas map layer
ST-1: Application for Texas severance tax incentive certification
ST-2: Application for Texas individual 3-year inactive wellbore certification
GC-1: Gas well capability
H-8: Crude oil, gas well liquids, or associated products loss report
Reports for market demand
MD-1: Optional operator market demand forecast for gas well gas in prorated fields
Plants/refinery reports
P-18: Skim oil/condensate report
H-1: Application to inject fluid into a reservoir productive of oil or gas (denied)
H-1A: Injection well data for H1 application (denied)
W-14: Application to dispose of oil and gas waste by injection into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas (active)
W-14: Application to dispose of oil and gas waste by injection into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas (denied)
W-14: Application to dispose of oil and gas waste by injection into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas (cancelled)
Exceptions to statewide rules 9 and 46
H-5: Disposal injection well pressure test report
P-13: Application of landowner to condition an abandoned well for fresh water production
H-11: Application for permit to maintain and use a pit (active)
H-11: Application for permit to maintain and use pit (denied/cancelled)
H-11: Application for permit to maintain and use a pit (returned/withdrawn)
Active landfarming permits
Landfarming permits: denied/cancelled
Landfarming permits: returned/withdrawn
Stationary treatment facilities - active
Stationary treatment facilities: denied/cancelled
Stationary treatment facilities: returned/withdrawn
Pit minor permits
R-8/active: authority to discharge oil/gas wastes from a gas plant into various disposal sites
R-8: Cancelled, denied, withdrawn and expired
Discharge permits: active
Discharge permits: cancelled, denied, withdrawn and expired
Discharge minor permits
Reports, studies and surveys (raw data), fresh water, hazardous waste, gas plants
Hazardous oil and gas waste generators
Hauler permits and reports: microformat, expired/cancelled, 1967-1992
Hauler permits and reports: active
Hauler permits and reports: expired/cancelled
Hauler permits and reports: cancelled through enforcement
Water quality certifications and coastal management program consistency reviews
H-4: Application to create, operate and maintain an underground hydrocarbon storage facility
Brine mining permits
Mechanical integrity tests
Sonar surveys
Abandoned site candidate
Coastal facility certification files

Related report
Railroad Commission Part Two

Archival finding aid
Railroad Commission of Texas: An Overview of Records at the Texas State Archives, 1836-1867, 1873-1885, 1890-2001 (bulk 1891-1996)


Laura K. Saegert, Appraisal Archivist, March 16, 2001


Agency Contact

This agency contact information was current at the time of the report but may have changed in the interim. Please call (512-463-5455) for current contact information of the agency's records manager or records liaison for these records.

Susan L. Cisco, Ph.D., CRM
Assistant Director
Information Management Services Oil and Gas Division
Railroad Commission of Texas
William B. Travis Bldg.
1701 N. Congress, Suite G-106
Austin, TX 78701


Agency History and Structure

The Railroad Commission of Texas had its origin in the demands of the shipping public in the late 1880s that insisted that railroads be subject to regulation based on public interest. An advocate for governmental regulation, Attorney General James Stephen Hogg ran for Governor in 1890 with the issue of railroad regulation as the focal point of the campaign. Hogg was elected Governor in the general election and the voters also approved an amendment to Article X, Section 2 of the Texas Constitution that empowered the Legislature to enact statutes creating regulatory agencies. These elections paved the way for the Legislature to enact on April 3, 1891 "An Act to Establish a Railroad Commission of the State of Texas," that later was placed in the Texas Revised Civil Statutes under article 6444 et seq. (House Bills 1, 3, and 58, 22nd Legislature, Regular Session).

The Commission originally consisted of three members appointed by the Governor for three-year terms. Governor Hogg appointed the first three Commissioners in 1891 including John H. Reagan, who resigned as U.S. Senator from Texas to serve as the first Chairman. The Texas Constitution, Article XIX, Section 30 was amended in 1894 to provide for elective six-year overlapping terms for the Commissioners. That same year John H. Reagan was elected and served until his retirement in 1903.

The Texas Railroad Commission was the first regulatory agency created in the State of Texas and originally had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. The legal focus was on intrastate passenger and freight activities. Interstate jurisdiction fell under the U.S. Interstate Commerce Commission. For the first twenty-five years of its existence, the Railroad Commission was largely concerned with regulating railroads, setting rates, receiving complaints, and making investigations. As other controversies arose where the Legislature deemed that the public interest could best be served by regulation, additional duties were assigned to the Railroad Commission.

The Railroad Commission's authority was broadened beginning in 1917 with the passage of the Pipeline Petroleum Law, Senate Bill 68, 35th Legislature, Regular Session, that declared pipelines to be common carriers like railroads and placed them under the Commission's jurisdiction. This was the first act to designate the Railroad Commission as the agency to administer conservation laws relating to oil and gas.

The Commission's regulatory and enforcement powers in oil and gas were increased by Senate Bill 350 of the 36th Legislature, Regular Session, the Oil and Gas Conservation Law, effective June 18, 1919. This act gave the Railroad Commission jurisdiction to regulate the production of oil and gas. Acting upon this legislation, the Commission adopted in 1919 the first statewide rules regulating the oil and gas industry to promote conservation and safety, including Rule 37. This rule requires minimum distances between wells at drilling sites in order to protect field pressure and correlative rights.

The Gas Utilities Act of 1920, House Bill 11, 36th Legislature, 3rd Called Session, gave the Commission regulatory and rate authority over individuals and businesses producing, transporting, or distributing natural gas in Texas. In 1937, following a large natural gas explosion in a school in New London, Texas, the 45th Legislature passed legislation giving the Railroad Commission the authority to adopt rules and regulations pertaining to the odorization of natural gas or liquefied petroleum gases (House Bill 1017, Regular Session). The passage of the Public Regulatory Act of 1975 (PURA), House Bill 819, 64th Legislature, Regular Session, required certain state regulatory agencies, including the Commission, to set the overall revenues of a utility based on its "cost of service."

Regulation of liquefied petroleum was added to the Commission's responsibilities in 1939 by House Bill 792, 46th Legislature, Regular Session. The legislation authorized the Commission to adopt and enforce safety rules and standards in the storage, handling, transportation, and odorization of butane or LP-gases. Regulation of compressed natural gas was added to the Railroad Commission's responsibilities in 1983 (Senate Bill 617, 68th Legislature, Regular Session).

The Motor Bus Law of 1927, House Bill 50, 40th Legislature, Regular Session, and the Motor Carrier Law of 1929, House Bill 654, 41st Legislature, Regular Session, extended the Commission's regulatory powers to commercial transportation of persons and property on state highways. In 1995, following federal deregulation of motor carriers, the 74th Legislature eliminated the agency's authority to regulate commercial carriers involved in intrastate transport and transferred the remaining responsibilities related to commercial carriers (motor carrier registration, insurance verification, and safety) to the Texas Department of Transportation (Senate Bill 971, Regular Session), and the Department of Public Safety (Senate Bill 3, Regular Session).

The Texas Surface Mining and Reclamation Act of 1975, Senate Bill 55, 64th Legislature, Regular Session, authorized the Commission to regulate the exploration for and surface mining of coal, lignite, and uranium within the state and to oversee the reclamation of lands disturbed by surface mining operations. In 1991, the 72nd Legislature, Regular Session, passed House Bill 451, the Texas Aggregate Quarry and Pit Safety Act, that authorized the Commission to regulate quarry and pit operations.

The Commission's authority over railroads diminished over the latter half of the twentieth century. The Federal Railroad Safety Act of 1970 vested rail safety responsibilities in the Federal Railroad Administration. In 1980, the Federal Staggers Rail Act largely eliminated the Commission's responsibility for setting rates for intrastate railroads. By 1984, the Commission ceased its role in the economic regulation of the Texas rail industry. Regulatory powers over rail safety were granted to the agency in 1985 when the 69th Legislature authorized the Commission to implement a rail safety program in conjunction with the Federal Railroad Administration Act of 1970 (Senate Bill 444, 69th Legislature, Regular Session).

The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

In 1999, the agency had approximately 848 FTE (full-time equivalent) employees. Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Gas Services Division works to ensure that a continuous safe supply of gas is available to Texas consumers at the lowest, reasonable rates. The division establishes rates and services that are fair and reasonable for gas utilities and their customers; enforces those rates; maintains safety standards in the gas and hazardous liquids pipeline systems throughout the state by inspection and investigation of any hazards or accidents; oversees intrastate gathering and storage services; and adopts and maintains adequate safety rules and standards in the handling, transportation, and odorization of LP-gases (liquefied petroleum gases) for dealers, handlers, and consumers. It further regulates propane and compressed natural gas by requiring anyone working with these gases to pass a written qualifying exam administered by the Commission. The division also focuses on regulatory policy and analysis as well as identifying and eliminating natural gas transportation problems. There are four main sections in this division - Audit, Liquefied Petroleum Gas, Pipeline Safety, and Regulatory and Analysis.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management, and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit, which includes Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging.

The Surface Mining and Reclamation Division oversees the exploration of and surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel and the reclamation of land disturbed by surface mining operations. It also conducts a program for reclaiming lands that were mined before 1975 and left unrestored. Companies must have a permit from the commission for each mining site operated in the state. Before permits are issued, the companies must submit a performance bond that will provide funds for reclamation if the company fails to do an adequate reclamation job. The division also studies mining sites to ensure the mining will not harm the quality or quantity of water in the area. It determines which abandoned mines pose the greatest threat to public health and safety and the environment, and designs a reclamation plan to address the greatest problems. Private contractors are used to do the reclamation.

The Rail Division is responsible for checking equipment and track, railroad and signal operations, and hazardous material handling; conducting investigations of accidents and complaints concerning railroads; and securing federal funds to improve branch lines and preserve rail service to rural areas. The Division enforces rules aimed at removing obstructions on railroad rights-of-way and operates a crossing safety education program. There are two main sections in this division - Rail Safety and Rail Planning.

The Office of the General Counsel is the enforcement branch of the agency. It provides legal support through five sections: Enforcement, Gas Utilities and LP-Gas, General Law, Oil and Gas, and Surface Mining. The Enforcement Section handles enforcement cases for all the agency's regulatory areas and ensures the commissions orders and rules are followed. The Gas Utilities and LP-Gas Section handle rate-setting cases for gas transportation and utility companies and safety compliance cases involving the natural gas, LP-gas, and compressed natural gas industries, as well as cases involving enforcement of the gas utility tax. The General Law Section provides legal research and advice to staff and provides staff attorneys for complex hearings arising in other divisions. It also tracks proposed state regulations and reviews submissions to the Texas Register. The Oil and Gas Section holds hearings on matters dealing with producing, storing, transporting, reclaiming, and processing oil and gas. It also conducts hearings to determine responsibility for the proper plugging of abandoned wells and preventing and controlling oil and gas pollution. The Surface Mining Section reviews and processes applications for permits, revisions, renewals, variances, and bond releases. It also conducts rule-making hearings involving surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; abandoned mine land reclamation; and safety of quarries and pits. It also holds hearings involving new and amended authority, rates, new or amended rules, and compliance with rules and statutes.

The Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division works to educate the public and conduct research on LP-gas and other environmentally beneficial fuels. The division is currently researching the contribution of propane to cleaner air and is developing marketing, advertising, and informational programs about propane.

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Project Review

I was assigned to review the records of this agency in late October 1999. I have reviewed the agency history in the Guide to Texas State Agencies (1999, 10th ed.; 1996, 9th ed.; 1978, 5th ed.); Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; Texas Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81; Texas Administrative Code, Title 16, Part 1; the Sunset Advisory Commission report on the agency, 1982; several reports produced by the Railroad Commission -- Annual financial report for FY 1999; Request for Legislative Appropriations for FY 2000-2001; the Strategic plan for 1999-2003; the Oil and Gas Division Annual Report, 1936, 1939, 1996; Permitting Services and Production Services Sections: a filing procedures manual, 1999; and information from the RRC's web site, including an agency history and the duties and responsibilities of the various divisions of the agency. I have reviewed the destruction requests from the Railroad Commission, the RRC records retention schedule, unscheduled records at the Railroad Commission, and the records of the Commission already housed in the State Archives.

The current retention schedule of the Railroad Commission has five archival series listed and thirty-five series listed for archival review. Several of the series are in a section of the schedule labeled "Administrative records - agency wide." Most of the agency-wide series contain records from more than one division so some series will appear more than once in the appraisal report.

There are several situations where separate series exist for paper and microfilm formats of the same series, with the microfilm record series having an archival code of R, the paper record series having no archival code. In these cases, there will be two listings for the series - the series of microfilm records will be in the list of series being reviewed containing archival codes. The series of paper records will be in the list of series being reviewed without archival codes. In these situations, one records series review covers both formats.

There are forty-six archival/archival review records series being reviewed. These series are:

Administrative records

Legislative Appropriation Requests
Meeting agenda and minutes
Organization charts

Administrative records - Automation records (Information Technology Services Division)

Plans and planning records

Commissioner's Offices

Administrative correspondence
Speeches

Executive directors

Administrative correspondence (described in same series review with the administrative correspondence of the Commissioners)

Office of the General Counsel

Legal opinions and advice

Public Information Office

PIO News clips (paper/microfilm)
News and/or press releases (paper/microfilm)

Finance and Administration Division

Correspondence, administrative

Oil and Gas Division

Executive orders
Plans and planning records
Agency rules, policies and procedures
Publication development files
Reports and studies (non-fiscal)
Speeches and papers
Reports, annual and biennial

Oil and Gas Division - Permitting

Monthly summary of Texas Natural Gas

Rail Division

Administrative correspondence
Railroad abandonments in Texas

Gas Services Division - Regulatory Analysis and Policy

Administrative correspondence
Speeches and papers
Gas utilities litigation files (microfilm)
Plans and planning records (microfilm)

Surface Mining and Reclamation Division

Executive orders
Administrative correspondence
Publication development files
Reports and studies (non-fiscal)
Abandoned mine lands files (microfilm)
Coal mining permit applications, issued (microfilm)
Coal mining permit files (microfilm)
Plans and planning records
Correspondence - administrative (court cases) (paper)
Correspondence - administrative (court cases) (microfilm)
Correspondence - administrative (SMRD rules files) (paper)
Correspondence - administrative (SMRD rules files) (microfilm)
SMRD rules and regulations
Interim SMRD rules
Mining statistics reports (annual) (paper)
Mining statistics reports (annual) (microfilm)
Uranium mining permit applications (paper)
Uranium mining permit applications (microfilm)
Uranium mining permit files (paper)
Uranium mining permit files (microfilm)
Camp Swift Study

There are five series coded for archival review on the schedule that we are not reviewing, reasons given as follows:

Administrative records - Agency wide

Customer surveys - This series carries the record series code formerly used for the series Reports and studies, thus it had an archival review code of R on the retention schedule. Customer surveys is a series we will not review.

Litigation files - Since this series is listed on the schedule for each division that holds litigation files, this series should not be listed in the agency-wide section. We are reviewing the litigation series of the divisions.

Administrative records - Support Services

Building construction project files and Building plans and specifications (state-owned) - Neither of these series is being reviewed as the agency does not hold original blueprints or project files, they are maintained by the General Services Commission.

Liquefied Petroleum Gas - Training and Education

Training material (critique sheets, technical courses and workshops) - this series is miscoded and should not have an R code. It will not be reviewed. The agency publishes several manuals and handbooks re: LP-Gas that provide sufficient coverage of training/education activities re: LP-Gas. The manuals and handbooks are considered agency publications and are sent regularly to the Publications Depository Program.

There are 130 series of possible archival value not coded for archival review on the schedule we decided to review primarily because of their long (usually 100 years) retention periods. These series are:

Public Information Office

Photographic file

Finance and Administration Division

Annual financial report (reviewed in place of an agency annual/biennial report)

Oil and Gas Division

Notices and orders (paper)
Notices and orders (microfilm)
Transcripts of testimony
Rule 37 hearings (paper)
Rule 37 hearings (microfilm)
Hearing files (paper)
Hearing files (microfilm)
FERC filings (paper/microfilm)

Oil and Gas Division - Well information

Wildcat and suspense files (paper/microfilm)
Oil and gas potential files (paper/microfilm)
Schedule reports (paper/microfilm)
Oil and gas production reports (paper/microfilm)
Oil and gas status reports (paper/microfilm)
Maps and miscellaneous (microfilm), no longer filmed
Tank cleaning and tank reports (paper/microfilm)

Oil and Gas Division - Mapping

Maps: paper
Maps: microformat

Oil and Gas Division - Oil and Gas Proration Unit

ST-1: Application for Texas severance tax Incentive certification (paper/microfilm)
ST-2: Application for Texas individual 3-year inactive wellbore certification (paper/microfilm)
GC-1: Gas well capability (paper/microfilm)
H-8: Crude oil, gas wells, liquids, or associated products loss report (paper/microfilm)

Oil and Gas Division - Market Demand Forecast

Reports for market demand (paper/microfilm)
MD-1: Optional market demand forecast for gas well gas in prorated fields (paper/microfilm)

Oil and Gas Division - Production Services

Plans/refinery reports (paper/microfilm)
P-18: Skim oil/condensate report (paper/microfilm)

Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Injection Control

H-1: Application to inject fluid into a reservoir productive of oil or gas (denied) (paper/microfilm)
H-1A: Injection well data for H-1 application (denied) (paper/microfilm)
W-14: Application to dispose of oil and gas waste by injection into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas (active)
W-14: denied (paper/microfilm)
W-14: canceled (paper/microfilm)
Exceptions to statewide rules 9 and 46 (paper/microfilm)
H-5: Disposal injection well pressure test report (paper)
H-10: Annual disposal/injection well monitoring report (microfilm)
H-10: Annual disposal/injection well monitoring report (paper)
P-13: Application of landowner to condition an abandoned well for fresh water production (paper/microfilm)

Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Waste Management

H-11: Application for permit to maintain and use a pit (active)
Commercial H-11: denied/cancelled
Non-commercial H-11: denied/cancelled
Commercial H-11: returned/withdrawn
Non-commercial H-11: returned/withdrawn
Active landfarming permits
Commercial landfarming permits
Non-commercial landfarming permits: denied/cancelled
Commercial landfarming permits: returned/withdrawn
Non-commercial landfarming permits: returned/withdrawn (paper/microfilm)
Stationary treatment facilities: active
Commercial stationary treatment facilities: denied/canceled
Non-commercial stationary treatment facilities: denied/canceled
Commercial stationary treatment facilities
Non-commercial stationary treatment facilities: returned/withdrawn (paper/microfilm)
Pit minor permits (paper/microfilm)
R-8/active: authority to discharge oil/gas wastes from a gas plant into various disposal sites
R-8: Cancelled, denied, withdrawn and expired (paper/microfilm)
Discharge permits: active (paper/microfilm)
Discharge permits: canceled, denied, withdrawn, expired (paper/microfilm)
Discharge minor permits (paper/microfilm)
Reports, studies, surveys (raw data) - fresh water, hazardous waste, gas plants (paper/microfilm)
Hazardous oil and gas waste generators
Hauler permits and reports: microformat, expired/canceled, 1967-1992
Hauler permits and reports: active
Hauler permits and reports: expired/canceled
Hauler permits and reports: canceled through enforcement
Water quality certifications and coastal management program consistency reviews, (paper/microfilm)

Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Hydrocarbon Storage

H-4: Application to create, operate and maintain an underground hydrocarbon storage facility
Brine mining permits
echanical integrity tests
Sonar surveys

Oil and Gas Division - Site Remediation

Abandoned site candidate (paper/microfilm)
Abandoned site cleanup (paper/microfilm)
Coastal facility certification files (paper/microfilm)
Operator/responsible party cleanup files (paper/microfilm)

Oil and Gas Division - Permitting

Organization report (paper/microfilm)
W-1X: Application for future re-entry of inactive wellbore and 14(B)(2) extension permit (paper/microfilm)
Reclamation plant permits: active and inactive
H-15: Test on an inactive well more than 25 years: old, type B: mechanical integrity test (paper/microfilm)

Oil and Gas Division - Permitting, Engineering Unit

Engineering miscellaneous filming (microfilm)

Oil and Gas Division - Compliance/Well Plugging, Field Operations, Austin Headquarters

H-9: Certificate of compliance statewide rule 36 (hydrogen sulfide) (paper/microfilm)
Seismic well files: non permitted (paper/microfilm)
Cathodic wells (paper/microfilm)

Oil and Gas Division - Compliance/Well Plugging, State Funded Plugging

Wells plugged with state funds (paper/microfilm)
Wells plugged with state funds: salvage (paper/microfilm)
Closed administrative penalty cases (paper/microfilm)

Oil and Gas Division - Field operation, District offices

Complaint files/pollution: water well contamination
D-forms (pollution/water well contamination)

Rail Division

Maps, territory, rail safety inspection

Gas Services Division - Gas Utility Audit

Annual financial reports (gas utility companies) (paper)
Annual financial reports (gas utility companies) (microfilm)

Gas Services Division - Pipeline Safety

Annual reports, pipeline companies
Pipeline related: Accident files reports and associated documentation
Special investigation files - hazardous liquids and natural gas pipelines
Digital data pipeline map files - electronic
Pipeline map source data
Computer produced pipeline map output

Gas Services Division - Regulatory Analysis and Policy

FERC filings (paper)
FERC filings (microfilm)
Gas utilities docket files/transcripts/exhibits (paper)
Gas utilities docket transcripts/exhibits (microfilm)
Special project files (paper/microfilm)

Liquefied Petroleum Gas - Section wide

Docket files (paper)
Docket files (microfilm)
Docket files - transcripts/exhibits (microfilm)
Docket files - exceptions (paper)
Docket files - exceptions (without dismissal orders) (microfilm)
Docket files - exceptions (with dismissal orders) (microfilm)

Liquefied Petroleum Gas - Plans/Accidents

Master files - Engineering data base - electronic
Engineering summary report
Manufacturers data report for pressure vessels (paper)
Manufacturers data report for pressure vessels (illegible) (paper)
Manufacturers data report for pressure vessels (microfilm)
Manufacturers storage container report of pressure vessel repair, modification, testing, and testing lab results (paper)
Manufacturers storage container report of pressure vessel repair, modification, testing, and testing lab results (microfilm)

Surface Mining and Reclamation Division

Abandoned mine lands files (paper)
Abandoned mine lands planning files
Coal mining permit applications, issued (paper)
Coal mining permit applications, dismissed (paper)
Coal mining permit applications, dismissed (microfilm)
Coal mining permit files (paper)
Office of Surface Mining administrative record
Lands unsuitable petitions (paper)
Lands unsuitable petitions (microfilm)
Quarry and pit "pit" files (paper)
Quarry and pit "pit" files (microfilm)
Quarry and pit database
Quarry and pit administrative files (paper)
Quarry and pit administrative files (microfilm)
Abandoned mine lands, south, east, west Texas inventory (paper)
Abandoned mine lands, south, east, west Texas inventory (microfilm)
Abandoned mine lands, south, east, west Texas inventory (database)

There are five series of current or recent records not on the schedule being reviewed:

Administrative records

Strategic plans

Oil and Gas Division - Mapping

Geographic Information System, oil and gas map layer

Rail Division

Annual reports of railroad companies
Tariff files
Geographic Information System, rail maps layer

Lastly, there are 43 series or groups of old records housed in the Central Records area of the Oil and Gas Division that either do not belong to a current series, the current series cannot be determined with assurance, or were removed from an existing series years ago (such as individual hearing files) and exist as separate entities. Records series reviews have been completed for these old records. If the series the records were formerly part of is known, that is noted; if a correlation with a current series is likely or possible, that is noted. Staff in the Central Records area were able to provide a minimal amount of information about the contents within the boxes, generally a rough estimate of dates, and a title, usually referring to the type of record (such as salt injection reports or vacuum hearings). Most of the records have been stored and not called for in Central Records for years. Many of the boxes, especially the transfile boxes, are in poor condition. The origin, and in some cases the function, of the records is unknown. I reviewed the boxes for content during several visits to the agency. Titles given were taken from inventories provided by staff or derived from the records themselves. The reviews are filed following the scheduled records of the division they belong with.

Oil and Gas Division

Plats
Orders
Hearing files
Yates and Diamond "M" Unit files
Miscellaneous hearing files
Hearings - Panhandle
State Tender Board hearing
State-wide hearing summary
Survey of salt water disposal
Correspondence and reports
Correspondence, applications
Correspondence re: gas production
Correspondence re: East Texas Field
Reports of wells producing by artificial methods in the East Texas Field
Miscellaneous reports, East Texas Field
Oil and casinghead gas production reports, Panhandle Field
Panhandle reports
Oil and gas files, Rodessa field
Proration violation files
Master record of supplemental allowables
Salt water production worksheets and statistical reports
Injection reports
Miscellaneous oil and gas reports
Monthly operator reports, gas wells
Light and fuel commingling reports
Bottom hole pressure reports
Stock and refinery reports
Reports, various oil and gas topics
Tank bottom cleaning files
Vacuum hearing files
Gas potential test files
Refinery audit material
Air or gas lift forms

Oil and Gas Division or Gas Services Division

Pipeline hearings and miscellaneous data

Gas Services Division

Natural Gas Policy Act files
Pipeline correspondence re: oil losses
Pipeline tariff reports
Interstate Commerce Commission reports

Motor Transportation Division (these functions now handled by Dept. of Transportation)

Motor transportation transcripts
Cancelled or denied orders
Motor carrier dockets
Motor freight docket files

Railroad Commission (division unknown)

Arkansas-White-Red River Basin Studies

When reviewing the records retention schedule for this appraisal project, I noticed there were quite a large number of series without archival codes (A or R) that either had extremely long retention periods (50 or 100 years), or, because of their title or supposed content were series we should possibly review for archival value. Because there were so many of these series, my supervisor, Carolyn Foster, decided I should initially compile a preliminary appraisal report for these particular series to determine those to fully appraise.

I prepared a list of questions concerning series on the retention schedule we intended to review, both series with archival codes of R or A and those without archival codes, and mailed them on October 21, 1999 along with a letter of introduction to the chair of the Railroad Commission and the Records Management Officer. On November 22, 1999, I met with the agency's records administrator, Susan Cisco, to ask questions about specific records series and answer questions about the appraisal process. I talked with Susan about the best way to gather enough information about the series that did not carry archival codes of A or R to determine which of these series needed a full archival review. We decided to have meetings at the Railroad Commission with agency staff familiar with the records. At the meetings I would gather as much information as I could regarding the series we wished to review that did not carry archival codes and prepare the pre-appraisal report. Once that report was complete, I would contact Susan for additional information needed for the series we decided to review for the full report. At that point, Susan would begin gathering data needed to complete the records series reviews for series carrying archival codes of A or R.

Susan set up meetings with staff in each division. Meetings were held at the Railroad Commission on December 17, 1999; and January 5, 7, and 21, 2000. Staff members I met with were Jane Willis, Surface Mining and Reclamation Division; Elsa Bosque, Debbie Flados, Marty Barnes, Belinda Wolf, Tim Poe, Bob Meyer, and Jill Edwards, Oil and Gas Division; Terry Pardo, Maurice Curd, Angie Sambrano, Jackie Standard, and Shannon Miller, Gas Services Division (includes LP Gas staff); Ana Kirk and Mike Jones, Rail Division; and Gil Gilbert and Rene Gunter, Information Technology Services Division. Staff members interviewed only by phone were Linda James, Public Information Office; Diane Simmons, Oil and Gas Division; and Boyd Johnson, Office of the General Counsel. At these meetings (or through the phone interviews) I was be able to get information about what records were in the series, function, why some records had such a long retention, user demand, confidentiality, and other data I needed to help determine which series to fully appraise. Follow-up phone calls were made to several staff members in order to complete the series reviews. When gathering data for the A and R series, I contacted the above staff members for information about records in their divisions, as well as Connie Smith, Oil and Gas Division; Carrie Contreras, Public Information Office; Debra Ravel, Office of the General Counsel; and Gaye Dodd, Finance and Administration Division.

I also attended a meeting of the Records Coordinators of the Railroad Commission on January 21, 2000 at the request of Susan Cisco. I explained the scope of the appraisal project - its process and the goals - the advantages of transferring records to the Archives, our security environment, and how to access records held at the Archives.

I made several trips to the Railroad Commission to review old records housed in the Central Records area of the Oil and Gas Division, most of which are unscheduled records. Dates of the reviews were February 1 and 11, March 10, and July 7, 2000.

I also met with Elsa Bosque of the Oil and Gas Division and Debra Ravel of the Office of the General Counsel, on Friday, May 19, to discuss various questions they had about the records series reviews and agency wide records. We also talked about records held by the Commissioners. They stated the Commissioners generally do not keep original records in their offices; except for some correspondence, they hold only convenience copies of materials needed for their work. This explains the small number of series reported for the commissioners' offices.

I talked with Susan Cisco and Central Records staff regarding the microfilming operations of the agency. I was told that filming done prior to about 1982 was not necessarily done to ANSI (American National Standards Institute) standards. In at least one series, Rule 37 files, staff are keeping some of the paper records along with the microfilm because of the poor legibility of the microfilm (the font is too small to read easily). Because of the concerns over the older microfilming operations, we will be requesting the paper records of the series appraised as archival when paper copies still exist. If only microfilm is present, the older film (filmed prior to 1982) will need to be checked for legibility and record completeness prior to transferring this film to the Archives. Since 1982, the RRC has performed quality control checks, including checking the filmed image against the original for legibility and checking to see if any items were missed. They use silver halide film. Master copies of the microfilm or microfiche are kept offsite at the State Records Center, a duplicate copy is kept at the Railroad Commission.

There are many series of records where files are maintained in both the main RRC office in Austin and in the appropriate district office. Unless otherwise noted, the record copy of the files is in the main RRC office in Austin.

Archives Holdings

Administrative:

Minutes, 1891-1972, 13.48 linear ft.
These are minute books documenting the meetings of the Railroad Commission, dating 1891-1972.

Docket book, 1891-1898, 0.22 cubic ft.
The docket book lists forty formal complaints concerning railroad service or tariffs received by the Commission from citizens between 1891-1898.

Minutes, 1979-1989, 4 cubic ft.
Minutes of the Railroad Commission, dating 1979-1989.

Commissioner's records, Allison Mayfield, 1898-1922, 0.5 cubic ft.
This series contains three letterpress books of outgoing correspondence, dating 1898-1922. Most of the letters in the first two books are personal or business correspondence, dating 1898-1908. The third volume concentrates on Mayfield's efforts at reelection to the Commission in 1916 and 1922.

Commissioner's records, Ernest O. Thompson, 1933-1961, 8.25 linear ft.
Records present include correspondence, speeches, press releases, clippings, articles and reprints, and pamphlets. The files are dated 1933-1961. The records especially document Thompson's role as Commission spokesman on oil and gas conservation.

Railroads/Transportation:

Annual reports of railroad companies, 1859-1867, 1873-1885, 1890-1996, 380.24 ft.
These are annual reports of railroad companies. Dates covered are 1859-1867, 1873-1885, 1890-1996. Railroad companies operating in the State of Texas were required by law to prepare annual reports concerning their activities beginning in 1853. Legislation approved February 7, 1853, entitled, "An Act to Regulate Railroad Companies," designated the Comptroller of Public Accounts as the receiver of such reports. Railroad companies continued to file annual reports with the Comptroller until 1894. The act creating the Railroad Commission in 1891 gave the Commission authority to elicit information in the form of a report. Comprehensive annual reports encompassing a wide range of subjects were soon required of all companies operating lines within the State. The first reports filed with the Railroad Commission, known as the Circular Number 22 reports, were filed in 1891.

Each report provides the company's organization, operation, and financial condition. Data present may include the names of officers, directors, and stockholders; incorporation and organizational structure; capital stock; funded debt; property owned or leased; cost of road, equipment, and permanent improvements; operating expenses; income account; stocks and bonds owned; earnings from operations; rentals received; employees and salaries; number of passengers; amount of freight transported; mileage of track operated; and injuries to persons or other accidents. Most of the reports cover the company's operations for the calendar year. A few of the earlier reports cover partial year operations.

Express companies annual reports, 1908-1949, 7 cubic ft. (part of Annual reports, 1908-1949, 1968-1978, that also contains reports of railroad companies)
These are annual reports express companies were required to submit to the Railroad Commission, dating 1908-1949. The reports discuss the company's organization, operation, and financial condition. Other data present may include names of officers and directors, incorporation data, capital stock, funded debt, property owned or leased, employees and salaries, number of passengers, amount of freight transported, mileage of track operated, and injuries to persons or other accidents.

Incoming correspondence, 1891-1942, 54 linear ft.
This is incoming correspondence to the Railroad Commission, covering the period 1891-1942. Types of materials present include letters, telegrams, petitions, clippings, circulars, tariffs, and printed memorabilia. The predominant topic throughout is railroad freight rates. Correspondents include businesses, railroad companies, government offices, and the general public.

Outgoing correspondence, 1891-1934, 43 cubic ft.
This series consists of 225 letterpress volumes of outgoing letters of the Railroad Commission, dating 1891-1934. Topics frequently dealt with were requests for better passenger service, complaints about shipping problems and high rates on freight shipments, and questions about annual reports of railroad companies. Correspondents include businesses, railroad companies, and the general public.

Correspondence and reports, 1888-1948, 8.7 cubic ft.
This series consists of general correspondence of the Railroad Commission, dating 1888-1948, primarily between 1894 and the mid-1930s. Most letters are between the Railroad Commission and officials of various railroad companies (directors, engineers, and others). Topics covered include registering and issuing bonds, extensions of track and other construction, property valuations, and the consolidation or merger of railroad companies. Many of the older documents (pre-1920s) are copies used as documentation in applications of one kind or another.

Tariffs, 1890-1929, 4 linear ft.
This series consists of tariffs issued by the Railroad Commission, dating 1890-1929. Tariffs are publications of rates, rules, and regulations concerning common carriers, in this case, railroads. These tariffs concern freight rates.

Rate hearing #1573, 1915, 2 linear ft.
These are bound transcripts of railroad rate hearings held by the Railroad Commission in 1915. The hearings were held to determine if a statewide increase in shipping rates for freight was necessary.

"Doubleheader" hearing, ca. 1900, 5 linear inches
The records consist of a transcript of a Railroad Commission hearing held to consider the safety of "doubleheaders," i.e., trains running with two engines. The transcript is undated, likely ca. 1900, and consists entirely of testimony.

Interstate Commerce Commission financial dockets, 1920-1952, 33.84 cubic ft.
These records consist of ICC finance docket files concerning applications for certificates of public convenience and necessity, dating 1920-1952. Subjects of the dockets include construction of new lines, extension of lines, acquisition of lines, abandonment of lines and/or operations, consolidation of railroad companies, recapture proceedings of excess income, extension of liens and mortgages, issuing and selling stocks and bonds, loans through the revolving track fund, etc. Most railway lines operating in Texas during this time period (1920-1952) are represented. Types of materials found within these files include applications; briefs, exhibits, questionnaires, and other items gathered for or presented during the hearing; and the report of the ICC on the outcome of the railroad company's application.

Interstate Commerce Commission valuation reports, 1926-1927, 0.57 cubic ft.
These are construction valuation reports of two railroad branch lines built by the Panhandle and Santa Fe Railroad in 1926 and 1927.

Special authority orders, 1894-1935, 12.22 cubic ft.
These records consist of the Special Authority Orders issued by the Railroad Commission (usually printed, some typed), correspondence between the Railroad Commission and railroad companies concerning requested changes, and internal memos discussing the requested changes. Dates covered are 1894-1935. Most railway lines operating in Texas during this time period are represented.

Application files, 1891-1971, 15.05 cubic ft.
Records in this series consist of correspondence, telegrams, authority orders, tariffs, circulars, notes, and wrappers, dating 1891-1971. These are application files containing requests for special freight and passenger rates and the Railroad Commission's responses.

Motor Transportation Division:

Correspondence, 1929-1954, 11.3 linear ft.
This series contains incoming and outgoing correspondence of the Motor Transportation Division, concerning commercial operators who applied for or were granted permits or certificates of convenience to operate for hire on public highways. Dates covered are 1929-1954. The outgoing correspondence is limited, and is usually a notice of cancellation.

Transcripts of application hearings, 1930-1956, 33 linear ft.
This series contains transcripts of testimony at hearings held by the Motor Transportation Division to determine if certificates should be granted to allow applicants to operate commercial vehicles on public highways. Dates covered are 1930-1956.

Enforcement and regulation records, 1929-1955, 19 linear ft.
These are inspection reports of motor carrier's certificates, inspections of railroad crossing warning equipment, valuation reports of the equipment of a carrier, monthly revenue and expense reports of carriers, reports on amount of driving during a month, and reports of railroad accidents. Dates covered are 1929-1955.

Oil and Gas Division:

Correspondence and reports, 1919-1935, 61.25 linear ft.
This series contains incoming and outgoing correspondence of the Oil and Gas Division, dating 1919-1935. The incoming letters are from the public and the division's field agents. It includes reports on inspection activities, enforcement of oil and conservation laws, and inquiries. The outgoing letters respond to public inquiries and give instructions to field agents.

Original orders, 1928-1977, 49 linear ft.
Records present in this series include notices of hearings, original orders, and special emergency rules, dating 1928-1977. Original orders were issued by the Oil and Gas Division to govern the drilling of oil and gas wells and the operation of the fields.

Rule 37 cases (also titled Special permits and rule 37 case files), 1926-1936, 95 cubic ft.
Records present in this series include special permits, correspondence, plat maps, transcripts from hearings, legal documents, and the permit order if the application was granted. Dates of the files are 1926-1936. Special permits are issued by the Oil and Gas Division as exceptions to the Division's drilling rules. The majority of the permits are exceptions to the minimum spacing requirements of Rule 37.

State Tender Board, transcripts of testimony, 1939-1943, 1.25 linear ft.
Records present in this series consist of transcripts of testimony at hearings held by the State Tender Board to monitor the movement of oil in Texas. Dates covered are 1939-1943.

Miscellaneous, 1932-1933, 1940, 1947, 5 linear inches
These records consist of oil production statistics compiled by the Oil Accounting and Statistical Department in 1932-1933 for the East Texas Field and, in April 1940, for the entire state. Also present is testimony from a 1947 hearing on salt water disposal, and a 1947 speech by the chairman of the Interstate Oil Compact Commission on its history and functions.

Gas Utilities Division:

Docket case files, 1920-1973, 25 microfilm reels
This series contains records of hearings held by the Gas Utilities Division to consider the rate and service requests from natural gas utilities or their consumers, dating 1920-1973. Types of materials present in the case files include correspondence, petitions and appeals, rate applications, notices of hearings, and transcripts of the hearings that include legal briefs, testimony, exhibits, and actions taken by the Commission.

Director's general correspondence, 1935-1979, 5 microfilm reels
These records consist of correspondence and research files of several directors of the Gas Utilities Division, dating 1935-1979, most from the 1970s. Correspondents include government officials, public utilities, energy companies, and the general public. Topics concern natural gas rates, deregulation, and other energy-related matters.

Annual reports of utilities, 1920-1995, 239 microfilm reels
These are annual reports of gas utility companies, dating 1920-1995. These companies are required to submit an annual report to the Railroad Commission showing the names of officers and stockholders, detailed financial data, and an account of natural gas operations during the year.

Special orders, 1952-1974, 4 microfilm reels
This series contains petitions, correspondence, memos, city ordinances, contracts, exhibits, natural gas rate schedules, and the special order if granted. Dates covered are 1952-1974. Special orders are issued by the Gas Utilities Division in response to a petition from a natural gas utility to make a rate adjustment or service change for its rural customers.

Audit files, 1974-1979, 8 microfilm reels
These files contain gross receipts tax forms, audit field forms, and correspondence. Dates covered are 1974-1979. Field audits of gas utilities are conducted to enforce the natural gas rates set by the Commission, to collect the gas utilities gross receipts tax, and to ensure utility compliance with all other statutory and regulatory requirements.

Permits screened, 1974-1979, 2 microfilm reels
This series consists of permit forms and correspondence, dating 1974-1979. The Gas Utilities Division screens an application to operate natural gas pipelines to determine if the operator is classified as a gas company or as a gas utility.

Safety affidavits and reports, 1971-1978, 4 microfilm reels
Records in this series include annual safety affidavits from pipeline companies that confirm compliance with all safety rules and regulations, federal Transportation Department annual reports for gas pipeline systems, disposition and acquisition totals for gas systems, reports on pipeline leaks and failures, and accident field investigation reports. Dates covered are 1971-1978. The Gas Utilities Division regulates safety standards for the natural gas pipeline systems in Texas by inspecting, investigating and reporting on potential or actual hazards.

Odorization reports, 1973-1978, 4 microfilm reels
This series contains correspondence and odorization reports, dating 1973-1978. Through regular tests and reports, the Gas Utilities Division enforces the Texas law requiring natural gas companies to odorize the gas with a malodorant.

Stockholders annual reports, 1963-1978, 3 microfilm reels
These reports are copies of annual printed statements sent out by utility companies to their stockholders, dating 1963-1978. Each report contains the names of officers and director of the utility and a great deal of financial information on recent operations of the utility.

Unprocessed records:

Historical railroad files, ca. 1890-ca. 1989 (bulk ca. 1950-ca. 1975), 5 cubic ft.

Miscellaneous photographs removed from Railroad Commission records, 1922, 1930, 1931, 1933, 1942, 1948, fractional cubic ft.

Railroad Commission Centennial Committee, Memorabilia, 1991, fractional cubic ft.

Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Company of Texas, analysis of traffic, revenue, expenses by stations, 1905, 0.13 cubic ft.

Railroad bonds, city of Sherman, 1890-1894, 0.1 cubic ft.

Passenger tax receipts, 1885-1905, 0.22 cubic ft.

Related records:

Correspondence and reports relating to railroads from the Comptroller's Office, 1842-1939, 9.4 cubic ft.
This series contains correspondence and reports of railroad companies, dating 1842-1939. The collection consists of materials removed from records of the Comptroller's Office, the Secretary of State, and the Governor's Office.

Texas Secretary of State, Railroad charters and related records, 1876-1988, 7.84 cubic ft.
These are charters and related documents filed with the Secretary of State from 1876 to 1988. Related records include amendments to charters, minutes, resolutions, deeds or sale or merger, and renewals or dissolution of railroad corporations.

James C. Langdon Papers, 1944-1979, 19.5 linear ft.
Records include correspondence, memos, addresses, reports, testimony, press releases, papers, and publications, dating 1944-1979. The majority of the files concern Langdon's time on the Railroad Commission, 1963-1977.

John H. Reagan Papers, 1846-1904, 12.5 linear inches
Records include correspondence, a letter press book, clippings, resolutions, and literary productions, dating 1846-1904.

Prints and Photographs Collection - There are several collections of historic photographs documenting railroads, including the Hornaday Collection and supplements, the Troendle Collection, and Texas Scenes Collection. Photographic collections documenting the oil and gas industry, fields, wells, etc., include the Hornaday Collection, the Alfred E. Menn Collection, Burkburnett oil field photographs, the James Orbeck Collection, Texas Cities Postcard Collection, the Picture Book of Texas Cities Collection, and the Department of Public Safety Collection. Dates of images in the collections are primarily the early to mid 20th century.

Previous Destructions

There have been three types of destruction requests submitted by the Railroad Commission - those for paper records that have fulfilled their retention period; those for paper records that have been microfilmed, with the microfilm remaining at the agency as the record copy; and one request to destroy microfiche of duplicate records. A detailed list of the destruction requests is available at the Archives and Information Services Division. No destruction requests have been submitted since March 5, 1998.

Project outcome

The appraisal of the agency's records is complete. Changes for the retention schedule of the Railroad Commission - primarily changing, adding, or removing archival codes - should be completed prior to the next recertification of the schedule. Archival records whose retention has expired can now be transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission at the agency's earliest convenience. Series containing records eligible for transfer are noted. Because of the concerns over the older microfilming operations, we are requesting the paper records of the series appraised as archival when paper copies still exist. If only microfilm is present, the older film (filmed prior to 1982) will need to be checked for legibility and record completeness prior to transferring it to the Archives. When transferring microfilm or microfiche to the Archives, send both the silver halide master and a diazo copy of the film or fiche. In several series, the RRC has said it may scan the records and keep the scanned images in place of the originals. If the records are scanned, it will be the responsibility of the Railroad Commission to comply with 13 Texas Administrative Code, Section 6.95 (b), on the Final Disposition of Electronic Records, as follows: "An electronic state record that is an archival record must be maintained by the agency through hardware and software migrations and upgrades as authentic evidence of the state's business in accessible and searchable form, except as otherwise determined by the state archivist."

Archival series - Series remaining as archival

The following five series on the schedule remain as archival:

Administrative records

A.004 - Legislative appropriations requests

A.016 - Minutes and agenda - Send copies of the minutes for 1973-1978 and 1990-1999, and copies of agenda through 1999 to the Archives and Information Services Division now. Future transfers can be sent annually or after each meeting.

A.022 - Organization charts - Publication of the charts in the strategic plan fulfills the archival requirement. Send copies of charts to the Archives and Information Services Division prior to 1992 if any are located. Detailed charts of divisions not found in the strategic plans can be sent annually to the Archives and Information Services Division.

Oil and Gas Division

A.011 - Executive orders - Add this series to the retention schedule in the section containing records of this division with an archival code of A and a retention period of US+5. Files that have fulfilled the retention period need to be transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division now, then yearly thereafter.

Surface Mining and Reclamation Division

A.011 - Executive orders - Add this series to the retention schedule in the section containing records of this division with an archival code of A and a retention period of US+5. Transfer files that have fulfilled their retention period to the Archives and Information Services Division now, then yearly thereafter.

Archival series - Archival review series

We have determined that eighteen of the archival review series have archival value. For all series, change the archival code to A on the schedule. Some of these series were originally listed on the retention schedule as agency-wide series. In those cases, the series needs to be added to the section of the schedule containing other records of the division involved. Also, in several cases where one series is in two formats - paper and microfilm - we recommend a single entry on the schedule. Instructions on schedule changes and transfers, when applicable, are provided for each series. For series containing microfilm of paper records, unless otherwise noted, transfer microfilm of the paper records only if the film is of archival quality and only if both a silver halide master and a diazo copy can be sent. Otherwise, transfer the paper files.

Commissioners' Offices

A.007 - Administrative correspondence - Add this series to the retention schedule in the section containing records of the Commissioners' Offices. The agency must review the documents eligible for transfer and issue a waiver of confidentiality when possible. Files through 1996 can be transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division. Future transfers should be yearly as the retention period of the correspondence is fulfilled. Mandatory restrictions within the files need to be noted in each occurrence.

A.038 - Speeches - Add this series to the retention schedule in the section containing records of the Commissioners' Offices. Transfer the speeches and records of each Commissioner to the Archives and Information Services Division when the retention period expires, that is, all speeches/records through 1998. If the agency decides to change the retention to the term of the Commissioner + 2 years, which is acceptable, transfer these materials two years after the Commissioner leaves office.

Executive Directors

A.007 - Administrative correspondence - Add this series to the retention schedule in the section containing records of the executive directors. The agency must review the documents eligible for transfer and issue a waiver of confidentiality when possible. Files through 1996 can be transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division. Future transfers should be yearly as the retention period of the correspondence is fulfilled. Mandatory restrictions within the files need to be noted in each occurrence.

Public Information Office

B-004 - News and/or press releases - Change the retention period to two years and transfer records dating through 1997 to the Archives. Future transfers can be yearly. Press releases present only on the agency's website will need to be printed and the paper copy transferred.

Oil and Gas Division

A.030 - Reports, annual or biennial (narrative) - Retain the archival code of A and the note in the Remarks column - that sending copies of the report to the Publications Depository Program fulfills the archival requirement. Change the series item number to 1.1.067. This series needs to be added to the Oil and Gas Division's section of the retention schedule.

A.024 - Agency rules, policies and procedures - Add this series to the retention schedule in the section containing records of this division with an archival code of A and this note in the Remarks column "Manuals and handbooks deposited in the Publications Depository Program of the Library and Archives Commission fulfill the archival requirement for this series." If the Oil and Gas Division produces similar manuals to those listed above that are not published and deposited in the Depository, it needs to send copies of those manuals to the Archives and Information Services Division.

A.023 - Plans and planning records - The Oil and Gas Division needs to create two series of planning records to be added to its section of records on the records retention schedule - one for capital purchases, one for other planning records of the division. The first series (for purchases) should be coded as non-archival, and possibly can fall under a non-planning series of records--check with records consultant). The planning records not related to capital purchases should have an archival code of A with a retention period of AC+3. Transfer archival planning records that have fulfilled their retention period to the Archives now, then yearly thereafter.

A.029 - Reports and studies - This series needs to be added to the Oil and Gas Division's section of the retention schedule. Add a note in the Remarks column of the schedule as follows: "Archival requirement is fulfilled by sending copies of the reports produced to the Publications Depository Program of the Library and Archives Commission."

Gas Utilities Division

A.007 - Administrative correspondence (RAP) - Add this series to the retention schedule in the section containing records of this division. As the correspondence fulfills its retention period, transfer to the Archives and Information Services Division.

5.085 (paper) and 5.086 (microfilm) - Annual financial reports (gas utility companies) - Continue to transfer microfilm to the Archives. The RRC should include a use copy as well as a master reel.

Surface Mining and Reclamation Division

A.007 - Administrative correspondence - Add this series to the retention schedule in the section containing records of this division. Files dating 1978-1996 should be transferred to the Archives at the agency's earliest convenience.

A.029 - Reports and studies (non-fiscal) - Add this series to the retention schedule in the section containing records of this division. Transfer all reports in the series to the Archives and Information Services Division. The RRC needs to reevaluate the series item classification for the reports as they appear to concern policies and program directives for industry, thus making 1.1.025 a more appropriate series item designation.

7.003 (paper) and 7.004 (microfilm) - Abandoned mine lands files - We recommend the agency list these series as one on the retention schedule with a note in the Remarks section - "Original paper record retained until project completion. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed." Transfer files through 1989 to the Archives and Information Services Division now as they have met their retention period. Future transfers can be yearly as the files fulfill their retention period.

7.006 (paper) and 7.006.1 (microfilm) - Coal mining permit applications, issued - We recommend listing these two series as one on the retention schedule with a note in the Remarks section as follows - "Original paper record is retained until the mine is reclaimed and released. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed." Transfer files when they have fulfilled their retention period to the Archives and Information Services Division.

7.007 (paper) and 7.008 (microfilm) - Coal mining permit files - We recommend listing these two series as one on the retention schedule with a note in the Remarks section as follows - "Original paper record is maintained for a minimum of 5 years. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed." Transfer files when they have fulfilled their retention period to the Archives and Information Services Division.

7.027 (paper) and 7.028 (microfilm) - Mining Statistics Reports (annual) - We recommend listing these two series as one on the retention schedule with a note in the Remarks section as follows - "Original paper record is maintained for a minimum of 3 years. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed." Transfer files through 1984 as the files have fulfilled their retention period (3+13 years) to the Archives and Information Services Division now, then yearly thereafter.

7.033 (paper) and 7.033.1 (microfilm) - Uranium mining permit applications - We recommend listing these two series as one on the retention schedule with a note in the Remarks section as follows - "Original paper record is maintained until mine is reclaimed and released. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed." Transfer files when they have fulfilled their retention period to the Archives and Information Services Division.

7.034 (paper) and 7.035 (microfilm) - Uranium mining permit files - We recommend listing these two series as one on the retention schedule with a note in the Remarks section as follows - "Original paper record is maintained for a minimum of 3 years. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed." Transfer files when they have fulfilled their retention period to the Archives and Information Services Division.

Archival series - Series without archival codes

There were twenty-five series on the schedule not initially designated for archival review that were reviewed and determined to be archival. An archival code of A needs to be added to the schedule for each of these series. Instructions on schedule changes and transfers, when applicable, are provided for each series. For series containing microfilm of paper records, unless otherwise noted, transfer microfilm of the paper records only if the film is of archival quality and only if both a silver halide master and a diazo copy can be sent. Otherwise, transfer the paper files.

Administrative records

A.078.1 - Annual financial report - Add a note in the Remarks column "Archival requirement will be met by sending copies of the report to the Publications Depository Program of the Library and Archives Commission."

Oil and Gas Division

4.006 (paper) and 4.007 (microfilm) - Notices and orders - Change the retention period for series 4.006 from PM to AV, and add a note in the Remarks column - "Records will be transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission after microfilming." Transfer microfilm of records from 1977-1998 only if the film is of archival quality and only if both a silver halide master and a diazo copy can be sent now. Otherwise, transfer the paper files. Future transfers can be done after the records are microfilmed. There are also several transfiles of older orders, dating ca. 1932-1951 that have not been filmed yet, according to the agency. Once they are filmed, transfer a copy of the film to the Archives. If the agency decides not to film the old files, transfer the paper records to the Archives.

4.009 (paper) and 4.010 (microfilm) - Rule 37 hearings - Change the retention period for series 4.009 from PM to AV, and add a note in the Remarks column - "Records will be transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission after microfilming." Transfer microfilm of the paper records from 1937-present only if the film is of archival quality and only if both a silver halide master and a diazo copy can be sent. Otherwise, transfer the paper files. Future transfers can be yearly as the files are microfilmed. Transfer film of the old files from 1921 to 1924 to the Archives and Information Services Division as soon as the microfilming is completed. If the RRC decides not to film the old files, transfer those paper records to the Archives.

4.011 (paper) and 4.012 (microfilm) - Hearing files - Change the retention period for series 4.011 from PM to AV. Transfer files that no longer have administrative value to the agency (if any at this point) to the Archives and Information Services Division now; future transfers can be yearly as the files fulfill their retention period.

4.014 - Wildcat and suspense files - We recommend a shorter retention period, perhaps keeping the files AC+50, then transferring the files to the Archives. There are currently no records eligible for transfer in this series.

4.015 - Oil and gas potential files - The RRC feels it needs to keep the records in-house 100 years; we recommend a shorter retention period, perhaps keeping the records 50 years at the agency, then transferring film of the records to the Archives. If the RRC shortens the retention period as recommended, it can transfer film of the records through 1950 to the Archives.

4.017 - Oil and gas production reports - The RRC feels it needs to keep the records in-house 100 years; we recommend a shorter retention period, perhaps keeping the records 50 years at the agency, then transferring film of the records to the Archives. If the RRC shortens the retention period as recommended, it can transfer film of the records through 1950 to the Archives.

4.022 - Maps: paper - When the agency has completed adding data from the maps to the GIS and ceased to have regular use of the maps, transfer them to the Archives and Information Services Division.

4.028 - ST-1: Application for Texas severance tax incentive certification - The agency has suggested shortening the retention period to 50 years. We agree. When the retention period of these records has been met transfer them to the Archives. No files are eligible for transfer to the Archives at this time.

4.030 - GC-1: Gas well capability - We recommend a shorter retention period, perhaps keeping the files 50 years at the agency, then transferring the files to the Archives. No files are eligible for transfer to the Archives at this time.

4.031 - H-8: Crude oil, gas wells, liquids, or associated products loss report - We recommend a shorter retention period, perhaps keeping the files 50 years at the agency, then transferring the files to the Archives. There are no files ready for transfer to the Archives at this time.

4.032 - Reports for market demand - We recommend a shorter retention period of 50 years at the agency, then transferring the files to the Archives. If the RRC shortens the retention period as recommended, it can transfer the files through 1950 to the Archives now, and make future transfers as the files fulfill their retention period.

4.050 - P-13: Application of landowner to condition an abandoned well for fresh water production - There are no files eligible for transfer at this time to the Archives.

4.072 - Reports, studies and surveys (raw data), fresh water, hazardous waste, gas plants - The RRC wants to keep these records for 100 years to monitor environmental problems. There are currently no files in the series eligible for transfer to the Archives.

4.078 - Water quality certifications and coastal management program consistency reviews - We recommend a shorter retention period, perhaps keeping the files 50 years at the agency, then transferring the files to the Archives. As this series began in 1997, there are no files ready for transfer to the Archives at this time.

4.085 - Abandoned site candidate - We recommend a shorter retention period, perhaps keeping the files 50 years at the agency, then transferring the files to the Archives. There are no files ready for transfer to the Archives at this time.

4.088 - Operator/responsible party cleanup files - We recommend a shorter retention period, perhaps keeping the files 50 years at the agency, then transferring the files to the Archives. There are no files ready for transfer to the Archives at this time.

4.089 - Organization report - We recommend a shorter retention period, perhaps keeping the files 50 years at the agency, then transferring the files to the Archives. As this series began in 1985, there are no files ready for transfer to the Archives at this time

4.111 - Wells plugged with state funds - The RRC wants to keep these records for 100 years to monitor environmental problems. There are currently no files in the series eligible for transfer to the Archives.

4.115 - Complaint files/pollution: water well contamination - Although the RRC has stated it wants to change the retention to permanent, a PM retention at the agency is not advisable. A long retention at the agency, say 50 years after a cleanup is completed, is acceptable. The records then need to be transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division. There are currently no files in the series eligible for transfer to the Archives.

4.118 - D-Forms (Pollution/water well contamination) - Although the RRC has stated it wants to change the retention to permanent, a PM retention at the agency is not advisable. A long retention at the agency, say 50 years after a cleanup is completed, is acceptable. The records then need to be transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division. There are currently no files in the series eligible for transfer to the Archives.

Gas Utilities Division

5.073 - Digital data pipeline map files - electronic - We are not currently accepting electronic records at the Library and Archives Commission. At some point in the future if we begin to accept such files, we will apprise the RRC on the steps necessary to migrate the system and the data to the Archives. For now, the RRC needs to comply with 13 Texas Administrative Code, Section 6.95 (b), on the Final Disposition of Electronic Records, as follows: "An electronic state record that is an archival record must be maintained by the agency through hardware and software migrations and upgrades as authentic evidence of the state's business in accessible and searchable form, except as otherwise determined by the state archivist." It also needs to keep the metadata and data dictionaries current. A copy of the database should be made regularly to document the data as it existed. We wish to receive a set of county pipeline maps (on paper) now and possibly every 10 years thereafter so we can document where the pipelines ran. When we receive the pipeline map source data, we may continue to request a set of paper maps every ten years, or may decide not to. That determination will be made at a later time.

5.074 - Pipeline map source data - When the maps no longer have administrative value at the agency, transfer them to the Archives and Information Services Division.

5.090 - Litigation files (gas utilities dockets) - Add a note in the Remarks section of the schedule - "Original paper record is maintained for a minimum of one year after closure of the case. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed." Continue to transfer the microfilm to the Archives and Information Services Division, sending both a master and a use copy.

Surface Mining and Reclamation Division

7.016 (paper) and 7.017 (microfilm) - Lands unsuitable petitions - These two series should be listed as one on the retention schedule with a note in the Remarks section as follows - "Original paper record is retained until litigation is ended. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed." None of the records in the series have fulfilled their retention period so no transfers are expected at this time. When the retention period is met, transfer files to the Archives and Information Services Division.

Archival series - Current unscheduled records to add to the schedule

There are four series of current unscheduled records that have been appraised as archival and need to be added to the retention schedule with an archival code of A.

Administrative records

Strategic plans - Add a note in the Remarks column "Archival requirement will be met by sending copies of the report to the Publications Depository Program of the Library and Archives Commission."

Oil and Gas Division

Geographic Information System, oil and gas map layer - We are not currently accepting electronic records at the Library and Archives Commission. At some point in the future if we begin to accept such files, we will apprise the RRC on the steps necessary to migrate the system and the data to the Archives. For now, the RRC needs to comply with 13 Texas Administrative Code, Section 6.95 (b), on the Final Disposition of Electronic Records, as follows: "An electronic state record that is an archival record must be maintained by the agency through hardware and software migrations and upgrades as authentic evidence of the state's business in accessible and searchable form, except as otherwise determined by the state archivist." It also needs to keep the metadata and data dictionaries current. A copy of the database should be made regularly to document the data as it existed. When all of the well locations from the old maps have been added to the GIS, we wish to receive a set of county maps showing the well locations and related data.

Rail Division

Geographic Information System, rail maps layer - We are not currently accepting electronic records at the Library and Archives Commission. At some point in the future if we begin to accept such files, we will apprise the RRC on the steps necessary to migrate the system and the data to the Archives. For now, the RRC needs to comply with 13 Texas Administrative Code, Section 6.95 (b), on the Final Disposition of Electronic Records, as follows: "An electronic state record that is an archival record must be maintained by the agency through hardware and software migrations and upgrades as authentic evidence of the state's business in accessible and searchable form, except as otherwise determined by the state archivist." It also needs to keep the metadata and data dictionaries current. A copy of the database should be made regularly to document the data as it existed. We request a paper copy of rail maps within the GIS, either on the county or state level, showing rail lines and owners now and every ten years thereafter.

Annual reports, railroad companies - Continue to transfer reports to the Archives and Information Services Division as their retention period is fulfilled.

Archival series - Old unscheduled records, most to transfer to Archives

There are twenty series of old unscheduled records that have been appraised as archival. They need to be transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division unless otherwise noted. Archives staff will assist staff in Central Records with the transfers. Because of the poor condition of many of the boxes, especially the transfiles, some materials will need to be reboxed. Contact the appraisal archivist, Laura Saegert (463-5500), when these files are ready to be transferred.

General administrative records (division unknown)

Arkansas-White-Red River Basin studies

Oil and Gas Division

Plats
Orders - The RRC may wish to microfilm the orders first. If so, transfer to the Archives after filming is completed.
Hearing files re: exception to Statewide Rule 21
Hearing files - Yates and Diamond "M" Unit
Miscellaneous hearing files
Hearings, Panhandle Field

If the RRC wishes to retain these four series of hearings with the rest of the series Hearing files (4.011, 4,012), they can be transferred with those files when they cease to have administrative value. Or these series can be transferred now to the Archives.

Statewide hearing summary
Survey of salt water disposal
Correspondence and reports
Correspondence re: East Texas Field
Panhandle reports
Oil and gas files, Rodessa Field
Monthly operator reports, gas wells
Vacuum hearing files

Oil and Gas Division or Gas Services Division

Pipeline hearings and miscellaneous data - These hearing files belong with one of two series of hearing files, either with the Oil and Gas Division (O&G) or the Gas Services Division (GSD). The RRC needs to review the files to determine the correct series. If they are determined to belong to the GSD series Gas utilities docket transcripts/exhibits, then the files can be discarded as their retention period has expired. If they are determined to belong to the O&G Division's series Hearing files, they will need to be added to that series and transferred to the Archives when they cease to have administrative value.

Motor Transportation Division

Motor transportation transcripts
Motor carrier dockets
Motor freight docket files

Rail Division

Rail tariff files - Transfer the following sets of tariffs to the Archives - Railroad freight circulars, ca. 1901-1984; the Texas lines tariffs, ca. 1913-ca. 1932; the Texas/Louisiana lines routing circulars, 1937-1953; and the Western Classification tariffs, 1918-1962.

Special situations - Archival decision deferred

There are twenty series with long-term value that the agency intends to maintain permanently. Because the Railroad Commission is keeping the records permanently, the Archives is not appraising these series at this time. If these functions should be discontinued in the future and the records no longer retained by the RRC or an agency performing these functions, the Archives will review these files for archival value. For each series, add an archival review code of R to the schedule and the following note in the Remarks column: "Records will be reviewed for archival value by the Library and Archives Commission if the Railroad Commission decides not to maintain the records permanently." Maintain the retention period of PM or change to PM.

4.037 - H-1: Application to inject fluid into a reservoir productive of oil or gas (denied)
4.042 - W-14: Application to dispose of oil and gas waste by injection into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas (denied)
4.044 - W-14: Application to dispose of oil and gas waste by injection into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas (cancelled)
4.052 - Commercial H-11: denied/cancelled
4.053 - Non-commercial H-11: denied/cancelled
4.057 - Commercial landfarming permits: denied/cancelled
4.058 - Non-commercial landfarming permits: denied/cancelled
4.068 - R-8: cancelled, denied, withdrawn and expired
4.070 - Discharge permits: cancelled, denied, withdrawn and expired
4.073 - Hazardous oil and gas waste generators
4.074 - Hauler permits and reports: microformat, expired/cancelled, 1967-1992
4.076 - Hauler permits and reports: expired/cancelled
4.077 - Hauler permits and reports: cancelled through enforcement
4.079 - H-4: Application to create, operate and maintain an underground hydrocarbon storage facility
4.081 - Brine mining permits
4.083 - Sonar surveys
4.107 - Seismic well files: non-permitted
4.108 - Cathodic wells

Surface Mining and Reclamation Division

7.040 (paper) and 7.041 (microfilm) - Quarry and pit "pit" files - We recommend listing these series of paper and microfilm records as one on the retention schedule with a note in the Remarks section as follows - "Original paper record is retained until the pit becomes inactive or is reclaimed. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed."

7.047 (paper) and 7.048 (microfilm) - Abandoned mine lands, South, East, West Texas inventory - We recommend listing these series of paper and microfilm records as one on the retention schedule with a note in the Remarks section as follows - "Original paper record is retained until the mine becomes inactive or is reclaimed. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed." We request copies of the three reports/inventories produced as a result of this survey be transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division at the agency's earliest convenience.

Non-archival series - Series carrying archival review codes

There are nineteen series coded for archival review appraised to be non-archival. For most series, replace the archival code of R with the archival exemption code of E. For a couple of series, removing the archival code of R is sufficient and is noted. Unless otherwise noted, add the following note to the Remarks column for this series - "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission, March 16, 2001." Some of these series were originally listed on the retention schedule as agency-wide series. In these cases, the series needs to be added to the section of the schedule containing other records of the division involved.

Office of the General Counsel

A.014 - Legal opinions and advice

Finance and Administration Division

A.007 - Correspondence, administrative - Add this series to the retention schedule in the section containing records of this division.

Public Information Office

B.003 - PIO news clips - This is not a series that requires the additional note in the Remarks column, so removing the archival code will be sufficient.

Oil and Gas Division

A.038 - Speeches and papers - Add this series to the retention schedule in the section containing records of this division.

A.023 - Plans and planning records - Add a series of planning records for capital purchases to retention schedule in the section containing records of this division.

A.026 - Publication development files - Add this series to the retention schedule in the section containing records of this division.

4.095 - Monthly summary of Texas Natural Gas - This is not a series that requires the additional note in the Remarks column, so removing the archival code will be sufficient.

Rail Division

A.007 - Administrative correspondence - Add this series to the retention schedule in the section containing records of this division.

5.019 - Railroad abandonments

Gas Utilities Division

A.038 - Speeches and papers - Add this series to the retention schedule in the section containing records of this division.

5.106 - Plans and planning records - This series contains the microfilmed records of the series Special project files, a series appraised as non-archival. We recommend the agency create one series for these records, titled Special project and planning records. It should carry the AC+10 retention code with a note in the Remarks section - "Original paper record is maintained for a minimum of one year after calendar year end. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed." This series will not have an archival code.

Surface Mining and Reclamation Division

A.026 - Publication development files - Add this series to the retention schedule in the section containing records of this division.

7.009 - Plans and planning records

7.010 (paper) and 7.011 (microfilm) - Correspondence - administrative (court cases) - We recommend listing these two series as one on the retention schedule with a note in the Remarks section as follows - "Original paper record is maintained for a minimum of 3 years. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed."

7.037 - Camp Swift Study - This was reviewed in the pre-appraisal report as non-archival. This series does not require the additional note in the Remarks column, so removing the archival code will be sufficient.

7.018 (paper) and 7.019 (microfilm) - Correspondence - SMRD rules files - We recommend listing these two series as one on the retention schedule with a note in the Remarks section as follows - "Original paper record is maintained for a minimum of 5 years. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed."

7.023 - SMRD rules and regulations - This could be combined with the series Correspondence - SMRD rules files.

7.026 - Interim SMRD rules

Information Technology Services Division

A.023 - Plans and planning records - Add to the retention schedule in the section containing records of this division.

Non-archival series - Series not carrying archival codes

The following forty-eight series without archival review codes have been determined to be non-archival. Since these series do not carry archival codes, no changes need to be made to the retention schedule, unless otherwise noted.

Oil and Gas Division

4.008 - Transcripts
4.013 - FERC filings
4.016 - Schedule reports
4.018 - Oil and gas status reports
4.029 - ST-2: Application for Texas individual 3-year inactive wellbore certification
4.033 - MD-1: Optional operator market demand forecast for gas well gas in prorated fields
4.035 - Plants/refinery reports
4.036 - P-18: Skim oil/condensate report
4.039 - H-1A: Injection well data for H-1 application (denied) - We recommend the H-1A attachments be filed with the denied H-1 application files and this series be removed from the schedule. If the agency wishes to retain the series separately, then the retention code needs to be changed to PM to match that of the H-1 application series.
4.041 - W-14: Application to dispose of oil and gas waste by injection into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas (active) - Change retention to AC.
4.045 - Exceptions to statewide rules 9 and 46
4.046 - H-5: Disposal injection well pressure test report
4.051 - H-11: Application for permit to maintain and use a pit (active) - Change retention to AC.
4.054 - Commercial H-11: returned/withdrawn
4.055 - Non-commercial H-11: returned/withdrawn
4.056 - Active landfarming permits - Change retention to AC.
4.059 - Commercial landfarming permits: returned/withdrawn
4.060 - Non-commercial landfarming permits: returned/withdrawn - Change retention to PM
4.061 - Stationary treatment facilities: active - Change retention to AC.
4.062 - Commercial stationary treatment facilities: denied/cancelled
4.063 - Non-commercial stationary treatment facilities: denied/cancelled
4.064 - Commercial stationary treatment facilities: returned/withdrawn
4.065 - Non-commercial stationary treatment facilities: returned/withdrawn - Change retention to PM
4.066 - Pit minor permits
4.067 - R-8/active: authority to discharge oil/gas wastes from a gas plant into various disposal sites - Change retention to AC.
4.069 - Discharge permits: active - Change retention to AC.
4.071 - Discharge minor permits
4/075 - Hauler permits and reports: active - Change retention to AC.
4.082 - Mechanical integrity tests
4.090 - W-1X: Application for future re-entry of inactive wellbore and 14(B)(2) extension permit
4.091 - Reclamation plant permits: active and inactive
4.093 - H-15: Test on an inactive well more than 25 years old, type B: mechanical integrity test
4.104 - H-9: Certificate of compliance statewide rule 36 (hydrogen sulfide)
4.113 - Closed administrative penalty cases

Gas Utilities Division

5.061 - Pipeline related: Accident files reports and associated documentation
5.063 - Annual reports, pipeline companies
5.071 - Special investigation files - hazardous liquids and natural gas pipelines
5.091 - Gas utilities docket transcripts/exhibits - The RRC was considering removing this series from the schedule and combining it with the litigation files series, 5.090. The RRC needs to maintain this series, 5.091, separately as the other series is archival and this series is not.
5.105 - Special project files - This series contains the paper records of the series Plans and planning records, a series appraised as non-archival. We recommend the agency create one series for these records, titled Special project and planning records. It should carry the AC+10 retention code with a note in the Remarks section - "Original paper record is maintained for a minimum of one year after calendar year end. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed." This series will not have an archival code.

Gas Utilities Division - Liquefied Petroleum Gas

6.001 (paper) and 6.002 (microfilm) - Dockets
6.003 - Docket files - transcripts/exhibits
6.004 - Docket files - exceptions (see note below)
6.005 - Docket files - exceptions (without dismissal orders) (see note below)
6.006 - Docket files - exceptions (with dismissal orders) - We suggest the agency consider maintaining two series of exceptions instead of three - exception files with dismissal orders and those without the orders, to manage both paper and microfilm formats within each series.

Surface Mining and Reclamation

7.005 - Abandoned mine lands planning files
7.042 (paper) and 7.043 (microfilm) - Quarry and pit administrative files - We recommend listing the series of paper and microfilm records as one on the retention schedule with a note in the Remarks section as follows - "Original paper record is maintained for a minimum of 10 years. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed."
7.044 - Quarry and pit database
7.049 - Abandoned mine lands, South, East, West Texas inventory (database)

Non-archival series - Series to add to the schedule

Office of the General Counsel

Administrative penalty cases - The closed case files are already on the schedule, see Closed administrative penalty cases. The active cases need to be added. They are not archival.

Non-archival series - Old unscheduled records

The following twenty-four series of unscheduled records have been determined to be non-archival. They will not be transferred to the Archives. In most cases, the series these records belong to is unknown or unclear. Unless otherwise noted, if the RRC wishes to destroy the records, a "Request for Authority to Dispose of State Records" (Form RMD 102) must be submitted and receive approval. If the agency decides to retain the described records, the series must be added to the agency's records retention schedule.

Oil and Gas Division

State Tender Board hearing
Correspondence, applications
Correspondence re: gas production
Reports of wells producing by artificial methods in the East Texas Field
Miscellaneous reports, East Texas Field
Oil and casinghead gas production reports, Panhandle Field
Proration violation files
Master record of supplemental allowables
Salt water production worksheets and statistical reports
Injection reports
Miscellaneous oil and gas reports
Light and fuel commingling reports
Bottom hole pressure reports
Stock and refinery reports
Reports, various oil and gas topics
Tank bottom cleaning files
Gas potential test files
Refinery audit material
Air or gas lift forms

Gas Services Division

Natural Gas Policy Act files
Pipeline correspondence re: oil losses
Pipeline tariff reports
Interstate Commerce Commission report

Motor Transportation Division

Cancelled or denied orders

Non-archival series - Series reviewed in pre-appraisal report only

The following twenty-one series were reviewed in the pre-appraisal report and were determined to have insufficient value to warrant further appraisal. They have been appraised to be non-archival. Since these series do not carry archival codes, no changes need to be made to the retention schedule.

Public Information Office

B.005 - Photographic file

Oil and Gas Division

4.020 - Tank cleaning and tank report
4.047 - H-10: Annual disposal/injection well monitoring report (microfilm)
4.048 - H-10: Annual disposal/injection well monitoring report (paper)
4.086 - Abandoned site cleanup
4.099 - Engineering miscellaneous filming
4.112 - Wells plugged with state funds: salvage

Rail Division

5.015 - Maps, territory, rail safety inspection

Gas Services Division

5.075 - Computer produced pipeline map output
5.081 - FERC filings (paper)
5.082 - FERC filings (microfilm)

Gas Services Division - LP Gas

6.021 - Master files: engineering database
6.022 - Engineering summary report
6.029 - Manufacturers data report for pressure vessels (paper)
6.030 - Manufacturers data report for pressure vessels (illegible) (paper)
6.031 - Manufacturers data report for pressure vessels (microfilm)
6.035 - Manufacturers storage container report of pressure vessel repair, modification, testing, and testing lab results (paper)
6.036 - Manufacturers storage container report of pressure vessel repair, modification, testing, and testing lab results (microfilm)

Surface Mining and Reclamation Division

7.006.2 - Coal mining permit applications, dismissed (paper)
7.006.3 - Coal mining permit applications, dismissed (microfilm)
7.015 - Office of Surface Mining administrative record

Series to remove from the retention schedule

Oil and Gas Division

4.019 - Maps and miscellaneous - Remove this series from the schedule as the maps are part of the series Oil and gas potential files (4.015). The microfilm needs to be added to series 4.015.

4.023 - Maps: microformat - Remove this series from the schedule as the maps are duplicates of items in the series Maps (paper) (4.022). The microfilm needs to be added to series 4.022.

4.087 - Coastal facility certification files - Since materials in the series are not the record copy (the record copy is maintained in the General Land Office), the agency intends to remove this series from the schedule during the next recertification.

Surface Mining and Reclamation Division

7.023 - SMRD rules and regulations - This series should be combined with the series Correspondence - SMRD rules files as both contain the same records.

Records Series Reviews

General agency records series are listed first, followed by records held in each division. Within each division, agency-wide series are listed first, followed by records on the schedule for each division, generally in the order they appear on the schedule, followed by unscheduled records, when applicable. Since many of the terms used in the record series reviews are unfamiliar to staff at the Archives, I have compiled a glossary, based on definitions found in the administrative rules of the Railroad Commission (16 TAC). The terms within are listed by division: Oil and Gas, Gas Utilities - Liquefied Petroleum Gas, and Surface Mining and Reclamation. The glossary is located at the end of the report, following the record series reviews.

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Record Series Reviews

Records Series Review
Series Title:
Legislative appropriation requests

Agency: Railroad Commission of Texas

Contact: Gaye Dodd, Finance and Administration Division, 463-7267

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes

Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:
Retained by the agency for six years after completion, according to the retention schedule. Actual holdings of the agency are 1996/97-[ongoing], fractional cubic feet. The records are housed in the Finance and Administration Division at agency headquarters.

Description:
These records are legislative appropriation requests of the Railroad Commission submitted to the Legislative Budget Board and others. The records date from 1969/70 to [ongoing]. The requests generally contain narrative statements of agency functions or programs. Program objectives are listed, along with a description of each objective, discussion of performance measures, statistics, program need indicators, and expenses--expended, current, and projected, at different funding levels.

Purpose:
Biennial budget requests are a mandatory requirement of the state budgetary process. These records request specific appropriations from the legislature and provide justification for the amounts requested.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

Arrangement: Reverse chronological order.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records:
Legislative Budget Board, Legislative Budget Estimates have been published since fiscal years 1954 and 1955. This publication, a compilation of data for all state agencies, summarizes the fiscal information found in agency-submitted budgets or appropriation requests, but omits most of the narrative.

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Legislative appropriation requests
Series item number: 1.1.004
Agency item number: A.004
Archival code: A
Retention: AC+6

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:
Archival requirement for this series is fulfilled by sending copies to the Publication Depository Program. Two copies of Requests for Legislative Appropriations must be sent to the Publications Depository Program (13 Texas Administrative Code, Section 3.4 (3)). The Texas Documents Collection holds 1969/70-2000/01.

Gaps: Earliest requests maintained at the agency are for 1996/97. No requests located prior to 1969/70.

Appraisal decision:
Legislative appropriation requests prepared by state agencies provide evidence of an agency's fiscal performance and needs. The requests are already considered to be archival. The archival requirement for these records is fulfilled by sending copies to the Publications Depository Program of the Library and Archives Commission. The Railroad Commission needs to continue sending reports to the Publications Depository Program.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Meeting agenda and minutes

Agency: Railroad Commission of Texas

Contact: Elsa Bosque, Oil and Gas Division, 463-6905

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: 4 microfilm rolls

Agency holdings:
Retained permanently by the agency according to the retention schedule. The Railroad Commission holds microfilm of minutes and agenda, dating 1973-1996. Files for 1996-[ongoing] are still maintained in paper at the RRC as they have not yet been filmed. Microfilm master is kept at the State Records Center. The paper records and a duplicate set of microfilm are maintained in the Central Records area of the Oil and Gas Division. There are several cubic feet of paper records and 143 rolls of microfilm at the agency.

Description:
These are the official minutes and agenda of the Railroad Commission. Dates of records at the agency are 1973-[ongoing], original minutes held at the State Archives cover 1891-1972, 1979-1989. Matters before the Commission documented in the minutes include contested cases, complaints on violated Commission rules (e.g. operator not in compliance with plugging rules), changes in policies and procedures, amendments to rules, resolution of complaints filed against the Commission, and other related matters concerning oil and gas regulation (production/permitting, oil field clean up, site remediation, compliance, etc.), gas utility regulation, liquefied petroleum gas and other gas services issues, pipelines, railroads, or surface mining and reclamation.

Purpose:
Minutes document actions taken by the Railroad Commission, agenda announce items to be discussed at upcoming meetings.

Agency program:
The Texas Railroad Commission was the first regulatory agency created in the State of Texas and originally had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. The legal focus was on intrastate passenger and freight activities. Interstate jurisdiction fell under the U.S. Interstate Commerce Commission. For the first twenty-five years of its existence, the Railroad Commission was largely concerned with regulating railroads, setting rates, receiving complaints, and making investigations. As other controversies arose where the Legislature deemed that the public interest could best be served by regulation, additional duties were assigned to the Railroad Commission.

The Railroad Commission's authority was broadened beginning in 1917 with the passage of the Pipeline Petroleum Law, Senate Bill 68, 35th Legislature, Regular Session, that declared pipelines to be common carriers like railroads and placed them under the Commission's jurisdiction. This was the first act to designate the Railroad Commission as the agency to administer conservation laws relating to oil and gas.

The Commission's regulatory and enforcement powers in oil and gas were increased by Senate Bill 350 of the 36th Legislature, Regular Session, the Oil and Gas Conservation Law, effective June 18, 1919. This act gave the Railroad Commission jurisdiction to regulate the production of oil and gas. Acting upon this legislation, the Commission adopted in 1919 the first statewide rules regulating the oil and gas industry to promote conservation and safety, including Rule 37. This rule requires minimum distances between wells at drilling sites in order to protect field pressure and correlative rights.

The Gas Utilities Act of 1920, House Bill 11, 36th Legislature, 3rd Called Session, gave the Commission regulatory and rate authority over individuals and businesses producing, transporting, or distributing natural gas in Texas. In 1937, following a large natural gas explosion in a school in New London, Texas, the 45th Legislature passed legislation giving the Railroad Commission the authority to adopt rules and regulations pertaining to the odorization of natural gas or liquefied petroleum gases (House Bill 1017, Regular Session). The passage of the Public Regulatory Act of 1975 (PURA), House Bill 819, 64th Legislature, Regular Session, required certain state regulatory agencies, including the Commission, to set the overall revenues of a utility based on its "cost of service."

Regulation of liquefied petroleum was added to the Commission's responsibilities in 1939 by House Bill 792, 46th Legislature, Regular Session. The legislation authorized the Commission to adopt and enforce safety rules and standards in the storage, handling, transportation, and odorization of butane or LP-gases. Regulation of compressed natural gas was added to the Railroad Commission's responsibilities in 1983 (Senate Bill 617, 68th Legislature, Regular Session).

The Motor Bus Law of 1927, House Bill 50, 40th Legislature, Regular Session, and the Motor Carrier Law of 1929, House Bill 654, 41st Legislature, Regular Session, extended the Commission's regulatory powers to commercial transportation of persons and property on state highways. In 1995, following federal deregulation of motor carriers, the 74th Legislature eliminated the agency's authority to regulate commercial carriers involved in intrastate transport and transferred the remaining responsibilities related to commercial carriers (motor carrier registration, insurance verification, and safety) to the Texas Department of Transportation (Senate Bill 971, Regular Session), and the Department of Public Safety (Senate Bill 3, Regular Session).

The Texas Surface Mining and Reclamation Act of 1975, Senate Bill 55, 64th Legislature, Regular Session, authorized the Commission to regulate the exploration for and surface mining of coal, lignite, and uranium within the state and to oversee the reclamation of lands disturbed by surface mining operations. In 1991, the 72nd Legislature, Regular Session, passed House Bill 451, the Texas Aggregate Quarry and Pit Safety Act, that authorized the Commission to regulate quarry and pit operations.

The Commission's authority over railroads diminished over the latter half of the twentieth century. The Federal Railroad Safety Act of 1970 vested rail safety responsibilities in the Federal Railroad Administration. In 1980, the Federal Staggers Rail Act largely eliminated the Commission's responsibility for setting rates for intrastate railroads. By 1984, the Commission ceased its role in the economic regulation of the Texas rail industry. Regulatory powers over rail safety were granted to the agency in 1985 when the 69th Legislature authorized the Commission to implement a rail safety program in conjunction with the Federal Railroad Administration Act of 1970 (Senate Bill 444, 69th Legislature, Regular Session).

The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

In 1999, the agency had approximately 848 FTE (full-time equivalent) employees. Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? None

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Minutes - several destruction requests were submitted between March 1686 and August 1997 to destroy paper records dating 1984-1995 after microfilming.

Publications based on records: None

Internet pages based on records:
Agendas for RRC meetings from August 1996-current and agenda and minutes from 1998-current are posted at http://www.rrc.state.tx.us/meetings-seminars/ms-commission-conferences/pcc.html

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Meeting agenda and minutes
Series item number: 1.1.058
Agency item number: A.016
Archival code: A
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:
Minutes, 1891-1972, 13.48 linear ft.
These are minute books documenting the meetings of the Railroad Commission, dating 1891-1972.

Minutes, 1979-1989, 4 cubic ft.
Minutes of the Railroad Commission, dating 1979-1989.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
Meeting minutes of agency boards and commissions provide the highest level documentation of the actions of the agencies they govern. These are already considered to be archival. The Railroad Commission has in the past sent copies of the minutes to the Library and Archives Commission, but has not send any minutes since 1989, and has never sent agendas. The agency needs to send copies of the minutes for 1973-1978 and 1990-1999, and copies of agenda through 1999 now. Future transfers of minutes and agenda can be sent annually or after each meeting. Transfer microfilm of the paper records only if the film is of archival quality and only if both a silver halide master and a diazo copy can be sent. Otherwise, transfer the paper files.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Organization charts

Agency: Railroad Commission of Texas

Contact: Elsa Bosque, Oil and Gas Division, 463-6905

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:
Retained by the agency until superseded. The archival requirement for this series is fulfilled by publishing the chart in the strategic plans of the RRC.

Description:
Organization charts illustrate graphically the administrative structure of the different functional units within the Railroad Commission. Dates covered are 1992-[ongoing]. Copies of the agency-wide organization charts are published in the strategic plans prepared by the agency, dating 1992, 1994, 1996, and 1998. The larger divisions maintain current copies of organizational charts of the divisions.

Purpose:
These charts illustrate graphically the administrative structure of the different functional units within an agency.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records:
These are published in the strategic plans of the RRC.

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Organization charts
Series item number: 1.1.023
Agency item number: A.022
Archival code: A
Retention: US

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:
The Publications Depository holds the strategic plans of the RRC for 1992, 1994, 1996, and 1998.

Gaps: Unknown - some divisions may have charts prior to those in the strategic plans (beginning 1992).

Appraisal decision:
Organization charts provide a graphic description of the administrative structure of the different functional units of the agency. These are already considered to be an archival record. Publication of the charts in the strategic plan fulfills the archival requirement. The agency needs to forward copies to the Archives and Information Services Division of organization charts prior to 1992 if any are located. Detailed charts of divisions not found in the strategic plans can be sent annually to the Archives and Information Services Division.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Annual financial report

Agency: Railroad Commission of Texas

Contact: Gaye Dodd, Finance and Administration Division, 463-7267

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: one report

Agency holdings:
Retained by the agency AC+ 6 years, according to the retention schedule. Actual holdings are 1993/94-1998/99, comprising fractional cubic feet. Reports are maintained in the Finance and Administration Division at agency headquarters.

Description:
Annual financial reports of the Railroad Commission, dating 1993/1994-1998/1999 are at the agency, 1977/1978-1985/1986, 1990/1991-1998/1999 in the Texas Documents Collection. The agency does not produce an annual narrative report, the financial report serves this purpose. It contains a brief narrative overview of the RRC functions, including an agency history and functions of each division, with some statistics present, such as the number of liquefied petroleum gas licenses issued or the number of miles of natural gas pipelines in operation. The majority of the information presented is statistical, providing fiscal information concerning the appropriations and expenditures of the agency. A general organization chart is also present, listing just the divisions. The Oil and Gas Division and the Gas Services Division produce annual narrative reports that provide greater detail about their activities. The annual division reports are sent to the Publications Depository of the Library and Archives Commission.

Purpose:
These reports provide summaries of the activities of the Railroad Commission for fiscal years.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

Arrangement: Reverse chronological order.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? None

Problems:
The agency considers the annual financial reports as their annual/biennial narrative report as well as the annual financial report, both series are on the schedule.

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Reports, annual and biennial
Series item number: 1.1.066
Agency item number: A.030
Archival code: A
Retention: AC+6

Title: Annual financial report
Series item number: 4.5.003
Agency item number: A.078.1
Archival code: none
Retention: AC+6

Archival holdings:
The Archives does not hold copies of any annual financial reports. It does hold copies of early annual reports of the RRC in the Texana collection, dating 1982-1929. Beginning in 1930, the reports cover just railroad and express company operations, not the whole agency.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:
The archival requirement for narrative annual/biennial reports is fulfilled by sending copies to the Publications Depository Program, Library and Archives Commission (13 Texas Administrative Code, Section 3.3 (a)(1) (A)). The Publications Depository has annual financial reports for 1977/78-1985/86, 1990/91-1998/99.

Gaps: Reports are missing from 1986/87 to 1989/90 and any created before 1977/78.

Appraisal decision:
The Railroad Commission has not produced an agency-wide annual or biennial narrative report since the 1930s. It does produce an agency-wide annual financial report. This report does contain a brief narrative summary of the activities of the agency over the fiscal year. Because an annual narrative report is not produced by the RRC, we have designated this annual financial report to be archival. It only needs to be listed once on the schedule, as the annual financial report, series A.078.1. Add an archival code of A to the retention schedule. Also, Add a note in the Remarks column of the schedule - "The archival requirement for this series is fulfilled by sending the required copies to the Publications Depository Program, Texas State Library and Archives Commission (13 Texas Administrative Code, Section 3.3 (a)(1) (A))."

Since this report is sent annually to the State Publications Depository, copies do not need to be sent to the Archives and Information Services Division.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Strategic plans

Agency: Railroad Commission of Texas

Contact: none

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:
The series is not currently on the schedule, so it does not have a set retention period. The agency has a copy of all plans prepared: 1992 (1992-1998), 1994 (1995-1999), 1996 (1997-2001), 1998 (1999-2003), and 2000 (2001-2005), fractional cubic feet.

Description:
Strategic plans are long-range planning tools prepared by the agency where the goals and objectives of the agency are presented along with performance measures for each. The Railroad Commission has prepared five plans, in 1992, 1994, 1996, 1998, 2000 with the planning time frames 1992-1998, 1995-1999, 1997-2001, 1999-2003, and 2001-2005 respectively. Plans contain a mission statement, a statement of philosophy, external/internal assessment of the agency, and the goals of the agency. Each goal contains objectives, strategies, and output measures for measuring and achieving the goals. Also present is an organization chart of the agency.

Purpose:
Strategic plans are long-range planning tools prepared by the agency to set forth goals and objectives of the agency over a multi-year period. The plans are prepared in accordance with V.T.C.A., Government Code, Sections 2054.095 and 2056.002.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Internet pages based on records:
The latest strategic plan for the agency is on the agency's web site, at http://www.rrc.state.tx.us/about/statplan07/2007-11strategicplan.pdf.

Series data from agency schedule: This is not on the schedule.
Suggested series data from state records schedule:
Title: Strategic plans
Series item number: 1.1.055
Agency item number: to be added
Archival code: A
Retention: AC+6

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:
The archival requirement for this series is fulfilled by sending the required number of copies to the Publications Depository Programs, Library and Archives Commission (12 Texas Administrative Code, Section 3.4(1) (C)). The Publications Depository holds the plans for 1992, 1994, 1996, and 1998.

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
The strategic plans document the long-range planning activities of the Commission and are already considered archival. Their archival mandate is fulfilled by the agency sending copies of the reports to the Publications Depository. This series needs to be added to the retention schedule, with an archival code of A, a retention of AC+6, and a note in the Remarks column - "Archival requirement is fulfilled by sending copies of the strategic plans to the Publications Depository Program of the Library and Archives Commission."

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Administrative correspondence

Agency: Railroad Commission of Texas
Commissioners' Offices and Executive Directors

Agency contact: Susan Cisco, 463-5623

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: 2.5 cubic feet (approximately 6 inches per Commissioner and Executive Director)

Agency holdings:
Retained by the agency for three years after the calendar year end. Dates covered are 1996-[ongoing], comprising about 10 cubic feet. Files are retained in the offices of the executive directors and the commissioners.

Description:
This series consists of incoming/outgoing and internal correspondence pertaining to the formulation, planning, implementation, interpretation, modification, redefinition of the programs, services, or projects of the agency and the administrative regulations, policies, and procedures that govern them. Dates covered are 1996-[ongoing]. Correspondents are the Commissioners and the executive directors within the Railroad Commission and outside parties.

Purpose:
To communicate and disseminate information between the Commissioners and the executive directors and with outside parties.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency. Currently, the agency has two division directors co-serving as executive directors.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

Arrangement: By topic, then date.

Access constraints:
Portions of information within this records series are excepted from public disclosure under one or more mandatory or discretionary exemptions under the Public Information (Open Records) Act, Chapter 552 of the Texas Government Code. Specifically, Sections 552.101, 552.102, 552.103, 552.107, and/or 552.111.

Use constraints: None outside of the access restrictions.

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems:
This is an agency-wide series. On the retention schedule five divisions/offices have administrative correspondence and each is described and appraised separately in this report. In this case, the series covers the correspondence of the executive directors and the commissioners, as opposed to administrative correspondence of the divisions described in the other series.

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None according to staff.

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Correspondence, Administrative
Series item number: 1.1.007
Agency item number: A.007
Archival code: R
Retention: CE+3

Archival holdings:
The Archives holds the records and/or papers of several RRC commissioners; there is some correspondence in these records relating to RRC activities.

Commissioner's records, Allison Mayfield, 1898-1922, 0.5 cubic ft.
This series contains three letterpress books of outgoing correspondence, dating 1898-1922. Most of the letters in the first two books are personal or business correspondence, dating 1898-1908. The third volume concentrates on Mayfield's efforts at reelection to the Commission in 1916 and 1922.

Commissioner's records, Ernest O. Thompson, 1933-1961, 8.25 linear ft.
Records present include correspondence, speeches, press releases, clippings, articles and reprints, and pamphlets. The files are dated 1933-1961. The records especially document Thompson's role as Commission spokesman on oil and gas conservation.

James C. Langdon Papers, 1944-1979, 19.5 linear ft.
Records include correspondence, memos, addresses, reports, testimony, press releases, papers, and publications, dating 1944-1979. The majority of the files concern Langdon's time on the Railroad Commission, 1963-1977.

John H. Reagan Papers, 1846-1904, 12.5 linear inches
Records include correspondence, a letter press book, clippings, resolutions, and literary productions, dating 1846-1904.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: No records are present at the agency prior to 1996. Please see statement under Archival holdings. These records may be earlier records in this series.

Appraisal decision:
This is the correspondence of the executive directors and the commissioners concerning the administration of the agency, its programs, policies, etc. The correspondence of these offices is the highest level produced by the agency and is important in documenting how the agency functions. This series has been appraised to be archival. This series needs to be added twice to the retention schedule, in the section containing records of the Commissioner's Offices and in the section containing records of the Executive directors. Each series will carry an archival code of A.

The agency must review the documents eligible for transfer and issue a waiver of confidentiality when possible. Files through 1996 can be transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division. Future transfers should be yearly as the retention period of the correspondence is fulfilled. Mandatory restrictions within the files need to be noted in each occurrence.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Speeches and papers

Agency: Railroad Commission of Texas
Commissioners' Offices

Contact: Susan Cisco, 463-5623

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: varies by Commissioner, generally fractional

Agency holdings:
Retained by the agency for two years according to the retention schedule. Agency holds one speech from Commissioner Garza, dated in the 1990s, fractional; speeches of Commissioner Matthews, dating 1995-[ongoing], comprising less than two cubic feet; and speeches for Commissioner Williams, dating 1999-[ongoing], size is fractional.

Description:
These are speeches made or papers presented by the Commissioners of the Railroad Commission on issues or topics related to the overall operation of the agency, dating ca. 1995-[ongoing].

Purpose:
Speeches provide both general and specific information about the functions of the agency to the public, usually focusing on current issues facing the industry.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

Arrangement:
For Commissioner Williams, speeches are denoted by engagement, e.g., Texas Certified Public Accountants speech is listed as "TCPA." Speeches may also be arranged by date, depending on the Commissioner.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems:
This is an agency-wide series. On the retention schedule three divisions/offices have speeches and each is described and appraised separately in this report.

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Speeches and papers
Series item number: 1.1.040
Agency item number: A.038
Archival code: R
Retention: 2

Archival holdings:
Commissioner's records, Ernest O. Thompson, 1933-1961, 8 linear ft., 3 inches
Records present include correspondence, speeches, press releases, clippings, articles and reprints, and pamphlets. The files are dated 1933-1961. The records especially document Thompson's role as Commission spokesman on oil and gas conservation.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None present at the agency prior to the current Commissioners in office, ca. 1995. Please see statement under Archival holdings. These records may hold earlier speeches in this series.

Appraisal decision:
These speeches and papers are given by the highest ranking officials of the Railroad Commission, the Commissioners. Actions of the Railroad Commission, especially in relation to the oil and gas industry, generate a great deal of interest with the general public. The speeches are a good summary source of contemporary concerns and regulatory issues affecting the oil and gas industry and other regulatory concerns of the Railroad Commission. The speeches and papers have been appraised to be archival. Add this series to the section of the retention schedule containing records of the Commissioner's Offices. Change the archival code to A. Transfer the speeches and papers of each Commissioner to the Archives and Information Services Division when their retention period has expired, which would be all speeches/papers through 1998 if the retention period remains as two years. If the agency decides to change the retention to that of the term of the Commissioner + 2 years, which is acceptable, then transfer these materials two years after the Commissioner leaves office.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Legal opinions and advice

Agency: Railroad Commission of Texas
Office of the General Counsel

Agency contact: Debra Ravel, Staff Attorney, 463-6932

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: Less than � inch

Agency holdings:
Retained in the Office of the General Counsel at agency headquarters. Dates of the files vary since the retention period is AV; it is likely the files go back to at least the 1980s. Volume is 163.5 inches (about 13.5 cubic feet).

Description:
This series includes legal opinions and advice from agency legal counsel or the Attorney General, including any requests from the Commissioners or staff eliciting the opinions or advice. Dates covered vary, likely are 1980s-[ongoing]. Based on the functions of the regulatory and support divisions within the Railroad Commission, formal legal memoranda and informal e-mails falling within this record series are, generally, fact specific and, accordingly, are of administrative value for a relatively short period of time. This series primarily comprises opinions and advice regarding contracts, procurement, and personnel matters. Occasionally, questions also arise regarding whether the Railroad Commission's jurisdiction covers particular facts presented.

Legal opinions and/or Public Information (Open Records) Act decisions by the Attorney General are retained by the Office of the Attorney General and are available to the public in paper format by request or in electronic format through the Attorney General's website.

Purpose:
Legal advice is sought to ensure that actions of the Commissioners, directors, and staff are in compliance with applicable state and/or federal statutes and court decisions.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Office of the General Counsel is the enforcement branch of the agency. It provides legal support through five sections: Enforcement, Gas Utilities and LP-Gas, General Law, Oil and Gas, and Surface Mining. The Enforcement Section handles enforcement cases for all the agency's regulatory areas and ensures the commissions' orders and rules are followed. The Gas Utilities and LP-Gas Section handle rate-setting cases for gas transportation and utility companies and safety compliance cases involving the natural gas, LP-gas, and compressed natural gas industries, as well as cases involving enforcement of the gas utility tax. The General Law Section provides legal research and advice to staff and serves as staff attorneys for complex hearings arising in other divisions. It also tracks proposed state regulations and reviews submissions to the Texas Register. The Oil and Gas Section holds hearings on matters dealing with producing, storing, transporting, reclaiming, and processing oil and gas. It also conducts hearings to determine responsibility for the proper plugging of abandoned wells and preventing and controlling oil and gas pollution. The Surface Mining Section reviews and processes applications for permits, revisions, renewals, variances, and bond releases. It also conducts rule-making hearings involving: surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; abandoned mine land reclamation; and safety of quarries and pits. It also holds hearings involving new and amended authority, rates, new or amended rules, and compliance with rules and statutes.

Arrangement:
The arrangement of information (primarily copies) falling within this record series in the General Counsel Division is discretionary with the involved supervisor. Most of this information is retained by either the staff attorney who authored the memorandum or his or her supervisor. The original records are generally retained in project files in the office of the Commissioner, director, or staff member who requested the legal advice or opinion.

Access constraints:
Portions of information within this records series are excepted from public disclosure under one or more mandatory or discretionary exemptions under the Public Information (Open Records) Act, Chapter 552 of the Texas Government Code. Specifically, Sections 552.101, 552.102, 552.103, 552.107, and/or 552.111.

Use constraints:
Portions of information within this records series are disclosed only to the Commissioner's Office, director, or staff member who requested the legal advice or opinion and are segregated from public files because the advice or opinion contained in the memorandum or e-mail falls within one or more mandatory or discretionary exemptions to disclosure, as described above, under "Access constraints."

Access to this information is determined on a case-by-case basis. A request for access to information within this records series by a member of the public should be made to Debra Ravel, General Law Section, Office of General Counsel Division; phone: 512-463-6932; fax: 512-463-6684; e-mail address: debra.ravel@rrc.state.tx.us.

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:
The Railroad Commission has, occasionally, requested a legal opinion or Public Information (Open Records) Act decision from the Attorney General. Accordingly, related records can also be found at the Office of the Attorney General.

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None according to staff.

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Legal Opinions and Advice
Series item number: 1.1.014
Agency item number: A.014
Archival code: R
Retention: AV

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
These records are legal opinions and advice of the RRC legal counsel or the Attorney General. The majority of the files concern procurement, contracts, and personnel matters. A few concern whether or not the RRC has jurisdiction over particular issues. These files are primarily copies, the original residing in the project files of the Commissioner or staff member requesting the opinion. While these items have value to the agency, staff said the records have short-lived administrative value. Significant opinions/advice can be found within the project files they pertain to, or case files if any involved litigation. Because these are primarily copies and mostly concern general administrative matters, this series has been appraised to be non-archival. Replace the archival code of R with an E and add the following note to the Remarks column for this series - "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission, March 16, 2001."

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
News and/or press releases

Agency: Railroad Commission of Texas
Public Information Office

Contact: Carrie Contreras, 463-2715

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:
Original paper record is retained for one year then microfilmed. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed. Current paper holdings are December 1, 1999-[ongoing]. Microfilm files date 1997-1999. Press releases on the agency's website are dated 1995-[ongoing]. The series has a retention period of 100 years. Files comprise less than one cubic foot. Microfilm master is maintained at the State Records Center. Paper records and a duplicate set of microfilm are maintained in the Public Information Office at agency headquarters.

Description:
These are news releases, speeches, statements, special reports, etc., dating 1995-[ongoing]. These items are prepared by the Public Information Office of the Railroad Commission at the request of an individual commissioner or prepared in the commissioner's office and released upon the instruction of the Commission. These materials cover the full range of commission activities, with most concerning the oil and gas industry. Press releases can be found on the website of the agency, at http://www.rrc.state.tx.us/divisions/support-divisions/pio/pio.html.

Purpose:
These documents are used to inform the media and public about Commission policies, decisions, actions, and programs.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Public Information Office (PIO) coordinates agency responses to media inquiries, prepares and distributes all news releases, and organizes media interviews and news conferences. The PIO also assists staff with dissemination of information regarding commission initiatives and ongoing investigations.

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? A monthly index by topic is kept for all new releases and media advisories.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Internet pages based on records:
Press releases can be found on the website of the agency, at http://www.rrc.state.tx.us/divisions/support-divisions/pio/pio.html.

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: News and/or press releases
Series item number: 1.1.019
Agency item number: B.004
Archival code: R
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: No paper or microfilm copies are present prior to 1997. Releases from 1995 to 1996 are only present on the agency's website. No releases are present prior to 1995.

Appraisal decision:
This series contains press releases, special reports, and other media advisories that report on the activities of the Railroad Commission and/or its Commissioners. Because of high general interest in the actions of this agency in oil and gas regulation, environmental concerns, natural gas safety issues, etc., this series has been appraised to be archival. The retention period of 100 years at the agency is excessive and should be shortened to the generally accepted two-year retention. At that point, these materials need to be transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division. Transfer microfilm of the paper records only if the film is of archival quality and only if both a silver halide master and a diazo copy can be sent. Otherwise, transfer the paper files. Change the retention period to two years, change the archival code to A, and transfer records dating through 1997 to the Archives. Releases only present on the agency's website will need to be printed and paper copy transferred. If possible, transfer the index.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
PIO news clips

Agency: Railroad Commission of Texas
Public Information Office

Contact: Carries Contreras, 463-2715

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: less than four cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
Original paper records retained for one year then microfilmed. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed. Current paper holdings are December 1, 1999-[ongoing]. Microfilm files date 1997-1999. The series has a retention period of 100 years. Files comprise less than four cubic feet. The paper records and a duplicate set of the microfilm are maintained in the Public Information Office at agency headquarters. Microfilm master is maintained at the State Records Center.

Description:
These are clippings from major Texas city newspapers that pertain to the Railroad Commission or the Commissioners. Dates covered are 1997-[ongoing]. The articles are photocopied on paper and distributed throughout the agency as applicable.

Purpose:
Distribution of news clippings throughout the agency keeps it informed of press coverage.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Public Information Office (PIO) coordinates agency responses to media inquiries, prepares and distributes all news releases, and organizes media interviews and news conferences. The PIO also assists staff with dissemination of information regarding commission initiatives and ongoing investigations.

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: PIO news clips
Series item number: 1.1.019
Agency item number: B.003
Archival code: R
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
The records in this series are just clippings about the Railroad Commission or the Commissioners. Clippings are not considered an archival series. Anything of note reported about RRC activities should be covered in the series News and/or press releases, or else summarized in the minutes of the agency. Decisions on litigation are in the relevant docket or litigation files, of which there are several described in this report. These clippings are not archival. Replace the archival code of R with an E and add the following note to the Remarks column for this series - "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission, March 16, 2001."

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Correspondence, administrative

Agency: Railroad Commission of Texas
Finance and Administration Division

Contact: Gaye Dodd, 463-7267

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:
Retained in the Finance and Administration Division at agency headquarters for three years according to the retention schedule. Dates covered are 1995-[ongoing]. Files comprise about three cubic feet.

Description:
These are memos and correspondence relating to the operation of the Finance and Administration Division. Dates covered are 1995-[ongoing]. Memos include requests of the division to the Commissioners pertaining to division operations. Correspondence consists of copies of outgoing letters to state agencies or other outside parties. Incoming letters are generally filed with the document they pertain to, such as vouchers, contracts, etc. Topics generally include financial and other support operations, such as accounting, purchasing, and budget.

Purpose:
These record communication of the Finance and Administration Division with the Commissioners and other RRC staff, and outside parties.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Finance and Administration Division manages and directs the Commission's support services and financial support functions. Services include providing strategic planning assistance, budget planning, accounting services, property management, federal grant administration, and purchasing and performance measurement reporting.

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems:
This is an agency-wide series. On the retention schedule five divisions/offices have administrative correspondence and each is described and appraised separately in this report.

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Correspondence, administrative
Series item number: 1.1.007
Agency item number: A.007
Archival code: R
Retention: CE+3

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
This is correspondence of the Finance and Administrative Division. This division is responsible for financial and support operations of the agency. It does not have any regulatory functions. Documentation of its activities is summarized in the annual financial report of the agency, and planning activities are recorded in the legislative appropriation requests and the strategic plans. That is sufficient documentation of the activities of this division. This series has been appraised to be non-archival. It needs to be added to the retention schedule as a separate series of administrative correspondence in the Finance and Administrative Division's section of the retention schedule. Replace the archival code of R with an E and add the following note to the Remarks column for this series - "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission, March 16, 2001."

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Executive orders

Agency: Railroad Commission of Texas
Oil and Gas Division

Contact: Elsa Bosque, 463-6905

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: less than one cubic foot.

Agency holdings:
Retained by the agency as long as they are administratively valuable - at least five years after they are superseded. Dates covered are 1920s-[ongoing]. Each department within the Oil and Gas Division is responsible for filing items within this records series. Files comprise four cubic feet.

Description:
These are orders and T-bar memos of the Oil and Gas Division of the Railroad Commission, dating 1920s-[ongoing]. T-bar memos are administrative orders or directives, issued with Commission approval, that concern high-level personnel actions, advisory committee appointments, high visibility grants and contracts, or program changes. Orders, signed by commissioners, report the outcome of contested cases brought before the commission, or concern policy or program changes.

These records document significant changes or new agency policies, programs, and procedures affecting the Oil and Gas Division. For example, the orders and T-bar memos create Statewide rules to govern oil and gas operations and contested cases, such as Rule 37/38 field exception applications; to adopt appropriate field rules for fields and amendments to rules as necessary, including spacing, density and allocation formulas; and to establish procedures for hearing contested cases and complaints.

Orders are microfilmed as part of the series Notices and orders. The paper original and the microfilm are maintained as part of that series, Notices and orders. A copy of an order may also be filed in the series Hearing files.

Purpose:
The orders and T-bar memos are used to obtain administrative approval on changes in policies and programs affecting the Oil and Gas Division. Orders are also issued to report the outcome of contested cases brought before the commission.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement:
Arrangement is dependent on the matter and section within the division. Some items may be filed as correspondence, in the hearing files, or in other series.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? A topical index is available.

Problems:
Orders are considered part of this series and the series Notices and orders, but filed with the latter series.

This is an agency-wide series. On the retention schedule two divisions/offices have executive orders and each is described and appraised separately in this report.

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Executive orders
Series item number: 1.1.011
Agency item number: A.011
Archival code: A
Retention: US+5+AV

Archival holdings:
Original orders, 1928-1977, 49 linear ft.
Records present in this series include notices of hearings, original orders, and special emergency rules, dating 1928-1977. Original orders were issued by the Oil and Gas Division to govern the drilling of oil and gas wells and the operation of the fields.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps:
No records present prior to the early 1920s at the agency; no records present at the Archives prior to 1928.

Appraisal decision:
This series partially overlaps the series Notices and orders, that has been appraised as an archival series. We are considering this series based on the t-bar memos, since the orders are filed in the Notices and orders series. T-bar memos, similar in nature to executive orders in other agencies, concern administrative issues at the highest level in the Commission, and some concern changes in programs or policies. Orders concerning the outcome of contested cases are filed in the Notices and orders series.

Because this series of T-bar memos and orders documents high-level decisions within the agency regarding one of the largest divisions, this series is appraised as archival. Maintain the archival code of A on the retention schedule. The retention period should be shortened, from US+5+AV, to US+5. The agency does not need to maintain this record for a long period. The files from the 1920s through those that have fulfilled the US+5 retention period need to be transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division at the agency's earliest convenience. Also, this series needs to be added to the schedule as a separate series under the Oil and Gas Division section of the retention schedule, with an archival code of A.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Speeches and papers

Agency: Railroad Commission of Texas
Oil and Gas Division

Contact: Elsa Bosque, 463-6905

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:
Retained by the agency for 2 years according to the retention schedule. Original materials are retained by each department head within the Oil and Gas Division. Dates covered are 1995-[ongoing]. Speeches comprise between 3-5 cubic feet.

Description:
These are original notes or text of speeches delivered in conjunction with agency work, pertaining to various oil and gas matters. Dates covered are 1995-[ongoing]. Many of the speeches are given in conjunction with training, others are presentations to groups. Speakers include the O&G Division director, assistant directors, and other staff. Speeches are made to groups such as Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission, Petroleum Industry Data Exchange (PIDX), and the National Association of Royalty Owners (NARO). Presentations are on topics such as promoting electronic filing to industry and professional associations or the web-based permitting system.

Speeches and papers given by the Commissioners are maintained in a separate series, listed as part of the records of the Commissioners' offices.

Purpose:
Speeches provide both general and specific information about the functions of the agency to the public.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement:
Varies, dependent on files of each department.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems:
There is no centralized file for this series within the Oil and Gas Division, rather each department keeps its own. Also, this is an agency-wide series. On the retention schedule three divisions/offices have speeches and each is described and appraised separately in this report.

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Speeches and papers
Series item number: 1.1.040
Agency item number: A.038
Archival code: R
Retention: 2

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
This series contains notes and text of speeches delivered by staff of the Oil and Gas Division. According to RRC staff, speeches/papers given by staff are their interpretation of a rule or policy, and do not reflect agency policy. Also, many of the speeches are in conjunction with training. While there is a great deal of public interest in the actions of the Railroad Commission, especially the Oil and Gas Division, this series does not provide information about agency operations that could not be found elsewhere. Additionally, staff are just giving their opinion of why a policy or program is a certain way. We have appraised the speeches/papers of the commissioners to be archival since they are the highest ranking officials of the agency and they would best reflect policies, regulation, etc. That is sufficient coverage of this kind of record. The series is currently listed as an agency-wide series on the schedule. The Oil and Gas Division needs to add this series to their section of the schedule, with an archival exemption code of E and the following note in the Remarks section "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, March 16, 2001."

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Reports, annual and biennial (narrative)

Agency: Railroad Commission of Texas
Oil and Gas Division

Contact: Elsa Bosque, 463-6905

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: several inches

Agency holdings:
Retained by the agency for AC+6 according to the retention schedule. Current holdings are 1935-1936, 1939-[ongoing], comprising 6.5 linear feet.

Description:
This is the annual report of the Oil and Gas Division, dating 1935-1936, 1939-[ongoing]. It provides yearly compilations of data from RRC records and from annual reports of oil and gas companies, including crude oil and gas production, crude oil and gas allowables, drilling permits issued, gasoline plants and refineries in the state, hydrocarbon liquids recovered on leases, and other statistical data. This report is published and sent to the Publications Depository.

Purpose:
Dissemination by publication of yearly statistical compilations on oil and gas production and related issues.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records:
This is a publication.

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Reports - biennial or annual (narrative)
Series item number: 1.066
Agency item number: A.030
Archival code: A
Retention: AC+6

Archival holdings:
Oil and Gas Annual Report, 1935-1936, 1939-1973

A related series with production statistics is:
Miscellaneous, 1932-1933, 1940, 1947, 5 linear inches
These records consist of oil production statistics compiled by the Oil Accounting and Statistical Department in 1932-1933 for the East Texas Field and, in April 1940, for the entire state. Also present is testimony from a 1947 hearing on salt water disposal, and a 1947 speech by the chairman of the Interstate Oil Compact Commission on its history and functions.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:
Oil and Gas Annual Report, 1935-1936, 1939-1996

Gaps: No reports exist prior to 1935. Reports were not produced in 1937 or 1938.

Appraisal decision:
This series item number is the same used for annual or biennial reports of an agency. The RRC has not produced agency-wide annual reports since the 1930s; it does produce an annual financial report with a brief narrative about each division's activities. The bigger divisions began producing annual division reports in the 1930s. This review describes the annual report of the Oil and Gas Division. It is mostly a series of statistical compilations, covering oil and gas allowables, production, refineries, etc. over the past year, some production data goes back to the 1930s, other statistics cover 10-15 years. The reports provide a good summary of oil and gas statistics over a long period of time; they will serve in place of some records. This series has been appraised to be archival. This series needs to be added to the Oil and Gas Division's section of the retention schedule. Retain the archival code of A and the note in the Remarks column - that sending copies of the report to the Publications Depository fulfills the archival requirement. We recommend changing the series code to 1.1.067 because 1.1.066 is used for biennial or annual agency reports, not those of divisions.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Agency rules, policies and procedures

Agency: Railroad Commission of Texas
Oil and Gas Division

Contact: Elsa Bosque, 463-6905

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: 1 cubic foot

Agency holdings:
Records are retained in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. Retention period is US+3 years. Dates covered are 1990s-[ongoing]. Estimate of volume is six cubic feet.

Description:
These are directives, T-bar memoranda (see Executive orders series), manuals, and departmental procedures of the Oil and Gas Division. Dates covered are the 1990s-[ongoing]. The records cover a variety of oil and gas matters. Many of the manuals are published and made available to operators and the general public, such as Permitting Services and Production Services Sections: a filing procedures manual or Underground injection control manual. Compiled sets of rules, such as Texas oil and gas conservation laws or Rules having statewide general application to oil, gas, and geothermal resource operations within the state of Texas are also published and made available to operators and the general public. These publications are deposited in the Publications Depository of the Library and Archives Commission.

Purpose:
Guidelines, directives, policies and procedures are issued by the agency in fulfillment of legislative mandates or missions. The results of the mandates usually impose requirements or have effects on other entities.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Topical by subject

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records:
Several manuals are published, including:

Permitting Services and Production Services Sections: a filing procedures manual, Oil and Gas Division, Railroad Commission. Latest publication is dated 1999.

Discussions of law, practice and procedure, Railroad Commission. Latest publication is dated 1991.

Production Allocation Section filing procedures manual, Oil and Gas Division, Railroad Commission. Date of latest published edition is unknown, not on RRC current publications list.

Underground injection control manual, Railroad Commission. Latest publication is dated Feb. 2000.

Well completion and plugging manual, Railroad Commission. Latest publication is dated March 1698.

Water Protection Manual, Railroad Commission. Latest publication is dated May 1999.

Rules (and comments re: proposed rules) are published in the Texas Register; adopted rules are published in the Texas Administrative Code. Also, topically oriented sets of rules are published, including:

Rules having statewide general application to oil, gas, and geothermal resource operations within the state of Texas, Railroad Commission. Latest publication is dated May 2000.

General rules of practice and procedure, Railroad Commission. Latest publication is dated May 1997.

Texas oil and gas conservation laws, Railroad Commission. Latest publication is dated May 2000.

Internet pages based on records:
Texas Administrative Code is available through the RRC website, http://www.rrc.state.tx.us/rules/index.html

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Agency rules, policies and procedures
Series item number: 1.1.025
Agency item number: A.024
Archival code: R
Retention: US+3

Archival holdings:
Texas oil and gas conservation laws, Railroad Commission, 1938.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:
Yes, publications from this series are deposited here, including:

Permitting Services and Production Services Sections: a filing procedures manual, Oil and Gas Division, Railroad Commission of Texas. Latest edition is 1999. The Documents Collections holds several earlier editions.

Production Allocation Section filing procedures manual, Oil and Gas Division, Railroad Commission. Latest edition in the Documents Collections is 1993, it holds several earlier editions.

Rules (and comments re: proposed rules) are published in the Texas Register; adopted rules are published in the Texas Administrative Code.

Discussions of law, practice and procedure, Railroad Commission, 1992, 1994.

Underground injection control manual, Railroad Commission, several editions in the 1980s and 1990s.

Well completion and plugging manual, Railroad Commission, several editions in the 1980s and 1990s.

Water Protection Manual, Railroad Commission, several editions in the 1980s and 1990s.

Rules having statewide general application to oil, gas, and geothermal resource operations within the state of Texas, Railroad Commission, several editions in 1980s and 1990s, and 2000.

General rules of practice and procedure, Railroad Commission, several editions in the 1970s, 1980s, 1990s.

Texas oil and gas conservation laws, Railroad Commission, several editions in the 1980s and 1990s.

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
This series contains directives, T-bar memos, rules, policies, and manuals. Executive orders are also found in the series Executive orders. Any rules adopted are published in the Texas Register and the Texas Administrative Code. Many manuals and topically oriented sets of rules are published and deposited in the Publications Depository. The manuals provide a considerable amount of detail about the operations of this division and oil and gas operations in Texas. Legislation and rules are discussed in the manuals when applicable to the use of forms or specific procedures, such as plugging a well. This series has been appraised to be archival. Add this series to the section of the retention schedule containing records of the Oil and Gas Division with an archival code of A. Add a note in the Remarks section as follows: "Manuals and handbooks deposited in the Publications Depository of the Library and Archives Commission fulfills the archival requirement for this series." If the Oil and Gas Division produces similar manuals to those listed above that are not published and distributed through the Depository, it needs to send copies of those manuals to the Archives and Information Services Division. Included could be other manuals that instruct staff or operators on specific procedures to follow in situations such as cleaning up oil spills. This appraisal does not include manuals dealing with routine financial and personnel matters.

The record copy of T-bar memos should be filed in the series Executive orders. The T-bar memos in this series should be considered to be copies.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Plans and planning records

Agency: Railroad Commission of Texas
Oil and Gas Division

Contact: Elsa Bosque, 463-6905

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: unknown

Agency holdings:
Retained by the agency for 3 years after completion of a plan, according to the retention schedule. Dates covered are 1990-[ongoing]. Each department in the Oil and Gas Division maintains its own planning documents. Files comprise about 10 cubic feet.

Description:
These are plans and planning records from various departments in the Oil and Gas Division of the Railroad Commission, dating 1990-[ongoing]. The records cover a variety of activities designed to enhance the overall productivity of the division and protect correlative rights and the environment. Planning records include creating a plan for the justification for capital purchases involving all departments within the division, such as purchasing an Electronic Document Managing System or promoting an electronic compliance application and approval process. Another record proposes ways to improve the processes involved for field inspectors that will assist with the Oil Field Cleanup Program and will reduce the cost of plugging wells with state funds.

Purpose:
Planning records are created in the process of developing new or redefining old oil and gas programs, services, or projects to enhance the overall productivity of the division and protect correlative rights and the environment.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: varies by department

Access constraints:
Personal information present--employee names, home addresses and phone numbers, and social security numbers, is confidential under V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 552.117; driver's license numbers are confidential under V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 552.130.

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems:
There is no centralized file for this series within the Oil and Gas Division, rather each department keeps its own. Also, this is an agency-wide series. On the retention schedule three divisions have plans and planning records and each is described and appraised separately in this report. Two divisions have it listed separately on the schedule under the records of its division, one division (the Oil and Gas Division) uses the agency-wide series listing.

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Plans and planning records
Series item number: 1.1.024
Agency item number: A.023
Archival code: R
Retention: AC+3

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: No records exist prior to 1990.

Appraisal decision:
This series consists of planning records from various departments within the Oil and Gas Division. Some of the plans cover capital purchases, such as an electronic document management system, which do not need archival documentation. Other plans cover changes the division is making in services, programs, and projects that will increase the efficiency of the division and protect correlative rights and the environment. The Oil and Gas Division needs to create two series of planning records to be added to its section of records on the records retention schedule - one for capital purchases, one for other planning records of the division. The first series (for purchases) should be coded as non-archival, and possibly can fall under a non-planning series of records--check with a records consultant. The latter series (planning records not related to capital purchases), should have an archival code of A with a retention period of AC+3. Transfer archival planning records that have fulfilled their retention period to the Archives now, then yearly thereafter.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Reports and studies

Agency: Railroad Commission of Texas
Oil and Gas Division

Contact: Elsa Bosque, 463-6905

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: about 4 cubic feet

Agency holdings:
Retained by the agency for three years according to the retention schedule. Each department in the Oil and Gas Division retains its own reports and studies. Dates covered are 1996-[ongoing]. Files comprise about 20 cubic feet.

Description:
These are annual, sub-annual, or special reports or studies on non-fiscal aspects of the Oil and Gas Division, dating 1996-[ongoing]. The subjects of the reports are oil and gas operations, regulation, etc. There are serial publications (annual, monthly), single issue reports, and ad hoc reports prepared for specific situations such as the Electronic Compliance and Approval Project (ECAP). Many, if not most, of the publications are sent to the Publications Depository of the Library and Archives Commission.

Purpose:
These reports document the Oil and Gas Division's specific programs, projects, etc. to enhance the production of its departments. The reports also provide information to oil and gas operators and others interested in oil and gas regulation, operation, etc.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: varies within each department, either topical or chronological

Access constraints:
If the following personal information is present, it is confidential: employee names, home addresses and phone numbers, and social security numbers are confidential under V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 552.117; driver's license numbers are confidential under V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 552.130.

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? unknown

Problems:
There is no centralized file for this series within the Oil and Gas Division, rather each department keeps its own. Also, this is an agency-wide series. On the retention schedule two divisions have reports and studies and each is described and appraised separately in this report.

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records:
These are published reports, too numerous to list. Some titles include Gas Proration Schedule, Offshore Production Report, and Drilling Completion and Plugging Summary.

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Reports and studies
Series item number: 1.1.067
Agency item number: A.029
Archival code: R
Retention: 3

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:
There are numerous single issue and annual/monthly reports by the Oil and Gas Division in the Documents Collection.

Gaps: None according to the agency.

Appraisal decision:
The reports described in this series could also be considered part of an agency publications series. They are published reports, mostly statistical and produced on a monthly or annual basis. And, they are sent to the Publications Clearinghouse. Some single issue reports as well as some of the serial reports, such as the Offshore Production Report provide good summaries of RRC activities. There is enough value in the reports to warrant archival retention. This series has been appraised to be archival. This series needs to be added to the Oil and Gas Division's section of the retention schedule. Change the archival code of R to A. Add a note in the Remarks column of the schedule as follows: "Archival requirement is fulfilled by sending copies of the reports produced to the Publications Depository Program of the Library and Archives Commission."

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Publication development files

Agency: Railroad Commission of Texas
Oil and Gas Division

Contact: Elsa Bosque, 463-6905

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: unknown

Agency holdings:
Retained as long as administratively valuable by the agency. Dates covered are 1995-[ongoing]. Each department within the Oil and Gas Division retains its own publication development files. Files comprise nine cubic feet.

Description:
These files consist of background material, drafts, prints, and all other work pertaining to publications produced by the Oil and Gas Division regarding oil and gas related matters. Dates covered are 1995-[ongoing]. All publications are sent to the Publications Depository of the Library and Archives Commission.

Purpose:
These records are used to produce publications of the Oil and Gas Division.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: varies within each department, either topical or chronological

Access constraints:
If the following personal type of information is present, it is confidential: employee names, home addresses and phone numbers, and social security numbers are confidential under V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 552.117; driver's license numbers are confidential under V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 552.130.

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? unknown

Problems:
There is no centralized file for this series within the Oil and Gas Division, rather each department keeps its own. Also, this is an agency-wide series. On the retention schedule two divisions have publication development files and each is described and appraised separately in this report.

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records:
The published reports are too numerous to list. Some titles include Gas Proration Schedule, Offshore Production Report, and Drilling Completion and Plugging Summary.

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Publication development files
Series item number: 1.3.002
Agency item number: A.026
Archival code: R
Retention: AV

Archival holdings:
No records in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:
There are numerous single issue and annual/monthly publications by the Oil and Gas Division in the Documents Collection.

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
The publication development files are used to produce published reports of the Oil and Gas Division. The reports have little in the way of original artwork, photographs or other items valued in publication development files. And, the reports are sent to the Publications Clearinghouse. This series has been appraised to be non-archival. This series needs to be added to the Oil and Gas Division's section of the retention schedule. Change the archival code to E and add the following note to the Remarks column of the schedule: "Archival review code removed subsequent to appraisal by the Archives and Information Services Division, Library and Archives Commission, March 16, 2001."

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Monthly Summary of Texas Natural Gas

Agency: Railroad Commission of Texas
Oil and Gas Division

Contact: Connie Smith, 463-6838

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional

Agency holdings:
According to the retention schedule, the original record copy is retained for one year, then microfilmed. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed. Records in this series have yet to be filmed. The current holdings are 1936-[ongoing], comprising less than one cubic foot. Records are housed in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. The retention period is 100 years.

Description:
This series consists of 13 tables of monthly summaries of natural gas storage including: ultimate disposition of all gas; gas well gas and casinghead gas production and disposition by district; hydrocarbon liquids produced from natural gas; cycling plant, gasoline plant and other gas plant operations; percentage of plant flaring; pressure maintenance and repressuring plant operations; gas exported from Texas and gas storage operations. Dates covered are 1936-[ongoing]. Most of the tables are published in the Oil and Gas Division's Oil and Gas Annual Report or the Annual Report of Texas Natural Gas.

Purpose:
These tables track historical capacity of gas storage in the state of Texas to meet/offset peak demand for natural gas in the market served by the natural gas industry of the state.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: The official copy at the agency must be checked out from the Oil and Gas Division.

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records:
Some data is published in the Oil and Gas Division's Oil and Gas Annual Report and Annual Report of Texas Natural Gas.

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Monthly Summary of Texas Natural Gas
Series item number: none
Agency item number: A.4.095
Archival code: R
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
Oil and Gas Annual Report, 1935-1936, 1939-1973

Texas Documents Collection holdings:
Oil and Gas Annual Report, 1935-1936, 1939-1996
Annual Report of Texas Natural Gas, 1978-1984, 1987-1992

Gaps: No summaries exist prior to 1936.

Appraisal decision:
These summaries track the historical gas storage capacity in the state. This data is available through the published annual reports of the Oil and Gas Division, which is sufficient coverage of these summaries. Remove the archival code of R from the retention schedule.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Notices and orders

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division

Contacts: Elsa Bosque, 463-6905

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: about 2 cubic feet.

Agency holdings:
Original paper record is retained permanently although notices and orders dating 1928-1977 were transferred several years ago to the Library and Archives Commission.. Records at the agency are dated 1978-[ongoing], comprising 94 linear feet (2 of the boxes not yet filmed). Files are maintained in the Central Records area of the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters.

There are 10 cubic feet of orders dating ca. 1932-1951 that have not been microfilmed.

Paper records are microfilmed at the end of the calendar year. Microfilm master is maintained at the State Records Center, duplicate kept at agency headquarters. The microfilm has a retention period of 100 years. Dates of the microfilm are 1978-1998. Orders are also present on fiche for 1928-1982. Items filmed before 1982 and perhaps the fiche were likely not filmed to ANSI standards. There are currently 100 rolls of microfilm. Number of fiche is unknown.

Description:
These are notices of hearings and final orders from hearings held by the Oil and Gas Section of the Office of the General Counsel. Dates covered are 1928-[ongoing]. The hearings concern various oil and gas issues including field rules, secondary recovery projects, maximum efficient rates of production, determining responsibility for the proper plugging of abandoned wells, and preventing and controlling oil and gas pollution. This series also includes copies of final and agreed orders issued by the RRC as a result of administrative enforcement, see also the series Closed administrative penalty cases (4.113). An in-house database is used to track oil and gas cases.

The agency feels the notices and orders need a permanent retention period because of environmental concerns and legal rights issues. Original orders are summarized in the minutes of the Railroad Commission as Special Orders.

These records do not include Rule 37 hearings; see Rule 37 hearings (4.009 and 4.010). Also not included are transcripts or exhibits; see instead the series - Transcripts of testimony (4.008); Hearing files (4.011 and 4.012). See also the series Closed administrative penalty cases (4.113) for files concerning administrative enforcement actions taken by the Railroad Commission.

A small group of orders is located in unscheduled records that was separated from this series years ago. This group contains orders re: pressure maintenance, gas storage, and vacuum hearings for 1935-1948. See the series Orders.

Regulation of oil and gas operations by the Railroad Commission is governed by 16 TAC, Chapter 3.

Purpose:
Original orders are issued by the Railroad Commission to govern the drilling, completion and operation of wells in the field.

Agency program:
Created in 1891, the Texas Railroad Commission was the first regulatory agency in the State of Texas (House Bills 1,2, and 58, 22nd Legislature, Regular Session). It originally had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. The legal focus was on intrastate passenger and freight activities. Interstate jurisdiction fell under the U.S. Interstate Commerce Commission. For the first twenty-five years of its existence, the Railroad Commission was largely concerned with regulating railroads, setting rates, receiving complaints, and making investigations. As other controversies arose where the Legislature deemed that the public interest could best be served by regulation, additional duties were assigned to the Railroad Commission.

The Railroad Commission's authority was broadened beginning in 1917 with the passage of the Pipeline Petroleum Law, Senate Bill 68, 35th Legislature, Regular Session, that declared pipelines to be common carriers like railroads and placed them under the Commission's jurisdiction. This was the first act to designate the Railroad Commission as the agency to administer conservation laws relating to oil and gas.

The Commission's regulatory and enforcement powers in oil and gas were increased by Senate Bill 350 of the 36th Legislature, Regular Session, the Oil and Gas Conservation Law, effective June 18, 1919. This act gave the Railroad Commission jurisdiction to regulate the production of oil and gas. Acting upon this legislation, the Commission adopted in 1919 the first statewide rules regulating the oil and gas industry to promote conservation and safety, including Rule 37. This rule requires minimum distances between wells at drilling sites in order to protect field pressure and correlative rights.

The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

The Office of the General Counsel is the enforcement branch of the agency. The Office of the General Counsel is the enforcement branch of the agency. The Oil and Gas Section holds hearings on matters dealing with producing, storing, transporting, reclaiming, and processing oil and gas. It also conducts hearings to determine responsibility for the proper plugging of abandoned wells and preventing and controlling oil and gas pollution.

Arrangement: Notices are arranged chronologically by year, then docket number; orders are arranged by year, then docket number.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? Yes, there is an index and a database providing access to the notices and orders.

Problems:
The hearings are conducted by the Oil and Gas Section of the Office of the General Counsel, but the records are housed in the Central Records area of the Oil and Gas Division. The records are located in the Oil and Gas Division's section of the retention schedule. Hearing or litigation records in other divisions are treated in the same manner on the retention schedule.

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Internet pages based on records:
Hearing schedules are posted on the RRC site, see http://www.rrc.state.tx.us/divisions/support-divisions/gc/hearschd/hearschd.html

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Notices and orders (paper)
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.006
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Title: Notices and orders (microfilm)
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.007
Archival code: none
Retention: 100

Archival holdings:
Original orders, 1928-1977, 49 linear ft. [paper records]
Records present in this series include notices of hearings, original orders, and special emergency rules, dating 1928-1977. Original orders were issued by the Oil and Gas Division to govern the drilling of oil and gas wells and the operation of the fields.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: No records are present prior to 1928, either at the Archives or the agency.

Appraisal decision:
Orders are a summary record reporting what the RRC decides in oil and gas hearings. Some cases involve serious environmental issues and legal production issues and need to be retained. When Paul Beck, former guide survey archivist, surveyed the orders held in the Archives, he noted that these records showed the Railroad Commission at one of its most influential tasks - the setting of oil field allowables; but they became routine and predictable and there was no access to individual wells. He also questioned whether we needed to keep all of the notices and orders or perhaps sample to document the activity. After having surveyed all of the oil and gas litigation files series, I feel the notices and orders are the best source of summary documentation about the actions taken by the RRC in oil and gas cases. This is a major function of the agency and needs to be documented. Though some orders are routine and predictable, there are cases that are unique. Over time, different issues become more important than others while some remain center stage through the years. The notices and orders provide a historical perspective on concerns in the oil and gas industry. This series has been appraised as archival. Add an archival code of A to the retention schedule for the paper records (series 4.006). Change the retention period for series 4.006 from PM to AV, and a note in the Remarks column - "Records will be transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission after microfilming."

Transfer microfilm of the paper records from 1977-1998 only if the film is of archival quality and only if both a silver halide master and a diazo copy can be sent. Otherwise, transfer the paper files. Future transfers can be done after the records are microfilmed. There are also several transfiles of older orders, dating ca. 1932-1951 that have not been filmed yet, according to the agency. Once they are filmed, transfer a copy of the film to the Archives. If the agency decides not to film the old files, transfer the paper records to the Archives.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Rule 37 hearings

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division

Contacts: Elsa Bosque, 463-6905

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: about 24 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
Oversized and color coded paper records are retained permanently, comprising about 87 cubic feet. The rest of the hearing files are microfilmed monthly, paper copy generally destroyed after filming according to the retention schedule. The agency retains about 261 cubic feet of paper records, duplicated on microfilm, because of color used on the original documents or because the font is so small it cannot be read. Dates of the paper records are 1930s-1999. Microfilm master is maintained at the State Records Center. The paper records and a duplicate of the microfilm are maintained in the Central Records area of the Oil and Gas Division. The microfilm has a retention period of 100 years. Dates of the microfilm are 1926-[ongoing]. The agency holds two cubic feet of older paper copies of Rule 37 files, dating 1921-1924, that have not been filmed.

Description:
These are hearing files concerning Rule 37, a rule that requires minimum distances between wells at drilling sites in order to protect field pressure and correlative rights. Types of materials present are generally correspondence, applications to drill, transcripts, plats, maps, and permits for drilling. Dates covered are 1921-1924, 1926-[ongoing]. Rule 37 hearings are not regular hearings and they have their own unique docketing system. The files are individual applications by fee owners, leaseholders, and oil and gas companies for permits to drill on parcels of land too small to meet Rule 37's minimum distance requirements. An application to drill includes the following types of data - date, name of company or operator, name of lease, location of lease, field name, number of acres in lease, distance to nearest lease, depth of well, spacing pattern, density pattern, etc. The application to drill also notes if Rule 37 is involved, and if so, then the names and addresses of all offsetting operators or unleased mineral interest owners of each adjacent tract are provided, along with a plat. The correspondence is from the applicant to the RRC explaining why the exception should be granted. There are waivers from adjacent property/lease holders of oil, gas or mineral rights. There could also be letters of objection from oil and gas companies, neighbors, etc. When there are serious objections, a hearing is held. Hearing transcripts may be present, along with permits to drill issued by the Railroad Commission.

The agency feels the Rule 37 records need a permanent retention period because of legal rights issues. These files can be used in legal cases, such as those to track correlative rights violations.

Statewide Rule 37 concerns spacing requirements between wells (16 TAC,�3.37).

Purpose:
These files document the exception process to Rule 37 spacing requirements, as allowed under Statewide Rule 37 (16 TAC, �3.37).

Agency program:
Created in 1891, the Texas Railroad Commission was the first regulatory agency in the State of Texas (House Bills 1,2, and 58, 22nd Legislature, Regular Session). It originally had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. The legal focus was on intrastate passenger and freight activities. Interstate jurisdiction fell under the U.S. Interstate Commerce Commission. For the first twenty-five years of its existence, the Railroad Commission was largely concerned with regulating railroads, setting rates, receiving complaints, and making investigations. As other controversies arose where the Legislature deemed that the public interest could best be served by regulation, additional duties were assigned to the Railroad Commission.

The Railroad Commission's authority was broadened beginning in 1917 with the passage of the Pipeline Petroleum Law, Senate Bill 68, 35th Legislature, Regular Session, that declared pipelines to be common carriers like railroads and placed them under the Commission's jurisdiction. This was the first act to designate the Railroad Commission as the agency to administer conservation laws relating to oil and gas.

The Commission's regulatory and enforcement powers in oil and gas were increased by Senate Bill 350 of the 36th Legislature, Regular Session, the Oil and Gas Conservation Law, effective June 18, 1919. This act gave the Railroad Commission jurisdiction to regulate the production of oil and gas. Acting upon this legislation, the Commission adopted in 1919 the first statewide rules regulating the oil and gas industry to promote conservation and safety, including Rule 37. This rule requires minimum distances between wells at drilling sites in order to protect field pressure and correlative rights.

The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

The Office of the General Counsel is the enforcement branch of the agency. The Office of the General Counsel is the enforcement branch of the agency. The Oil and Gas Section holds hearings on matters dealing with producing, storing, transporting, reclaiming, and processing oil and gas. It also conducts hearings to determine responsibility for the proper plugging of abandoned wells and preventing and controlling oil and gas pollution.

Arrangement: Numerically by case number.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? There is an index and a database that provide access to these case files.

Problems:
The paper files and microfilm need to have the same retention, as the paper files consist of oversized or colored items that are not filmed.

The hearings are conducted by the Oil and Gas Section of the Office of the General Counsel, but the records are housed in the Central Records area of the Oil and Gas Division. The records are listed in the Oil and Gas Division's section of the retention schedule. Hearing or litigation records in other divisions are treated in the same manner on the retention schedule.

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Rule 37 hearings - several destruction requests were submitted between February 1986 and March 1698 to destroy paper records after microfilming. Numbers (seem to be case numbers) rather than dates identified the records on most requests. The last request gives an ending date of May 1997.

Publications based on records: None

Internet pages based on records:
Hearing schedules are posted on the RRC site, see http://www.rrc.state.tx.us/divisions/support-divisions/gc/hearschd/hearschd.html

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Rule 37 hearings (paper)
Series item number: none
Agency item number 4.009
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Title: Rule 37 hearings (microfilm)
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.010
Archival code: none
Retention: 100

Archival holdings:
Rule 37 cases (also titled - Special permits and rule 37 case files), 1926-1936, 95 cubic ft.
Records present in this series include special permits, correspondence, plat maps, transcripts from hearings, legal documents, and permit orders of granted applications. Dates of the files are 1926-1936. Special permits are issued by the Oil and Gas Division as exceptions to the Division's drilling rules. The majority of the permits are exceptions to the minimum spacing requirements of Rule 37.

Attorney General's Office, Litigation files - Rule 37 cases are present in a some of the litigation files, mainly in the 1930s.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps:
Legislation creating Rule 37 was passed in 1919, files begin in 1921. There may have been cases filed in 1919-1920. In addition, no files are present for 1925, either at the agency or at the Archives.

Appraisal decision:
Rule 37 cases concern requests for exceptions to spacing requirements between wells. The requests are frequent. The files contain a great deal of information - drilling permits and applications to drill have data about operators, leases, spacing patterns of wells, etc.; there are also plats, correspondence, and transcripts. Not only does this series provide information about the spacing request, it also documents opposition by adjacent land and lease owners and others. The agency feels the Rule 37 records need to be retained permanently because of legal rights issues involved. The records could be used in legal cases, such as tracking correlative rights violations or related issues. Tonia Wood, appraisal archivist working with Attorney General litigation files, has pointed out that a number of Rule 37 cases are present in the Attorney General litigation files (of which a sampling will be retained).

The old Rule 37 case files were summarized in the minutes of the agency. Without the names of applicants or the location of the lease, the minutes do not fully document the cases. And, this practice has been discontinued. This series is appraised as archival because of the legal issues involved and the value of the information in the files. Add an archival code of A to the retention schedule for the paper records (series 4.009). Change the retention period for series 4.009 from PM to AV, and a note in the Remarks column - "Records will be transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission after microfilming."

Transfer microfilm of the paper records from 1937-present only if the film is of archival quality and only if both a silver halide master and a diazo copy can be sent. Otherwise, transfer the paper files. Future transfers can be yearly as the files are microfilmed. Transfer film of the old files from 1921 to 1924 to the Archives and Information Services Division as soon as the microfilming is completed. If the RRC decides not to film the old files, transfer those paper records to the Archives now.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Transcripts of testimony

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division

Contacts: Elsa Bosque, 463-6905

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: several rolls of microfilm

Agency holdings:
Original paper record is filmed as volume warrants. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed. There are two types of transcripts filmed - statewide hearings, 1939-[ongoing], and docket hearings, 1938-[ongoing]. There are currently 851 rolls of microfilm and no paper records. Microfilm master is maintained at the State Records Center, duplicate kept at agency headquarters. The series has a retention period of 100 years.

Description:
These are transcripts of testimony from hearings held by the Oil and Gas Section of the Office of the General Counsel. Dates covered are 1939-[ongoing] for statewide hearings, 1938-[ongoing] for docket hearings. The hearings concern various oil and gas issues including field rules, secondary recovery projects, maximum efficient rates of production, responsibility for the proper plugging of abandoned wells, and prevention and control of oil and gas pollution. An in-house database is used to track oil and gas cases.

These records do not include Rule 37 hearings; Rule 37 hearings are part of another series, Rule 37 hearings (4.009 and 4.010). The records also do not include the notices and orders; notices and orders are part of the series Notices and orders (4.006 and 4.007). Exhibits, notes, etc. from the hearings are part of the series Hearing files (4.011 and 4.012).

The agency feels the transcripts need a 100 year retention period because of environmental concerns and legal rights issues.

Regulation of oil and gas operations by the Railroad Commission is governed by 16 TAC, Chapter 3.

Purpose:
Transcripts record testimony presented in hearings held by the agency to govern the drilling, completion and operation of wells in the field.

Agency program:
Created in 1891, the Texas Railroad Commission was the first regulatory agency in the State of Texas (House Bills 1,2, and 58, 22nd Legislature, Regular Session). It originally had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. The legal focus was on intrastate passenger and freight activities. Interstate jurisdiction fell under the U.S. Interstate Commerce Commission. For the first twenty-five years of its existence, the Railroad Commission was largely concerned with regulating railroads, setting rates, receiving complaints, and making investigations. As other controversies arose where the Legislature deemed that the public interest could best be served by regulation, additional duties were assigned to the Railroad Commission.

The Railroad Commission's authority was broadened beginning in 1917 with the passage of the Pipeline Petroleum Law, Senate Bill 68, 35th Legislature, Regular Session, that declared pipelines to be common carriers like railroads and placed them under the Commission's jurisdiction. This was the first act to designate the Railroad Commission as the agency to administer conservation laws relating to oil and gas.

The Commission's regulatory and enforcement powers in oil and gas were increased by Senate Bill 350 of the 36th Legislature, Regular Session, the Oil and Gas Conservation Law, effective June 18, 1919. This act gave the Railroad Commission jurisdiction to regulate the production of oil and gas. Acting upon this legislation, the Commission adopted in 1919 the first statewide rules regulating the oil and gas industry to promote conservation and safety, including Rule 37. This rule requires minimum distances between wells at drilling sites in order to protect field pressure and correlative rights.

The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

The Office of the General Counsel is the enforcement branch of the agency. The Office of the General Counsel is the enforcement branch of the agency. The Oil and Gas Section holds hearings on matters dealing with producing, storing, transporting, reclaiming, and processing oil and gas. It also conducts hearings to determine responsibility for the proper plugging of abandoned wells and preventing and controlling oil and gas pollution.

Arrangement: Statewide hearings by docket number, docket hearings by district and docket number.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? An index is available at the agency.

Problems:
The hearings are conducted by the Oil and Gas Section of the Office of the General Counsel, but the records are housed in the Central Records area of the Oil and Gas Division. The records are listed in the Oil and Gas Division's section of the retention schedule. Hearing or litigation records in other divisions are treated in the same manner on the retention schedule.

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Transcripts of testimony - several destruction requests were submitted between February 1986 and March 1698 to destroy the paper records after microfilming. Numbers (seem to be case numbers) rather than dates identified the records on most requests. The last request gives an ending date of May 1997.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Transcripts of testimony
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.008
Archival code: none
Retention: 100

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps:
Statewide hearing transcripts are not present prior to 1939, nor are docket hearing transcripts prior to 1938. Since there are orders present from 1928, it is assumed that the corresponding transcripts are missing.

Appraisal decision:
Transcripts record testimony in oil and gas hearings conducted by the RRC. While testimony can be used as a source of what transpired during a hearing, orders provide a summary of the actions taken by the Commissioners as a result of the hearing process. The orders are sufficient documentation of the hearing outcome. Another series, Hearing files, contains exhibits, examiners notes, etc. that could shed some light on the cases involved. Hearing files and the series Notices and orders have been appraised as archival. Transcripts are not needed to further document the hearing process.

Transcripts have been appraised as non-archival. Since the series did not contain an archival code no changes need to be made to the retention schedule.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Hearing files

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division

Contacts: Elsa Bosque, 463-6905

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: generally 40-50 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
Original paper records are retained permanently. A few files have been microfilmed - part of a special project (Districts 1,2,3 and part of 4, 1930-1964). Dates covered are ca. 1930-[ongoing]. There are 50 rolls of microfilm, and 3,699 linear feet of paper records. Microfilm master is maintained at the State Records Center. The paper records and duplicate microfilm are kept in the Central Records area of the Oil and Gas Division. The series has a retention period of 100 years for the microfilm files, permanent for paper records.

Description:
These are files from hearings of the Railroad Commission, containing correspondence, examiners notes, and exhibits, that can include geological and seismic data, well logs, reserve estimates, calculated depletion rates, plats, and maps. Copies of notices and orders are present in some files. Dates covered are ca. 1930-[ongoing]. The hearings are held by the Oil and Gas Section of the Office of the General Counsel. The hearings concern various oil and gas issues including field rules, secondary recovery projects, maximum efficient rates of production, determination of responsibility for the proper plugging of abandoned wells, applications to inject water into reservoirs for enhanced oil or gas production, and prevention and control of oil and gas pollution. An in-house database is used to track oil and gas cases.

Railroad Commission engineers use the data submitted by operators, such as reserve estimates, ideas for development, and calculated depletion rates, along with the production records (see the series Oil and gas production reports (4.017)) and the well potential information (see the series Oil and gas potential files (4.015)) to create a more accurate picture of reserves. Engineers will also use other records from the hearing files, such as seismic data, plats and maps, and logs to help determine oil and gas reserves. For example, well logs provide a sample or snapshot of a wellbore that indicates the physical characteristics and properties of the layers of the earth where the wellbore has been drilled. Data in the hearing files is interpreted to determine the character of a reservoir.

There are several series containing early hearing files that were separated from the main series of hearing files years ago for unknown reasons. They are described separately in the following series: Hearing files re: exceptions of Statewide Rule 21, ca. 1938; Hearing files - Yates and Diamond "M" Unit, 1936-1938; Miscellaneous hearing files, 1935, 1938-1943, 1946-1948; and Hearings, Panhandle Field, prior to 1940.

Another series containing some production data for reservoirs and data re: water injection into oil and gas reservoirs is the series H-1: Application to inject fluid into a reservoir productive of oil or gas (denied). This series contains denied applications, approved applications are maintained with the hearing files.

Notices and orders are part of the series Notices and orders (4.006 and 4.007). Transcripts are part of the series Transcripts of testimony (4.008). Rule 37 hearings are part of another series, Rule 37 hearings (4.009 and 4.010). Enforcement action re: administrative penalties enforced by the Commission are in the series Closed administrative penalty cases (4.113).

Regulation of oil and gas operations by the Railroad Commission is governed by 16 TAC, Chapter 3.

Purpose:
Hearing files present exhibits, notes, etc. from hearings held by the agency to govern the drilling, completion and operation of wells in the field.

Agency program:
Created in 1891, the Texas Railroad Commission was the first regulatory agency in the State of Texas (House Bills 1,2, and 58, 22nd Legislature, Regular Session). It originally had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. The legal focus was on intrastate passenger and freight activities. Interstate jurisdiction fell under the U.S. Interstate Commerce Commission. For the first twenty-five years of its existence, the Railroad Commission was largely concerned with regulating railroads, setting rates, receiving complaints, and making investigations. As other controversies arose where the Legislature deemed that the public interest could best be served by regulation, additional duties were assigned to the Railroad Commission.

The Railroad Commission's authority was broadened beginning in 1917 with the passage of the Pipeline Petroleum Law, Senate Bill 68, 35th Legislature, Regular Session, that declared pipelines to be common carriers like railroads and placed them under the Commission's jurisdiction. This was the first act to designate the Railroad Commission as the agency to administer conservation laws relating to oil and gas.

The Commission's regulatory and enforcement powers in oil and gas were increased by Senate Bill 350 of the 36th Legislature, Regular Session, the Oil and Gas Conservation Law, effective June 18, 1919. This act gave the Railroad Commission jurisdiction to regulate the production of oil and gas. Acting upon this legislation, the Commission adopted in 1919 the first statewide rules regulating the oil and gas industry to promote conservation and safety, including Rule 37. This rule requires minimum distances between wells at drilling sites in order to protect field pressure and correlative rights.

The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

The Office of the General Counsel is the enforcement branch of the agency. The Oil and Gas Section holds hearings on matters dealing with producing, storing, transporting, reclaiming, and processing oil and gas. It also conducts hearings to determine responsibility for the proper plugging of abandoned wells and preventing and controlling oil and gas pollution.

Arrangement: Numerical by hearing number.

Access constraints: None known

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? Yes, an R-base database.

Problems:
Although the microfilm is a convenience copy, it would be preferable for the paper files and microfilm to be retained together. The microfilmed files consist of a special project that was filmed (Districts 1,2,3 and part of 4, 1930-1964).

The hearings are conducted by the Oil and Gas Section of the Office of the General Counsel, but the records are housed in the Central Records area of the Oil and Gas Division. The records are listed in the Oil and Gas Division's section of the retention schedule. Hearing or litigation records in other divisions are treated in the same manner on the retention schedule.

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Internet pages based on records:
Hearing schedules are posted on the RRC site, see http://www.rrc.state.tx.us/divisions/support-divisions/gc/hearschd/hearschd.html

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Hearing files (paper)
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.011
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Title: Hearing files - microfilm
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.012
Archival code: none
Retention: 100

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: Files may not be present prior to 1930, exact dates of earliest files are unknown. Orders began in 1928, so hearings should date from that point.

Appraisal decision:
These are exhibits, notes, etc. from hearings that could shed some light on the cases involved. Additionally the files are used administratively for other reasons by the RRC. According to the agency, engineers use the data submitted by operators as exhibits (such as reserve estimates, ideas for development, and calculated depletion rates) along with the production records (see the series Oil and gas production reports (4.017)) and the well potential information (see the series Oil and gas potential files (4.015)) to create a more accurate picture of reserves. The engineers will also use other hearing records, such as seismic data, plats and maps, and logs to help determine oil and gas reserves. The hearing files have value both as evidence presented in a hearing and are valuable to RRC engineers in determining oil and gas reserves. The hearing files have been appraised as archival. They should be kept at the agency as long as administratively valuable. Add an archival code of A to the retention schedule for the paper records (series 4.011). Change the retention period for series 4.011 (paper records) from PM to AV. Transfer files that no longer have administrative value to the agency (if any at this point) to the Archives and Information Services Division now. Future transfers can be yearly as the files fulfill their retention period.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
FERC filings

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division

Contacts: Diane Simmons, Rail Division, 463-7187

Obsolete record series? Yes
Replaced by: None specifically, a series containing a similar filing is ST-1: Application for Texas severance tax incentive certification (4.028).

Ongoing record series? No

Agency holdings:
The paper files were microfilmed and then sent to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in Washington, D.C. Microfilm master is maintained at the State Records Center, duplicate kept at agency headquarters in the Central Records area of the Oil and Gas Division. The retention period for the microfilm is 100 years. Dates covered are 1978-ca. 1990. There are 1,033 rolls of microfilm.

Description:
These are applications sent by operators to the Railroad Commission to establish pricing categories they wished to use for natural gas. Dates covered are 1978-ca. 1990. Type of data on the form includes the operator's name, district, field name and number, lease name and number, well location, and category or type of gas. Attachments sent with the applications include plats of well locations, completion reports, drilling permits, and production reports. Also present are final orders approving the applications. The completion reports include the operator's name, field and lease name, well number, county of well site, location, pipeline company used, completion or recompletion date, field data and pressure calculations, gas measurement data, type of completion, date and number of drilling permit, name of company/person filing notice of intention to drill, number of wells on the site, number of acres in the lease, distance to nearest well, elevation, depth of well, name of reservoir, formation (geological) record, casing record, tubing record, liner record, and producing interval. The drilling permits have similar data. The production reports detail past production from a well.

This filing was required by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) (per the Natural Gas Policy Act). The Railroad Commission enforced the filing beginning in 1978. Operators sent in an application packet (form and attachments) that listed the category of their gas well. Pricing depended on the category. Once correctly filed, the RRC issued a final order that the application was correct for the category requested. The RRC or FERC did not set the final price; the pricing category established what the operator could use to negotiate his price with buyers. When natural gas was federally deregulated, about 1990, the filings to FERC ceased. However, the Railroad Commission continued the regulatory process with similar filing requirements for operators seeking high cost gas severance tax incentives; see the series ST-1: Application for Texas severance tax incentive certification (series 4.028). The ST-1 form contains data similar to FERC filings.

These files can be used to help determine royalty payments from leases by establishing the price category over a period of years. They also designate wells and areas of Texas, and contain some engineering and geological information. Because gas wells can be producing for years, the agency has said the records need a long retention period; it could be perhaps 50 years.

Regulation of oil and gas operations in Texas by the Railroad Commission is governed by 16 TAC, Chapter 3.

Purpose:
These filings determined the correct pricing category for different types of natural gas.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: By type, then date, then docket number.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? An index is available at the agency.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has (or had) the original paper records.

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: FERC filings
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.013
Archival code: none
Retention: 100

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
The records were required federal filings concerning the pricing of natural gas. This function is no longer performed, but similar information is now gathered for people filing high cost gas severance tax incentives, see the series ST-1: Application for Texas severance tax incentive certification (series 4.028). I see little archival value in the FERC filings. However, the attachments, primarily the completion reports, contain a substantial amount of data of engineering and geological value, as stated by the agency, and are closely related to the above mentioned series. The difference between the two series is not in the information gathered, but in the function. The FERC filings were filed to establish the correct price category for natural gas. The severance tax incentives are filed to obtain a severance tax exemption.

Although there is archival value in the attachments filed with the FERC applications, the attachments are duplicates of materials filed in other series, primarily the series, Oil and gas potential files (4.015). This latter series has been appraised as archival, so the information present in the attachments does not need to be documented in the series, FERC filings. The FERC filings have been appraised to be non-archival as there is little historical value in the applications. Since the series does not carry an archival code no changes need to be made to the retention schedule.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Wildcat and suspense files

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Well Information

Contacts: Elsa Bosque, 463-6905

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: 10-20 linear ft.

Agency holdings:
Original paper record is microfilmed as time permits. Once microfilmed, the paper record is destroyed. Paper files are dated 1985-[ongoing] and comprise 303 linear feet. Microfilm is dated 1960-1985. There are 445 rolls of microfilm. Paper records and a duplicate of the microfilm are maintained in the Central Records area of the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. Microfilm master is maintained at the State Records Center. The series has a retention period of 100 years.

Description:
This series serves as a suspense file for drilling permits issued by the Railroad Commission, dating 1960-[ongoing]. A file gives the operator's name and address, location, field name, API (American Petroleum Institute) number, depth, well-spacing pattern, density pattern, acreage in drilling unit, type of well, etc. The permits are accompanied by plats of the areas showing wells, etc. The permits are maintained in this series until the well is completed or plugged, then they are transferred to the series Oil and gas potential files (4.015). If a permit was issued but no action was taken regarding either well completion or plugging, then the permits remain in this suspense series as expired or cancelled.

The agency feels the need to maintain the wildcat and suspense files for 100 years for environmental reasons; also, wells may sit in a suspense state for many years before final action (completion or plugging) is commenced. Additionally, data on the permit provides some history on the well being drilled that correlates with data found in the series Oil and gas potential files.

Regulation of the oil and gas industry by the Railroad Commission is governed by 16 TAC, Chapter 3. Drilling permits are issued in accordance with Statewide Rule 5 (16 TAC, �3.5).

Purpose:
These files are maintained as a temporary location for drilling permits until the well is completed or plugged. Drilling permits are issued in accordance with Statewide Rule 5 (16 TAC, �3.5).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? Yes

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Wildcat/suspense files, 1985 and prior - several destruction requests were submitted between June 1990 and November 1995 to destroy paper records dating 1985 and prior after microfilming (exact dates not given).

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Wildcat and suspense files
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.014
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: No records present prior to 1960.

Appraisal decision:
The wildcat and suspense files supplement and complement data in another series, Oil and gas potential files. The environmental data in the wildcat and suspense files has value, especially in wells that have had problems; and the drilling permits provide some data on the history of the well. The wildcat and suspense files are important environmentally and historically in conjunction with the Oil and gas potential files. Additionally, the agency feels the need to maintain these records long-term since wells may sit in a suspense state for many years before final action (completion or plugging) is commenced. Data in the drilling permit provides some history on the well being drilled that correlates with data found in the series Oil and gas potential files.

The wildcat and suspense files have been appraised to be archival as they provide historical documentation on wells being drilled. Add an archival code of A to the retention schedule. The RRC feels it needs to keep the records in-house 100 years; I recommend a shorter retention period, perhaps AC+50, then transferring the files to the Archives. When records become eligible for transfer, transfer microfilm of the paper records only if the film is of archival quality and only if both a silver halide master and a diazo copy can be sent. Otherwise, transfer the paper files. There are currently no records eligible for transfer in this series.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Oil and gas potential files

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Well Information

Contacts: Elsa Bosque, 463-6905

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: 10-20 linear ft.

Agency holdings:
The original paper record is microfilmed as time permits. Once microfilmed, the paper record is destroyed. Paper records are present for 1986-[ongoing], comprising 599 linear feet. Dates of microfilm vary with record type: Well records, 1920-1966; Drilling permits, 1950-[ongoing]; Electric logs, 1985-[ongoing]; Rule 37 permits, 1919-1983; Directional surveys, 1948-[ongoing]; and overall Oil and gas potential files, 1964-1985 in microfilm and 1986-[ongoing], paper. There are 7,806 rolls of microfilm, 154,900 microfiche. Paper records and a duplicate of the microfilm are maintained in the Central Records area of the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. Microfilm master is maintained at the State Records Center. The series has a retention period of 100 years.

Description:
This series contains completion reports, well logs, drilling permits, and plats. Dates are roughly 1919-[ongoing], but vary with record type: Well records, 1920-1966; Drilling permits, 1950-[ongoing]; Electric logs, 1985-[ongoing]; Rule 37 permits, 1919-1983; Directional surveys, 1948-[ongoing]; and overall Oil and gas potential files, 1964-[ongoing]. The information in each file gives the operator's name and address, location, field name, API (American Petroleum Institute) number, well-spacing pattern, depth and geological horizon of the production, current conditions and status of the well (fracturing efforts, plugging, etc.), description of the completion including casing, and test information on the wellbore. The drilling permits are accompanied by plats showing the location of the wells. The well potential file information assists in both a well-specific sense (whether a wellbore can be reentered, where drilling/production may be optimal, drilling and completion specifications to be anticipated, etc.) and for the entire reservoir (pressures, rates of decline, potential reserves). For example, well logs provide a sample or snapshot of a wellbore that indicates the physical characteristics and properties of the layers of the earth where the wellbore has been drilled. The well logs and related records are interpreted to determine the character of a reservoir.

The agency states the oil and gas potential files need to be maintained for 100 years for environmental reasons. The files provide historical data about individual wells in conjunction with the series - Wildcat and suspense files (4.014), the series Oil and gas production reports (4.017), and the series Hearing files (4.011 and 4.012). Additionally, drilling permits are only good for two years. When companies reapply to drill, they can use data maintained in these files for the new permits. Some wells may be plugged for years, then opened back up for production, thus another reason to keep this data long-term.

Completion reports can also be found in the series FERC filings (4.013) and ST-1: Application for Texas severance tax incentive certification (series 4.028).

Regulation of oil and gas operations by the Railroad Commission is governed by 16 TAC, Chapter 3. Drilling permits are issued in accordance with Statewide Rule 5 (16 TAC,�3.5).

Purpose:
The well potential files maintain information about the current conditions and status of oil and gas wells drilled, the depth and location of the well, description of the well completion, and test information on the wellbore. Drilling permits are issued in accordance with Statewide Rule 5 (16 TAC, �3.5).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: By district, then field, then well.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? An index is available at the agency.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Oil and gas potential files - several destruction requests were submitted between February 1986 and March 1698 to destroy paper records dating 1973-1985 after microfilming.

Directional surveys - several destruction requests were submitted between February 1986 and March 1694 to destroy paper records dating 1980-1986 after microfilming.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Oil and gas potential files
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.015
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: Possibly. Some record types were maintained separately for years before they were merged to form this series - Oil and gas potential files. Possible gaps are: Drilling permits prior to 1950, Electric logs prior to 1985, Rule 37 permits after 1983 (may be in the Rule 37 files), Directional surveys prior to 1948, and overall oil and gas potential files prior to 1964.

Appraisal decision:
This series provides a wealth of information about individual wells, including the location, description, status, and the wellbore. For example, the well logs provide a sample or snapshot of a wellbore that indicates the physical characteristics and properties of the layers of the earth where the wellbore has been drilled. The well logs and related records are interpreted to determine the character of a reservoir. Additionally, the logs, completion reports and other files help provide a history of oil and gas reservoirs, and are used in documenting remaining reserves. Interpretation of the data in these files along with historical production (see series Oil and gas production reports (4.017)), and the Hearing files (4.011 and 4.012), allows the engineer to infer remaining reserves as well as the optimal recovery techniques. I agree with the agency that these files have a very long-term value, both for environmental concerns and the historical data about the wells and oil and gas reservoirs.

The Oil and gas potential files have been appraised as archival. Add an archival code of A to the retention schedule. The RRC feels it needs to keep the records in-house 100 years; I recommend a shorter retention period, perhaps keeping the files 50 years at the agency, then transferring the files to the Archives. If the RRC shortens the retention period as recommended, it can transfer the files through 1950 to the Archives now. Transfer microfilm of the paper records only if the film is of archival quality and only if both a silver halide master and a diazo copy can be sent. Otherwise, transfer the paper files.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Schedule reports

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Well Information

Contacts: Elsa Bosque, 463-6905

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: several sets of microfiche

Agency holdings:
The records have been microfilmed in past years but no longer according to the retention schedule; however, original paper records are currently being filmed for microfiche. Once filmed, the paper copy is destroyed. There are currently no paper records at the agency. There are different types of schedule reports, each filmed at different times, covering different years. Depth bracket yardsticks, July-August 1987, are on microfiche. Gas Schedules, 1935-1983, are on microfilm; 1984-[ongoing], on microfiche. Oil Schedules, 1932-1983, are on microfilm; 1984-[ongoing], on microfiche. Gatherer and operator stripout reports, November 1980-[ongoing], on microfiche. Gas purchaser/nominator reports, October 1980-[ongoing], are on microfiche. Oil and Gas Purchaser Stripout reports, April 1988-[ongoing], are on microfiche. Gas Supplements, 1945-1978, are on microfilm; 1979-[ongoing], on microfiche. Oil Supplements, 1946-1978, are on microfilm; 1979-[ongoing], on microfiche. There are 2,280 rolls of microfilm, 59,938 microfiche. Microfilm/microfiche master is maintained at the State Records Center, duplicate kept in the Central Records area of the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. The retention period for this series is 100 years.

Description:
These files contain various oil and gas schedule reports, dating roughly 1932-[ongoing]. There are several types of reports, each with different dates: Depth bracket yardsticks, July-August 1987; Gas schedules, 1935-[ongoing]; Oil schedules, 1932-[ongoing]; Gatherer and operator stripout reports, November 1980-[ongoing]; Gas purchaser/nominator reports, October 1980-[ongoing]; Oil and gas purchaser stripout reports, April 1988-[ongoing]; Gas supplements forms, 1945-[ongoing]; and Oil supplements, 1946-[ongoing]. The schedule reports are for all wells assigned to a lease. A report shows the district, field, operator, lease, active/inactive status of the well, producing depth of the wells, density of drilling, the daily or monthly production allowables, proration schedules, etc. Not all this information is available for each report.

The agency feels it needs to keep the schedule reports for 100 years because staff and the public access this data, especially from wells that may have been shut down for years. According to the agency, separate annual reports (one for oil, one for gas) combine some of the data present in these reports. Various oil and gas statistics re: storage, production, exports, refinery operations, etc. are summarized in the Oil and Gas Division Annual Report.

Regulation of oil and gas operations by the Railroad Commission is governed by 16 TAC, Chapter 3.

Purpose:
The schedule reports record information about the status and production of oil and gas wells.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: By type, then date.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? Yes

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Oil schedules - several destruction requests were submitted between December 1986 and October 1989 to destroy paper records dating 1962-1969 after microfilming.

Gas schedules - several destruction requests were submitted between January and June 1990 to destroy paper records dating 1935-1968 after microfilming.

Possibly related destruction requests: Monthly gas gatherer report (T-7) - several destruction requests were submitted between August 1993 and April 1997 to destroy paper records dating 1991-1996 after microfilming.

Publications based on records:
Some oil and gas statistics are in the annual report of the Oil and Gas Division, though it is unknown how much of the data is drawn from this series. And, according to the agency, separate annual reports (one for oil, one for gas) combine some of the data present in these reports. Titles of these reports are unknown at this time.

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Schedule reports
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.016
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
Oil and Gas Division Annual Report, 1935-1936, 1939-1973.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:
Oil and Gas Division Annual Report, 1935-1936, 1939-1996.

Gaps:
There are several sets of schedules, some with possible gaps. It is unknown when each schedule began, though none would have begun before 1919. Possible gaps are: Gas schedules prior to 1935, Oil schedules prior to 1932, Gatherer and operator stripout reports prior to November 1980, Gas purchaser/nominator reports prior to October 1980, Oil and gas purchaser stripout reports prior to 1988, Gas supplement reports prior to 1945, and Oil supplement reports prior to 1946.

Appraisal decision:
There is some production data present in the schedule reports, as well as the number of wells in a field, operators, and the active status of the well. The agency has stated the reports get used, especially by people seeking information about wells that have been shut down for years. It also feels there is a need to keep this data long term, especially for wells that have been shut down for long periods. Production data is present in several other series that have been appraised as archival, Oil and gas potential files, Hearing files, and Oil and gas production reports. Well status is also covered in the Oil and gas potential files. Data present in the series mentioned above is sufficient coverage of these functions. The schedule reports have been appraised to be non-archival. Since the series did not have an archival code no changes need to be made to the retention schedule.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Oil and gas production reports

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Well Information

Contacts: Elsa Bosque, 463-6905

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: several rolls of microfilm, several sets of microfiche

Agency holdings:
The original paper records are microfilmed monthly. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed. Dates of the records vary as there are several sets of files. Dates are: Annual books (oil/gas), 1930-[ongoing]; Oil ledgers, 1931-[ongoing]; Gas ledgers, 1933-[ongoing]; Monthly operator reports, oil wells, 1967-[ongoing]; Monthly operator reports, gas wells, 1924-[ongoing]; Producer's monthly reports, 1967-1994; Monthly crude oil production, 1935-1982, 1994-[ongoing]; and Forecast for the production and disposition of gas, 1950-1986. There are 10,893 rolls of microfilm, 41,002 microfiche. Microfilm/microfiche master is maintained at the State Records Center, duplicate kept in the Central Records area of the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. The series has a retention period of 100 years.

Description:
These are oil and gas production reports providing monthly and annual production per lease for oil and monthly and annual production per well for gas, dating roughly 1924-[ongoing]. There are several types of reports with varying dates: Annual books (oil/gas), 1930-[ongoing]; Oil ledgers, 1931-[ongoing]; Gas ledgers, 1933-[ongoing]; Monthly operator reports, oil wells, 1967-[ongoing]; Monthly operator reports, gas wells, 1924-[ongoing]; Producer's monthly reports, 1967-1994; Monthly crude oil production, 1935-1982, 1994-[ongoing]; and Forecast for the production and disposition of gas, 1950-1986. Engineers at the RRC use this data to determine rates of production decline and cumulative production volumes for oil/gas reservoirs. Interpretation of the historical production, combined with data found in other series, such as - Oil and gas potential files (4.015) and Hearing files (4.011 and 4.012), allows engineers to infer remaining reserves as well as the optimal recovery techniques. Various oil and gas statistics re: storage, production, exports, refinery operations, etc. are summarized in the Oil and Gas Division Annual Report.

The agency states the production reports need to be maintained for 100 years for environmental reasons. The reports also provide historical production data about individual wells, and in combination with the series referred to above, historical data about oil and gas reservoirs and their reserve status.

Some production reports are present in another series, ST-2: Application for Texas individual 3-year inactive wellbore certification (4.029). These are test reports on production submitted by operators requesting an inactive wellbore certification. Some production figures submitted by operators requesting a severance tax incentive based on incremental production can be found in the series ST:1 - Application for Texas severance tax incentive certification (4.028). The test reports may not necessarily be submitted with the ST-1 forms, but could be present as operators have to attest that the barrel of oil (BOE) production per well per day during the period in question does not exceed seven BOE.

There are several series of old records in the RRC that contain production data, some duplicated in the oil and gas production reports. See the series reviews for: Reports of wells producing by artificial methods in the East Texas Field, 1944-1947; Miscellaneous reports, East Texas Field, 1930s and 1950s; Oil and casinghead gas production reports, Panhandle Field, 1957-1958; Injection reports, 1957-1968; Miscellaneous oil and gas reports, 1937-1946, 1948-1961; and Monthly operator reports, gas wells, 1924-1925.

Regulation of oil and gas operations by the Railroad Commission is governed by 16 TAC, Chapter 3.

Purpose:
These reports provide a record of production of oil and gas wells.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: By type, then chronological by date, then alphabetical by operator.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? An index is available at the agency.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Oil ledgers/oil production ledgers - several destruction requests were submitted between June 1986 and April 1995 to destroy paper records dating 1936-1978, 1983-1992 after microfilming.

Gas ledgers/gas production ledgers - several destruction requests were submitted between June 1986 and April 1995 to destroy paper records dating 1953-1966, 1983-1992 after microfilming.

Oil and gas production ledgers, district 9 - a destruction request was approved in June 1986 to destroy paper records dating 1936-1978 after microfilming.

Producer's monthly report of oil wells (P-1) - several destruction requests were submitted between February and April 1994 to destroy paper records dating 1974-1991 after microfilming.

Producer's monthly report of gas wells (P-2) - several destruction requests were submitted between February and April 1994 to destroy paper records dating 1974-1991 after microfilming.

Producer's forecast (gas) (G-7) - several destruction requests were submitted between February and December 1986 to destroy paper records dating 1984-1986 after microfilming.

Publications based on records:
Some statistics are in the Oil and Gas Division Annual Report.

Internet pages based on records:
Some production data is available on the agency's website, see http://www.rrc.state.tx.us/divisions/og/statistics/index.html

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Oil and gas production reports
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.017
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
Oil and Gas Division Annual Report, 1935-1936, 1939-1973.

A related series providing some statistical compilations is:
Miscellaneous, 1932-1933, 1940, 1947, 5 linear inches
These records consist of oil production statistics compiled by the Oil Accounting and Statistical Department in 1932-1933 for the East Texas Field and, in April 1940, for the entire state. Also present is testimony from a 1947 hearing on salt water disposal, and a 1947 speech by the chairman of the Interstate Oil Compact Commission on its history and functions.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:
Oil and Gas Annual Report, 1935-1936, 1939-1996.

Gaps:
There are several sets of reports, some with gaps. It is unknown when each report began, though none would have begun before 1919. The missing reports may be annual books (oil/gas), prior to 1930; Oil ledgers, prior to 1931; Gas ledgers, prior to 1933; Monthly operator reports, oil wells, prior to 1967; Monthly operator reports, gas wells, prior to 1924; Producer's monthly reports, before 1967 and after 1994; Monthly crude oil production, prior to 1935, 1983; and Forecast for the production and disposition of gas, prior to 1950 and after 1986.

Appraisal decision:
The production reports provide a record of production for oil and gas wells. Interpretation of the historical production, combined with data found in other series - Oil and gas potential files (4.015) and Hearing files (4.011 and 4.012), allows engineers to infer remaining reserves as well as the optimal recovery techniques. There are two series that contain some production records, but they are not complete sets (refer to the description) and I do not think they would be suitable replacements for the production reports. If the annual reports of the Oil and Gas Division contained a complete record of the production, they would be sufficient documentation of this series. However, it is unknown how completely the Oil and Gas Division Annual Report covers production, especially the earlier reports. The production reports have been appraised as archival because of their use with other series of RRC records to provide historical data on production of individual wells, a history of oil and gas reservoirs, and to help document remaining reserves. Add an archival code of A to the retention schedule. The RRC feels it needs to keep the records in-house 100 years; I recommend a shorter retention period, perhaps keeping the records 50 years at the agency, then transferring film of the records to the Archives. If the RRC shortens the retention period as recommended, it can transfer film of the records through 1950 to the Archives. Transfer microfilm of the paper records only if the film is of archival quality and only if both a silver halide master and a diazo copy can be sent. Otherwise, transfer the paper files.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Oil and gas status reports

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Well Information

Contacts: Elsa Bosque, 463-6905

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: several rolls of microfilm, several microfiche

Agency holdings:
Original paper record is microfilmed as time permits. Once microfilmed, the paper record is destroyed. Dates covered are roughly 1930-[ongoing]. Dates of the records vary as there are several sets of files: Crude oil leases, November 1980; East Texas well status, 1941-1971; Gas status reports, 1935-[ongoing]; Oil well status reports, 1930-[ongoing]; Well status report for condensate wells and gas wells producing crude petroleum, December 1965. There are 2,293 rolls of microfilm, 1,187 microfiche. Microfilm/microfiche master maintained at the State Records Center, duplicate kept in the Central Records area of the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. The series has a retention period of 100 years.

Description:
These are test reports on wells concerning production, mostly gas production. Dates covered roughly are 1930-[ongoing]. Dates of the records vary as there are several sets of files: Crude oil leases, November 1980; East Texas well status, 1941-1971; Gas status reports, 1935-[ongoing]; Oil well status reports, 1930-[ongoing]; Well status report for condensate wells and gas wells producing crude petroleum, December 1965. There are annual and monthly reports on the open flow, rate of flow, pressure, and similar data. Some of this data may also be present in the series Oil and gas production reports (4.017). Also, various oil and gas statistics re: storage, production, exports, refinery operations, etc. summarized in the Oil and Gas Division Annual Report likely came from this series.

A related series of old records re: gas testing is the series Gas potential test files, 1933-1937. Other old series of related records re: well status or testing are Miscellaneous oil and gas reports, 1937-1946, 1948-1961; and Bottom hole pressure reports, 1947, 1950-1952.

The agency feels the need to keep the status reports long term (100 years) because operators or others may go back to this test data to check pressure readings, rate of flow, etc.

Well status reports are required under Statewide Rule 53 (16 TAC, �3.53).

Purpose:
These reports present testing data on well production status, as required under Statewide Rule 3.53 (16 TAC �3.53).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: By type, then date, then case number

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? An index is available at the agency.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Oil well status report (W-10) - several destruction requests were submitted between February 1986 and March 1698 to destroy paper records dating 1982-1997 after microfilming.

Gas well status report (G-10) - several destruction requests were submitted between February 1986 and March 1698 to destroy paper records dating 1981-1997 after microfilming.

Publications based on records:
Some production statistics are in the Oil and Gas Division Annual Report.

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Oil and gas status reports
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.018
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
Oil and Gas Division Annual Report, 1935-1936, 1939-1973.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:
Oil and Gas Annual Report, 1935-1936, 1939-1996

Gaps:
There are several sets of reports, some with gaps. It is unknown when each report began, though none would have begun before 1919. For Crude oil leases, the only report is dated November 1980. Other missing reports may be East Texas well status, prior to 1941, and after 1971; Gas status reports, prior to 1935; Oil well status reports, prior to 1930. For the Well status report for condensate wells and gas wells producing crude petroleum, the only report is dated December 1965.

Appraisal decision:
This series contains testing data on the well production status. Some of this data will also show up in the series Oil and gas productions reports (4.017). I see the need for the agency to keep the status records long-term, though I think 100 years is excessive. I do not see test data as having archival value since production data is available in other archival series, such as above. The status reports have been appraised to be non-archival. Since the series does not have an archival code no changes need to be made to the retention schedule.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Maps: paper

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Mapping

Contacts: Deborah Flados, 463-6844

Obsolete record series? Yes
Replaced by: Geographic Information System, oil and gas map layer

Ongoing record series? No

Agency holdings:
These are paper maps, maintained at agency headquarters, dating from the early 1900s to 1995. In the past, data was added to the paper maps; it is now added directly into the Geographic Information System (GIS) of the agency. The maps have a retention period of AV+20 years. There are 784 County Maps (cloth/paper): Rolled Map File Unit (1 unit), 75"w x 48"d x 62"h; Flat Map File Unit (1 unit), 54"w x 42"d x 51"h; 784 Field Maps and 72 Offshore Maps (cloth): Rolled Map Cabinets (8 cabinets), 16"w x 33"d x 52"h (each).

Description:
These are maps used by the agency to track well locations and related oil and gas data. Dates covered are the early 1900s to 1995. More recent data (well locations, etc.) is now added directly into the oil and gas layer of the agency's Geographic Information System (GIS), described in the series Geographic Information System, oil and gas map layer. Types of maps present in this series include county survey and/or ownership maps with well locations added; oil/gas field maps showing oil and gas wells and related features; maps showing survey lines and well operators; offshore maps showing well locations; and 7.5 U.S.G.S. topographic maps with survey lines added. Some of the maps are paper, some are linen. Some of the maps in this series have been used to create the oil and gas map layer of the agency's Geographic Information System. The well locations after about 1984 have been added to the GIS.

A series of county ownership maps was microfilmed, see the series Maps: microformat. The paper copies of these county ownership maps remains part of this series - Maps: paper.

There is a related series of maps described in this report, see the series Plats, that contains similar data (well locations, ownership) to maps in this series. The plats are part of a group of old unscheduled records housed in the Central Records area of the Oil and Gas Division.

Purpose:
The maps show well locations, leases, and other graphic representations of oil and gas data.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: County maps alphabetical by county name; field and offshore maps arranged by map number.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: The agency does not allow photocopying of county maps due to copyright. There are no photocopy restrictions on the field and offshore maps.

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? Yes
County maps: maps with 4 or more parts per county have an index by survey name; field maps: index by field name; offshore maps: offshore area index map

Problems:
Some maps are slowly deteriorating from wear and tear and need basic conservation measures undertaken, such as placing them in mylar sleeves for protection. This can be done upon transfer to the Archives.

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Maps: paper
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.022
Archival code: none
Retention: AV+20

Archival holdings:
We have no maps from this particular series, but we do have related oil and gas maps from the James Holdeman Collection, a manuscript collection of oil and gas maps and plats from the early to mid 20th century, covering various parts of Texas. We also have county survey maps for Texas counties, U.S.G.S. maps (mainly pre-1900); and a few maps issued by the Railroad Commission showing oil and gas wells, fields, and similar features in the state.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps:
No paper maps are present after 1995, the point when data began to be added directly in the GIS. Exact beginning dates for this series are not known. The earliest maps date to the early 1900s.

Appraisal decision:
As the appraisal archivist for the RRC, I see archival value in the oil and gas data on the maps, especially the well locations. The well locations and related oil and gas data are added by hand. Even though the agency is slowly adding all the well data to its Geographic Information System (GIS), staff have stated the paper maps are still necessary for confirmation of the data. Also, some data (well locations or similar) may be difficult to transfer accurately due to the age and condition of the maps and legibility of the writing. As the map archivist, I see archival value in the maps, not only for the oil and gas information, but also for other reasons, such as ownership features shown on the maps. Maps in this series complement similar maps already at the Archives, part of the James Holdeman Collection, and would supplement data found on the few Railroad Commission maps we hold. This series has been appraised to be archival. Add an archival code of A to the retention schedule. When the agency has completed adding data from the maps to the GIS and ceased to have regular use of the maps, transfer them to the Archives and Information Services Division.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Geographic Information System, oil and gas map layer

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Mapping

Contacts: Deborah Flados, 463-6844

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: unknown

Agency holdings:
This is a layer of maps from the early to late 20th in a Geographic Information System. Since this series is not yet on the schedule it does not have an established retention period.

Description:
This is a layer of maps providing well locations and other oil and gas data to the Geographic Information System (GIS) in the Railroad Commission. Dates of maps in this layer go back to the 1980s; added data dates to earlier in the 20th century (earliest dates unknown). Several layers work in conjunction with the oil and gas layer; base map information was obtained directly from U.S. Geological Survey 7.5 minute quadrangle maps; patent survey lines from Texas General Land Office maps were interpreted as accurately as possible over the U.S. Geological Survey base. The data on the U.S.G.S. base maps remains static. There is a layer of oil and gas data, primarily giving well locations, described in the series Maps: paper (4.22) that is still being added from the paper maps at the RRC. Some data has also been added from another set of maps, see the series Plats.

Printed copies of maps are produced upon demand, often for the public. No paper copies are maintained. Digital data can be purchased. The agency is in the process of migrating the system for use with ARCINFO software. The staff are preparing metadata for this layer of maps. Maps produced by the Rail Division are in series Geographic Information System, rail maps layer (not on schedule). Pipeline maps produced by the Gas Services Division are in the series Digital data pipeline map files - electronic (5.073).

Digital access to maps in the GIS is available through the agency directly or through its website, see http://www.rrc.state.tx.us/divisions/og/maps/index.html for oil and gas maps.

Purpose:
The oil and gas well map layer tracks the location and status of every well permitted and/or drilled in Texas, including the offshore state tracts. Data is kept current by the daily processing of incoming drilling and completion forms submitted to the Commission by oil and gas operators. The Commission's Geographic Information System (GIS) data is made available to the general public and other governmental agencies. The oil and gas industry, especially independent operators, use the GIS data for exploration and development purposes. The GIS enables Commission staff to verify location information submitted by oil and gas well operators when approving their drilling permit application. Commission field personnel, using Global Positioning System (GPS) technology, are able to identify wells in the field or navigate to a specific well site using well location data stored in the GIS. The well data is also queried and displayed for purposes of analysis and decision-making by Commission staff.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: N/A

Access constraints: None

Use constraints:
None. All data is available to the public (CD, FTP, map plot, or viewed in house). Some maps are also available through the agency's Internet site.

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? Data is indexed by county, U.S.G.S. 7.5 minute quadrangle, abstract number, API number, or offshore area.

Problems:
The agency needs to finish creating their metadata and fully integrate it into the GIS system for this map layer. And, the agency needs to consider taking snapshots of the data at various points in time.

Known related records in other agencies:
Complete sets of U.S.G.S. maps are found in several locations including the U.S. Department of the Interior, the Perry Castenada Library at the University of Texas at Austin, etc. A complete set of county survey maps is present at the Texas General Land Office.

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: Yes
The Oil and Gas Division's district boundaries map is available in two publications:
Oil and Gas Annual Report and A Filing Procedures Manual, Permitting Services and Production Services Sections.

Internet pages based on records:
Computerized Well Location Maps Information: http://www.rrc.state.tx.us/divisions/og/maps/mapinfo.html

Oil and Gas Division maps available for purchase: http://www.rrc.state.tx.us/divisions/og/maps/mapproducts.html

Oil and Gas District Boundaries map: http://www.rrc.state.tx.us/divisions/og/ogmap.html

Digital map data products: http://www.rrc.state.tx.us/other-information/automated/itssmap.html

Series data from agency schedule: This is not on the schedule.
Suggested series data from agency schedule:
Title: Geographic Information System, oil and gas map layer
Series item number: none
Agency item number: to be assigned
Archival code: none
Retention: AV

Archival holdings:
Oil and Gas Annual Report, 1935-1936, 1939-1973

Texas Documents Collection holdings:
Oil and Gas Annual Report, 1935-1936, 1939-1996

Permitting Services and Production Services Sections: a filing procedures manual, Oil and Gas Division, Railroad Commission of Texas. Latest edition is 1999. The Documents Collections holds several earlier editions.

Gaps: Unknown, since the earliest dates of the maps in the system are unknown.

Appraisal decision:
This layer ties in with the GIS layers that are described in other series, see Geographic Information System, rail maps layer (not on schedule) and Digital data pipeline map files - electronic (5.073). The oil and gas data in the GIS has archival value as it documents oil and gas well locations throughout the state. This data is especially valuable since well locations are not being added to the hard copies of the maps after 1995. The maps in the oil and gas layer of the GIS will be the only series to completely document well locations graphically throughout the state. Well locations show up in other records - on plats of oil leases or similar maps focusing on tracts of land generally contained well within a small portion of a county and attached to various applications or reports, present in numerous series. Because of the informational value of the data within the GIS, the oil and gas layer in the GIS has been appraised to be archival.

The agency needs to add this series to the schedule with an archival code of A. We are not currently accepting electronic records at the Library and Archives Commission. At some point in the future if we begin to accept such files, we will apprise the RRC on the steps necessary to migrate the system and the data to the Archives. For now, the RRC needs to comply with 13 Texas Administrative Code, Section 6.95 (b), on the Final Disposition of Electronic Records, as follows: "An electronic state record that is an archival record must be maintained by the agency through hardware and software migrations and upgrades as authentic evidence of the state's business in accessible and searchable form, except as otherwise determined by the state archivist." It also needs to keep the metadata and data dictionaries current. A copy of the database should be made regularly to document the data as it existed.

When all of the well locations from the old maps have been added to the GIS, we wish to receive a paper set of county maps showing the well locations and related data.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
ST-1: Application for Texas severance tax incentive certification

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Oil and Gas Proration Unit

Contacts: Bob Meyer, 463-6975

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: less than 0.5 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
Once a file is closed, it is microfilmed and the original paper record is destroyed. Dates are 1994-[ongoing]. Paper records comprise 2.5 cubic feet. Microfilm rolls are tallied with rolls in the series FERC filings. Microfilm master is maintained at the State Records Center. Paper records and a microfilm duplicate are kept in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. Retention period for this series is 100 years.

Description:
This is an application (form ST-1) for Texas severance tax incentive certification filed by companies or individuals with the Railroad Commission. Dates covered are 1994-[ongoing]. This form replaced form ST-2, Application for Texas individual 3-year inactive wellbore certification (see series 4.029), in 1997. Information provided on the ST-1 form includes the operator's name, address, field name and number, lease name and number, and the type of incentive being filed for (high cost gas, 2-year inactive well, incremental production, flared/vented gas marketing). Each application has additional information such as: high-cost category (for high-cost gas incentive); wellbore number, well number, re-entry plugging date (for 2-year inactive well incentive); type of production, months used to demonstrate incremental production (for incremental production incentive); months flaring or venting took place, name of gas gatherer (for flared/vented gas marketing incentive).

For high-cost gas incentives additional attachments to the application include completion reports and maps of well locations. The completion reports include the operator's name, field and lease name, well number, county of well site, location, pipeline company used, completion or recompletion date, field data and pressure calculations, gas measurement data, type of completion, date and number of drilling permit, name of company/person filing notice of intention to drill, number of wells on the site, number of acres in the lease, distance to nearest well, elevation, depth of well, name of reservoir, formation (geological) record, casing record, tubing record, liner record, and producing interval. The series Oil and gas potential files (4.015) also contains completion reports. It is unknown if the completion reports are duplicated in these two series. For the incremental production incentive, operators may need to file daily production records.

The applications affect the amount of royalty paid from leases. They also designate wells and areas of Texas, and contain some engineering and geological information that is not available in other series, according to the agency. (Much of this data is also maintained in an in-house database at the Railroad Commission.) Because oil and gas wells can be producing for years, the agency has said the series needs a long retention period, but it could be shortened to 50 years instead of 100. See the series ST-2: Application for Texas individual 3-year inactive wellbore certification (4.029), a related severance tax exemption on individual wellbores, now an obsolete form.

Additionally, the series FERC filings (4.013), contains applications filed with the RRC for the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission concerning pricing categories for gas. When natural gas was deregulated, about 1990, the RRC still gathered FERC-required information from operators, but used it for approving a severance tax incentive for high-cost gas instead of setting price categories for natural gas.

Tax exemptions for two-year inactive wells and three-year inactive wells are regulated by Statewide Rule 83 (16 TAC �3.83).

Purpose:
These forms are used by individuals and companies to apply to the Railroad Commission for severance tax incentives, as regulated by Statewide Rule 83 (16 TAC �3.83).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: By district, operator name, field, and lease/ID number.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Approved state severance tax applications - several destruction requests were submitted between November 1993 and March 1698 to destroy paper records dating 1989-1997 after microfilming.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: ST-1: Application for Texas severance tax incentive certification
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.028
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 yrs.

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
The files consist of standardized forms and attachments used to request severance tax incentives. Normally, this type of series would not necessarily be considered for archival review. However, the agency has attached a 100 year retention period, thus the review. The data on the forms provides a minimal (in my opinion) amount of data about the type of incentive being requested. However, the attachments, primarily the completion reports, contain a substantial amount of data of engineering and geological value, as stated by the agency. The staff says this information (in sum total - forms and attachments) is not available in any other series. Some data is maintained in an in-house database. There is definitely archival value in the completion reports, not so much in the incentive certification forms. The series, Oil and gas potential files (4.015), also contains completion reports, but does not necessarily include the completion reports filed with the ST-1 forms. Because of the administrative and scientific value of information in this series, primarily the completion reports and the maps, this series has been appraised to be archival. Add an archival code of A to the series. The agency has suggested shortening the retention period to 50 years. We agree. When the retention period of these records has been met, transfer them to the Archives. There are no files eligible for transfer to the Archives at this time.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
ST-2: Application for Texas individual 3-year inactive wellbore certification

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Oil and Gas Proration Unit

Contacts: Bob Meyer, 463-6972

Obsolete record series? Yes
Replaced by: ST-1: Application for Texas severance tax incentive certification

Ongoing record series? No

Agency holdings:
According to the retention schedule once the file is closed, it is microfilmed and the original paper record is destroyed. No records have been filmed yet in this series. Dates covered are 1993-1997. Files comprise 1.5 cubic feet and are maintained in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. This series has a retention period of 100 years.

Description:
This form was used by individuals and companies to apply to the Railroad Commission for a individual 3-year inactive wellbore certification. If approved by the RRC, any crude oil and gas produced was eligible for a ten-year state severance tax exemption. Dates covered are 1993-1997. In 1993, the 73rd Legislature passed a law allowing for this tax exemption (House Bill 1975, Regular Session). This form was replaced by form ST-1: Application for Texas severance tax incentive certification (see series 4.028) about 1997. Information found on the ST-2 form includes the operator's name, address, RRC district number, wellbore number, lease and field names, oil lease or gas identification number, well number, date well replugged, action taken in last three years that resulted in a change of the wellbore or completion identification (consolidation, workover, field transfer, etc.), certification as to production of wellbore, and notes by RRC recommending approval or denial. Attachments to the form are test reports on the wellbore showing production capability.

The data submitted affected the amount of royalty paid from leases. The forms designate wells and areas of Texas, and contain some engineering and geological information that is not available in other series, according to the agency. (Much of this data is also maintained in an in-house database at the Railroad Commission.) Because oil and gas wells can be producing for years, the agency has said the series needs a long retention period, but it could be shortened to 50 years instead of 100. See the series ST-1: Application for Texas severance tax incentive certification (4.028), which covers several severance tax incentives. That form is also used now for inactive wellbore certification requests.

Another series that documents the production capability of the wellbore and oil/gas reservoirs is the series Oil and gas potential files (4.106). Monthly and annual production reports on wells and leases can be found in the series Oil and gas production reports (4.017). Test reports on well production can be found in the series Schedule reports (4.016).

Tax exemptions for two-year inactive wells and three-year inactive wells are regulated by Statewide Rule 83 (16 TAC �3.83).

Purpose:
These forms were used by individuals to apply to the Railroad Commission for inactive wellbore certification, as regulated by Statewide Rule 83 (16 TAC �3.83).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: By district, operator name, field, and lease/ID number.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: ST-2: Application for Texas individual 3-year inactive wellbore certification
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.029
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None, the legislation was passed in 1993, this form was discontinued in 1997.

Appraisal decision:
These files consist of standardized forms and attachments used to request severance tax incentives for individual wellbores. Normally, this type of series would not necessarily be considered for archival review. However, the agency has attached a 100 year retention period, thus the review. The forms provide a minimal amount of data about wellbores. There could be some value in the test production reports filed as attachments. However, there are more complete production reports present in the series Oil and gas production reports (4.017), a series appraised as archival. The agency is maintaining the ST-2 files for 100 years, which is more than sufficient. And, the series Oil and gas potential files (4.015) contains information about the production capability of oil/gas reservoirs and wellbores. There is sufficient coverage about the wellbores in the above referenced series. Therefore, this series, ST-2: Application for Texas individual 3-year inactive wellbore certification, has been appraised to be non-archival. Since it did not carry an archival code no changes need to be made to the retention schedule.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
GC-1: Gas well capability

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Oil and Gas Proration Unit

Contacts: Bob Meyer, 463-6975

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: about 1 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
According to the retention schedule the original paper record is retained for one year then microfilmed. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed. No records have been filmed yet for this series. Dates covered are 1992-[ongoing]. Files comprise about 8.5 cubic feet and are maintained in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. This series has a retention period of 100 years.

Description:
These are forms (form GC-1) used by the Railroad Commission to determine daily capability of gas wells. Dates covered are 1992-[ongoing]. Gas capability is a mechanism used in setting reservoir allowables for gas wells and individual allowables (individual wells in prorated gas fields). Information on each form includes the operator's name, address, and ID number; RRC district no.; county; field name; lease name; RRC gas ID number; well number; daily capability volume; date of determination; and a certification of this daily volume, by either a professional engineer or an independent well tester. Attachments to the form are the well test data performed by the engineer or well tester. The test data includes the date of the test; producing rates for gas, condensate, and water; shut-in and flowing pressures; gas gravity; and condensate gravity.

Determining the daily capability of gas wells is regulated by Statewide Rule 31 (16 TAC, �3.31 (e)(2)). The rule covers gas well reservoirs and gas well allowables. Section 3.31 (e)(2) states "an operator may submit a substitute capability determination for any well in a prorated field that represents the maximum monthly production capability of the well under normal operating conditions for a specific six-month period."

These records are sometimes used in hearings to certify the daily capability volume of a well. They are also used in court cases to show how much a well was capable of producing, but was unable to produce because of market conditions. The agency keeps these records for long-term legal value. The records can also be used to historically document reservoir and/or individual well allowables set over a long period of time.

Purpose:
Gas capability is a mechanism used in setting reservoir allowables for gas wells and individual allowables, as allowed under Statewide Rule 31 - (16 TAC, �3.31 (e)(2)).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Chronological by year, month, then district and operator name.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: GC-1: Gas well capability
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.030
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: No records are present prior to 1992.

Appraisal decision:
This series documents gas well capability that the RRC uses to set reservoir allowables for gas wells. The records can be used to historically document reservoir and/or individual well allowables set over a long period of time. And, they have legal value - property rights value, especially in cases where operators can show what could have been produced but was not because of market conditions and RRC rules limiting production. This data complements production allowables found in another series, Reports for Market Demand, which has been appraised as archival.

This series has been appraised to be archival because of potential legal value of gas well capability records, the ability to historically track reservoir and/or well allowables through the records, and the relationship with the gas well capability records. Add an archival code of A to the retention schedule. The RRC feels it needs to keep the records in-house 100 years; I recommend a shorter retention period, perhaps keeping the files 50 years at the agency, then transferring the files to the Archives. There are currently no records eligible for transfer to the Archives.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
H-8: Crude oil, gas well liquids, or associated products loss report

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Oil and Gas Proration Unit

Contacts: Belinda Wolf, 463-6835

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: 1.5 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
Original paper record is maintained for the current and prior years. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed. The series has a retention period of 100 years. Dates covered are 1970-[ongoing]. Microfilm files are dated 1970-1997 and comprise four cubic feet. Hard copy files are dated 1998-[ongoing] and comprise three cubic feet. Microfilm master is maintained at the State Records Center. Paper records and a duplicate of the microfilm is kept in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters.

Description:
This report is a form (H-8) filed when there is a loss, theft, or spill of greater than five barrels of crude oil or condensate (the liquid from a gas well). Dates covered are 1970-[ongoing]. Information in each report includes the field name; company; RRC district; county; lease name and number; location (in survey) where loss occurred; description of facility where loss occurred; name of landowner; type of liquid hydrocarbon loss (crude oil, gas well liquid, other); date of loss and date loss reported to RRC; total number of barrels lost, recovered, and unrecovered; did loss affect inland or coastal water (if so, explain); cause of loss; and remedial measures taken and their success. There is no annual summation of this data. This data has a long-term administrative value as it documents spills and leaks and how they were cleaned up. Some H-8 data is maintained in an in-house database. Two copies of the forms are filed in the district offices, with one set forwarded to the state office. For other series that also document remedial efforts - of either abandoned sites or major spills, see Abandoned site candidate (4.085), and Operator/responsible party cleanup files (4.088). The series Complaint files/pollution: water well contamination (4.115), concerns spills/leaks unreported by operators that have polluted water wells and remedial efforts to clean up the spills or leaks.

Three specific rules regulate this filing (form H-8). Statewide Rule 20 concerns the notification of fire breaks, leaks, or blow-outs (16 TAC, �3.20). Statewide Rule 71 concerns reports of loss from fires, lightning, and leakage in pipelines (16 TAC, �3.66). Statewide Rule 91 concerns the cleanup of soil contaminated by a crude oil spill (16 TAC, �3.91).

Purpose:
These forms report spills, loss or theft of crude oil or condensate of greater than five barrels and remedial efforts taken to cleanup the spill or loss. Specific rules regulating this filing are Statewide Rules 20 (16 TAC, �3.20), 71 (16 TAC, �3.66), and 91 (16 TAC, �3.91).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Files are arranged by year, month, district, and operator.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Crude oil, gas well liquids, or associated products loss report (H-8) - several destruction requests were submitted between March 1686 and April 1997 to destroy paper records dating 1984-1995 after microfilming.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: H-8: Crude oil, gas wells, liquids, or associated products loss report
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.031
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
This series documents crude oil and condensate spills/losses and remedial steps taken to clean up the environment. This data has long term, if not permanent, value because it documents damage done to the environment and how it was cleaned up. There are several series that document remedial efforts, but do not duplicate these files on the whole. This series concerns operator produced reports. There are two series that also document remedial efforts of either abandoned sites or major spills, see Abandoned site candidate (4.085) and Operator/responsible party cleanup files (4.088). Also, the series Complaint files/pollution: water well contamination (4.115) concerns spills/leaks unreported by the operator that have polluted water wells and remedial steps taken. All of these files have long-term administrative value for the agency in carrying on its role of environmental protection.

This series, the H-8 reports, has been appraised as archival. Add an archival code of A to the retention schedule. The RRC feels it needs to keep the records in-house 100 years; I recommend a shorter retention period, perhaps keeping the files 50 years at the agency, then transferring the files to the Archives. There are no files eligible for transfer to the Archives at this time.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Reports for market demand

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Proration Unit

Contacts: Bob Meyer, 463-6975

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: 6 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
Original paper record is microfilmed as time permits. Once microfilmed, the paper record is kept for one year then destroyed. Dates are roughly 1937-[ongoing]. There are several record types present, with varying dates. Monthly reservoir market annual report, 1951-1981 on microfilm, 1979-[ongoing] on microfiche, and 1999-[ongoing] in paper, consisting of 30 rolls of microfilm, 4,585 sheets of microfiche, and three to four cubic feet of paper records. Market demand summary, 1978-1981 on microfilm, 1979-[ongoing] on microfiche, and 1999-[ongoing] in paper, consisting of 17 rolls of microfilm, 3,165 microfiche, and two-three cubic feet of paper records. Crude oil nominations summary of nominations and purchasers of crude oil, 1937-1982 (T2 form discontinued in 1970, T2A discontinued in 1994), consisting of 140 rolls of microfilm. According to the agency, paper files for this last report dating 1983-1994 were destroyed. Microfilm master is maintained at the State Records Center. Paper records and microfilm/microfiche duplicates are kept in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. The series has a retention period of 100 years.

There are paper copies of proration schedules for East Texas, dating 1963-1974, that have not been filmed, comprising three cubic feet. There are also a few paper copies of gas proration schedules for 1941 that likely have not been microfilmed.

Description:
These are monthly summary reports by the Railroad Commission that establish a reservoir allowable based on an allocation formula. Dates are roughly 1937-[ongoing]. There are several record types present, with varying dates: Monthly reservoir market annual report, 1951-[ongoing]; Market demand summary, 1978-[ongoing]; Crude oil nominations summary of nominations and purchasers of crude oil, 1937-1982; Proration schedules for East Texas, 1963-1974; Gas proration schedules, 1941. All of these reports are used to determine how much oil/gas the RRC will allow to be produced within a reservoir. The allocation formula is based on the number of producing wells in the reservoir and how much those wells are capable of producing. The reports also give detailed information about individual operators and wells - how much the wells are producing, how much they are capable of producing, the deliverability of the well, etc. The reports forecast what the RRC thinks can be produced within the reservoirs. If an operator of gas wells in a prorated gas field feels the forecast is off or wants a forecast allowing lesser or greater production, then he can file an MD-1 form, described in series Optional operator market demand forecast for gas well gas in prorated fields (series 4.032). If filed in a timely manner, the RRC will look at the request and incorporate it into the next month's allowable settings report - the Report for market demand. No annual market demand reports are produced.

Series of old related records discussing production allowables are: Master record of supplemental allowables, 1949; Injection reports, 1957-1968; Salt water production worksheets and statistical reports, 1940s, 1950s, 1970s; Injection reports, 1957-1968; and Oil and gas files, Rodessa Field, 1936-1944.

The process to establish production allowables for reservoirs is regulated by Statewide Rule 31 (16 TAC, �3.31 (d)(1)(C)). The rule covers gas well reservoirs and gas well allowables. Section 3.31 (d)(1)(C) concerns the determination of the prorated reservoir allowable and lawful market demand by the RRC.

The market demand reports have long-term legal value by documenting the market allocation formulas over a period of time. Court cases involving royalties or property rights use the formulas. There is some historical value in the documentation of the production allowables over a long period. The agency has said the retention could be shortened to perhaps 50-75 years.

Purpose:
These reports promulgate monthly production allowables for reservoirs based on an allocation formula as regulated by Statewide Rule 31 (16 TAC, �3.31 (d)(1)(C)).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: The monthly reservoir market annual reports are arranged alphabetical by field, district, county, month/year. The market demand summaries are arranged by monthly allowable, district, field, county, and operator. Arrangement of the crude oil reports is unknown.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Reports for market demand
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.032
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: Crude oil nominations summary of nominations and purchasers of crude oil, reports between 1983 and 1994 were destroyed. Proration schedules for East Texas are not present prior to 1963 or after 1974. Gas proration schedules cover only 1941, but more could be included in one of the sets of microfilmed records.

Appraisal decision:
The reports for market demand are the product of an important function of the RRC - the establishment of monthly production allowables controlling how much oil/gas the agency will allow to be produced in the state, reservoir by reservoir. These are monthly reports that are not summarized in an annual report or elsewhere. The reports do have a long-term legal value, by establishing the market allocation formulas over a period of time. This information can be used in court cases involving royalties or property rights. I agree that the reports are important, both for the legal value and some historical value in the documentation of the production allowables over a long historical period. This series also complements data found re: gas wells in the series GC-1: Gas well capability, appraised as archival.

This series has been appraised as archival because of the potential legal value of the records, the ability to historically track market allocation formulas, and the relationship with the gas well capability files. Add an archival code of A to the retention schedule. The RRC feels it needs to keep the records in-house 100 years; I recommend a shorter retention period, perhaps keeping the files 50 years at the agency, then transferring the files to the Archives. If the RRC shortens the retention period as recommended, it can transfer the files through 1950 to the Archives.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
MD-1: Optional operator market demand forecast for gas well gas in prorated fields

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Proration Unit

Contacts: Bob Meyer, 463-6975

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: about 4-5 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
Original paper record is maintained for one year then microfilmed. Once microfilmed the paper copy is destroyed. Dates of the microfiche are December 1993-December 1998, consisting of 171 microfiche. Paper records are dated 1999-[ongoing] and comprise about 10.5 cubic feet. Microfiche master is maintained at the State Records Center. The paper records and duplicate microfiche are kept in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. The series has a retention period of 100 years.

Description:
This series contains operator requests for changes in the production allocated for gas wells in prorated gas fields by the Railroad Commission. Dates covered are December 1993-[ongoing]. The RRC prepares a monthly summary report that establishes a reservoir allowable based on an allocation formula. The allocation formula is based on the number of producing wells in the reservoir and how much those wells are capable of producing. This report forecasts what the RRC thinks can be produced within the reservoirs, thus they set an allowable production. If an operator of gas wells in a prorated gas field feels the forecast is incorrect or wants a forecast allowing lesser or greater production, then he can file an MD-1 form - Optional operator market demand forecast for gas well gas in prorated fields. If filed in a timely manner, the RRC will look at the request and incorporate it into the next month's allowable settings report - the Report for market demand (series 4.032). If the operator does not file the report by that month's deadline, the RRC will add a note to that effect and the operator's request will not be considered. Information in the operator's request includes the name, P-5 (organization) number and mailing address of the operator; field name and number; the market demand forecast for the allowable month and year; and the operator's anticipated market demand for the referred month/year.

The process to request changes in the production allowables for gas fields is regulated under Statewide Rule 31 (16 TAC, �3.31 (d)(1)(C) and (D)). The rule covers gas well reservoirs and gas well allowables. Section 3.31 (d)(1)(C) concerns the determination of the prorated reservoir allowable and lawful market demand by the RRC. Section (d)(1)(D) concerns the optional operator market demand forecast.

Purpose:
These requests are a mechanism that an operator can use to request a change in the Railroad Commission production allowable forecast for reservoirs as allowed under Statewide Rule 31 (16 TAC, �3.31 (d)(1)(C) and (D)). Timely requests are incorporated into the RRC production forecasts for the following month.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Paper records are arranged chronologically by year, month, then district, and alphabetically by operator. Microfiche is arranged by fields shown on the proration schedule.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records:
A sheet summary is published.

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: MD-1: Optional operator market demand forecast for gas well gas in prorated fields
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.033
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
These forms are closely associated with the series 4.032, Reports for market demand. Those reports are the product of an important function of the RRC - the establishment of monthly production allowables, that control how much oil/gas the agency will allow to be produced in the state, reservoir by reservoir. The optional operator market demand requests for changes to the reports for market demand do have an important function as timely filed requests will be incorporated into the next month's forecast. This is a mechanism for operators to override the allocation forecasts. However, the reports produced the next month will incorporate the requests from operators in the allocation factor, which is sufficient documentation of this process. This series has been appraised to be non-archival. Since the series does not contain an archival code no changes need to be made to the retention schedule.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Plants/refinery reports

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Production Services

Contacts: Bob Meyer, 463-6975

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: several cubic feet a year, for all reports combined

Agency holdings:
Original paper record is microfilmed as time permits. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed. There are several sets of reports. Monthly report and operations statements for refineries (R-1) cover 1947-[ongoing] and consist of 37 rolls of microfilm. Monthly reports for reclamation plants (R-2) cover 1960-[ongoing] and consist of 514 microfiche. Carbon black plant reports (C-1) are dated 1940-[ongoing] and consist of an unknown number of microfilm rolls (1940-1983), 14 microfiche (1984-1997), and several boxes of paper records (1997-[ongoing]). Applications for a permit to operate a carbon black plant (C-2) are dated 1971-[ongoing] and comprise 3 microfiche (1971-1989) and several feet of paper records (1989-[ongoing]). Permits to operate a carbon black plant (C-3) are dated 1930-[ongoing] and consist of 8 microfiche (1930-1970) and several feet of paper records (1970-[ongoing]). Casinghead gas connections are dated to 1991 (earliest dates unknown, this report discontinued in 1991) and consist of several cubic feet of paper records. Gas storage data sheets (G-3) are dated 1930-[ongoing], filmed with the R-3 reports. Gas cycling reports (G-9) are dated 1961-[ongoing], comprised of 10 rolls of film (1961-1996) and several cubic feet of paper records (1996-[ongoing]). Monthly reports on gas processing plants are dated 1939-[ongoing] and comprise 480 rolls of microfilm. Certificates of compliance for gasoline plants and refineries (R-5) are dated 1938-[ongoing], comprising 4 rolls of microfilm (1938-1981), 64 microfiche (1982-1997), and two cubic feet of paper records (1997-[ongoing]). Applications for certification of compliance for cycling plants (R-6) are dated 1975-1995 and consist of 12 microfiche. Pressure maintenance and repressuring plant reports (R-7) are dated 1948-1997 and consist of 67 rolls of microfilm (1948-1983) and 55 microfiche (1984-1997). Monthly transportation and storage reports (T-1) are dated 1947-[ongoing] and consist of 1,199 rolls of microfilm (1947-[ongoing]) 1,442 microfiche (1984-1997), and 44 cubic feet of paper records (1998-2000). Nominations for the purchase of use of gas (T-3) are dated 1939-1992 (form discontinued June 1992), consisting of 513 rolls of microfilm (1939-1992) and 12 microfiche (1984-1990).

Microfilm/microfiche master is maintained at the State Records Center. Paper records and microfilm/microfiche duplicates are kept in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. The series has a retention period of 100 years.

Description:
This series consists of several reports concerning the operation of refineries and reclamation plants. Dates vary with the reports, covering a rough period from 1939 to [ongoing]. Monthly report and operations statements for refineries (R-1) cover 1947-[ongoing]. Monthly reports for reclamation plants (R-2) cover 1960-[ongoing]. Carbon black plant reports (C-1) are dated 1940-[ongoing]. Applications for a permit to operate a carbon black plant (C-2) are dated 1971-[ongoing]. Permits to operate a carbon black plant (C-3) are dated 1930-[ongoing]. Casinghead gas connections are dated to 1991 (earliest dates unknown, this report discontinued in 1991). Gas storage data sheets (G-3) are dated 1930-[ongoing]. Gas cycling reports (G-9) are dated 1961-[ongoing]. Monthly reports on gas processing plants are dated 1939-[ongoing]. Certificates of compliance for gasoline plants and refineries (R-5) are dated 1938-[ongoing]. Applications for certification of compliance for cycling plants (R-6) are dated 1975-1995. Pressure maintenance and repressuring plant reports (R-7) are dated 1948-1997. Monthly transportation and storage reports (T-1) are dated 1947-[ongoing]. Nominations for the purchase of use of gas (T-3) are dated 1939-1992 (form discontinued June 1992).

Typical information found in the reports includes the operator's name and address, date of the report, storage of stock, amount of gas/oil processed, and operation statements for plants/refineries. Other data in some reports include amount of oil/gas taken in and sent out, methods of disposal, receipts, companies products were delivered to, treated materials, and amount of stock transported.

Much of the data from reports in this series is summed up annually and published in the annual report of the Oil and Gas Division. This annual report is sent to the Publications Depository.

Monthly refinery reports and some stock reports are described in the series Stock and refinery reports. These reports were filed with old boxes of unscheduled records in the Central Records area. They have similar information to that found on the R-1 and perhaps the G-3 and T-1 forms, dated 1943-1948. These reports have likely not been microfilmed.

Filing operation statements for reclamation plants is regulated by Statewide Rule 57 (16 TAC, �3.57). The rule concerns "the reclamation of tank bottoms and other hydrocarbon wastes generated through activities associated with the exploration, development, and production (including transportation) of crude oil and other waste materials containing oil, as those activities are defined in �3.8(a)(30) of this title (relating to Water Protection)."

Purpose:
Most of the reports serve as monthly account statements of the processing/treatment operations at refineries and reclamation plants. Others record permits issued to operate storage, treatment, or processing facilities. The reclamation plant forms are filed in accordance with Statewide Rule 57 (16 TAC, �3.57).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: By type of record, then alphabetically by either company or county, or by application number.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Monthly report and operations statement for refineries (R-1) - several destruction requests were submitted between March 1686 and April 1997 to destroy paper records dating 1982-1995 after microfilming.

Monthly report for reclaiming and treating plants (R-2) - several destruction requests were submitted between June 1987 and August 1997 to destroy paper records dating 1980-1995 after microfilming.

Nomination for purchase or use of gas (T-3) - several destruction requests were submitted between February 1986 and July 1992 to destroy paper records dating 1984-1992 after microfilming.

Monthly transportation and storage report (T-1) - several destruction requests were submitted between March 1686 and March 1698 to destroy paper records dating 1982-1997 after microfilming.

Pipeline company report of gas exported from Texas (T-6) - several destruction requests were submitted between March 1686 and March 1698 to destroy paper records dating 1985-1996 after microfilming.

Application for certificate of compliance (R-6) - several destruction requests were submitted between March 1686 and February 1995 to destroy paper records dating 1975-1993 after microfilming.

Pressure maintenance and repressuring plant report (R-7) - several destruction requests were submitted between March 1686 and March 1698 to destroy paper records dating 1983-1994, 1996 after microfilming.

Carbon black plant report (C-1) - several destruction requests were submitted between March 1686 and March 1698 to destroy paper records dating 1984-1994, 1996 after microfilming.

Application for permit to operate a carbon black plant (C-2) - a destruction request was approved in November 1990 to destroy paper records dating 1988-1989 after microfilming.

Carbon black plants, defunct - a destruction request was approved in March 1686 to destroy paper records after microfilming, date of records was not given.

Gas storage reports - a destruction request was approved in March 1686 to destroy paper records dating 1982-1983 after microfilming.

Monthly report for gas processing plants (R-3) - several destruction requests were submitted between March 1686 and November 1997 to destroy paper records dating 1980, 1982-1996 after microfilming.

Casinghead connections - several destruction requests were submitted between August 1986 and June 1993 to destroy paper records dating 1985-1991 after microfilming.

Gas cycling report (G-9) - several destruction requests were submitted between December 1986 and June 1996 to destroy paper records dating 1964, 1979-1996 after microfilming.

Certificate of compliance, refineries/gasoline plants (R-5) - several destruction requests were submitted between December 1986 and March 1698 to destroy paper records dating 1975-1994, 1996 after microfilming.

Publications based on records:
Data from most of the plants and refinery reports is summed up annually and published in Oil and Gas Division Annual Report. Refinery operation data is also summarized in a monthly publication titled Recapitulation of Refinery Operations.

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Plants/refinery reports
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.035
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
Oil and Gas Division Annual Report, 1935-1936, 1939-1973.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:
Oil and Gas Annual Report, 1935-1936, 1939-1996
Recapitulation of Refinery Operations, January-February, 1989; January-February, 1990.

Gaps: Possibly in some series of reports, but likely all the reports are present.

Appraisal decision:
The plants and refinery reports concern the operation of various plants and refineries, including monthly statements of what was processed in refineries and reclamation plants, permits to operate plants, storage and transportation of products to and from plants, etc. Much, if not most, of the data in the reports is summarized and published in the annual report of the Oil and Gas Division providing sufficient archival documentation. The agency feels the need to keep most of these reports permanently or at least 100 years because of environmental concerns and the administrative value of processing/treatment operations, etc., in refineries and reclamation plants. This series has been appraised to be non-archival. Since the series does not contain an archival code no changes need to be made to the retention schedule.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
P-18: Skim oil/condensate report

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Production Services

Contacts: Bob Meyer, 463-6975

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: less than one cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
Original paper record is microfilmed monthly. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed. Dates covered are 1968-[ongoing]. Files consist of 183 rolls of microfilm and six cubic feet of paper records. Microfilm master is maintained at the State Records Center. Paper records and a duplicate set of microfilm are kept in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. The series has a retention period of 100 years.

Description:
This series consists of a report (form P-18) filed by operators of facilities that recover hydrocarbons (oil and/or condensate) from salt water gathering systems prior to injection or other disposal of the water. Before salt water is injected into an area where liquid hydrocarbons are stored, any oil or condensate is skimmed out of the tank and sold. The P-18 is required of facilities that serve more than one oil lease or gas unit. Dates covered are 1968-[ongoing]. This report provides the monthly number of barrels skimmed, what wells the oil/condenstate was allocated to, and it gives the name and location of the injection system or facility. The reports are filed in both the state and the appropriate district offices. According to the agency, these monthly reports are summarized in the annual report of the Oil and Gas Division. This annual report is sent to the Publications Depository.

Related series are H-1: Application to inject fluid into a reservoir productive of oil or gas (denied) (4.037) and H-1A: Injection well data for H-1 application (denied) (4.039), applications to skim the oil/condensate through a water injection process.

The skim oil/condensate reports have long-term administrative value for the agency in carrying on its role of environmental protection. The injection process is carried out underground, where oil/condensate is stored. There is a always a possibility of salt water leaching into fresh water wells and these reports can be used to track when the injection process occurred if problems develop in fresh water wells or tables.

The filing of the skim oil/condenstate reports is regulated by Statewide Rule 56 (16 TAC, �3.56). The rule concerns the disposition of scrubber oil, skim hydrocarbons, and identifiable liquid hydrocarbon volumes.

Purpose:
The series reports monthly on oil and/or condensate recovered from salt water gathering systems prior to injection or other disposal of water. The information is also used to track the date the injection process occurred in case of fresh water contamination. This process is regulated by Statewide Rule 56 (16 TAC, �3.56).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Chronological by month and year, district, operator.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Skim oil condensate report (P-18) - several destruction requests were submitted between March 1686 and March 1698 to destroy paper records dating 1982-1997 after microfilming.

Publications based on records:
The types and volume of hydrocarbon liquids produced from gas wells and casinghead gas are in the Oil and Gas Division Annual Report.

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: P-18: Skim oil/condensate report
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.036
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
Oil and Gas Division Annual Report, 1935-1936, 1939-1940.

Texas Documents Collection holdings:
Oil and Gas Division Annual Report, 1935-1936, 1939-1996.

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
I agree with the agency that these reports have a long-term administrative value in that they can be used to track when salt water was injected underground during the skimming process in case of fresh water contamination. But, this information is summarized in the annual report of the Oil and Gas Division, which is sufficient documentation of this activity. This series has been appraised to be non-archival. Since the series does not have an archival code no changes need to be made to the retention schedule.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
H-1: Application to inject fluid into a reservoir productive of oil or gas (denied)

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Injection Control

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: 0.5 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
According to the retention schedule, the original paper record is maintained for two years from date of denial. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed. Records in this series have not yet been microfilmed. Dates covered are 1990-[ongoing]. Files consist of 9.5 cubic feet and are maintained in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. The series has a retention period of 100 years.

Description:
These are application packets sent by operators seeking a permit for injecting water (usually salt water) into wells for enhanced recovery of oil or gas (form H-1 and attachments). Dates covered are 1990-[ongoing]. Information on the application includes the operator; field name; lease name; district number; reservoir discovery date; reservoir and fluid data for the entire reservoir (pressure, depth, type of structure, composition, etc.); production history of the reservoir (number of producing wells, date of first well, cumulative oil production, etc.); type of injection project and results expected; and injection data (type of injection fluid, source, number of injection wells and their pattern and spacing, etc.).

Attachments with the applications include a letter from the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) stating the depth of usable ground water; published local notices; well logs and other test data on the wells; a table of wells showing dates drilled and their injection status; plat of the lease showing producing, injection, and offset wells; a map showing the location and depth of all wells of public record within a 1/4 mile radius of the project area; and form H-1A: Injection well data. This latter form is further described in the series H-1A: Injection well data for H1 application (series 4.039).

The injection of fluid into a reservoir to enhance the recovery of oil or gas is regulated by Statewide Rule 46 (16 TAC, �3.46). Operators send copies of the application packet to the surface owner, offset operators (or all operators in a reserve if this is the first injection application filed), and county and city clerks where the well is located in addition to the RRC. Copies are filed in both the state and the appropriate district RRC offices. Any affected person or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held and the application is approved, the application packet becomes part of the hearing record.

This series contains denied application packets only, approved packets and permits are kept in the hearing files, see the series Hearing files (4.011). Dates of the approved permits go back to the 1940s.

Exceptions requested by operators to Statewide Rule 46 can be found in the series Exceptions to statewide rules 9 and 46 (4.045). Another series concerning injection of water into oil and gas areas is W-14: Application to dispose of oil and gas waste by injection into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas (active) (4.041).

The agency maintains the H-1 application files for 100 years in case of oil/gas pollution issues. Another reason to keep the denied permits is in case operators apply again many years later. The RRC wants to have these files to see why the permits were denied. And, these files provide some information about the production history of the reservoir.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to use a water injection system for enhanced recovery of oil or gas, as allowed under Statewide Rule 46 (16 TAC,�3.46).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Alphabetical by operator name.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: H-1: Application to inject fluid into a reservoir productive of oil or gas (denied)
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.037
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: No records prior to 1990.

Appraisal decision:
These packets contain a substantial amount of data about the water injection process for affected reservoirs, along with some production history of the reservoir and other well and test data, and maps of the wells in the area. This series directly relates to the series Hearing files (4.011 and 4.012) since the approved packets and permits are filed in the hearing files. This series has other relationships - H-IA: Injection well data for H-1 application (denied) (4.039); Exceptions to statewide rules 9 and 46 (4.045); W-14: Application to dispose of oil and gas waste by injection into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas (active) (4.041); possibly Oil and gas production reports (4.017) or Oil and gas potential files (4.015); perhaps others.

This series has long-term administrative value for the agency in carrying on its role of environmental protection. The files substantially document the water injection process used in oil/gas production while providing some production history on reservoirs. The agency feels it needs to retain these records permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the water injection process. Because the Railroad Commission is keeping or intends to keep the records permanently, the Archives is not appraising this series at this time. If this function should be discontinued in the future and the records no longer retained by the RRC or an agency performing this function, the Archives will review these files for archival value. Change the retention period to PM. Add an archival code of R to the schedule and the following note in the Remarks column: "Records will be reviewed for archival value by the Library and Archives Commission if the Railroad Commission decides not to maintain the records permanently."

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
H-1A: Injection well data for H1 application (denied)

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Injection Control

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: 1 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
According to the retention schedule, the original paper record is maintained for two years from date of denial. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed. Records in this series have not yet been filmed. Dates covered are 1990-[ongoing]. Files comprise 10 cubic feet and are housed in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. The series has a retention period of 100 years.

Description:
This series contains injection well data (form H-1A). This form is an attachment submitted with the application to use water injection into wells for enhanced recovery of oil or gas (form H-1 and attachments). Dates covered are 1990-[ongoing]. Information provided includes the operator's name, field name, lease name, location, depth to fresh water zone, well number, and well casing and tubing data (for up to three different wells). This form is one of several attachments submitted with form H-1: Application to inject fluid into a reservoir productive of oil or gas (denied) (see series 4.037).

The injection of fluid into a reservoir to enhance the recovery of oil or gas is regulated by Statewide Rule 46 (16 TAC, �3.46). Operators send copies of the application packet (form H1 and attachments) to the surface owner, offset operators (or all operators in a reserve if this was the first injection application filed), and county and city clerks where the well is operated in addition to the RRC. Copies are filed at both state and district RRC offices. Any of these people or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held and the application approved, the application packet becomes part of the hearing record. This series contains injection well data submitted with denied application packets only. Approved application files and permits are kept in the hearing files, see the series Hearing files (4.011 and 4.012). For denied applications, see the series H-1: Application to inject fluid into a reservoir productive of oil or gas (denied) (4.037).

The agency maintains this injection well data for 100 years in case of oil/gas pollution issues. Another reason to keep this injection well data is in case operators apply again many years later. The RRC wants to have these files to see why the applications were denied.

Purpose:
These records provide injection well data submitted with applications to use a water injection system for enhanced recovery of oil or gas as allowed under Statewide Rule 46 (16 TAC, �3.46).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Alphabetical by operator name.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: H-1A: Injection well data for H-1 application (denied)
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.039
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
This series forms an integral part of another series, H-1: Application to inject fluid into a reservoir productive of oil or gas (denied) (4.037). The injection well data forms provide information about the water injection process for affected reservoirs. This series also relates to the series Hearing files (4.011 and 4.012) as approved application files and permits are filed in the hearing files.

This series has long-term administrative value for the agency in carrying on its role of environmental protection. Agency staff said they prefer a retention of PM instead of 100 years. According to the staff, a copy of this form is filed with the H-1 applications and I see little reason to maintain it in a separate series. Other series of applications maintain attachments with the application/permit files. I recommend these attachments be filed with the denied H-1 application files and this series be removed from the schedule. If the agency wishes to retain the attachments separately, then the retention code needs to be changed to PM to match that of the H-1 application series. This series is appraised as non-archival and will not require future a review (as the H-1: series might) since this data is duplicated in the application files.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
W-14: Application to dispose of oil and gas waste by injection into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas (active)

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Injection Control

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: 15 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
Original paper record is retained permanently in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. Dates covered are 1950-[ongoing]. Files comprise 200 cubic feet.

Description:
This is an application packet (form W-14 and attachments), the permit, and a technical review by an engineer for the disposal of oil and gas waste by injection (usually water) into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas. Dates covered are 1950-[ongoing]. Information on the application includes the operator's name and address, field name, lease name, district number, location of well, name and address of surface owner, casing and tubing data, date well was drilled, depth of well, depth to base of deepest fresh water zone, depth to shallowest oil and gas zone, geologic formation, injection interval, injection pressure, source of fluids, etc.

Attachments with the applications include published local notices, well logs and other test data on the wells, a letter from the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) stating that the well will not endanger usable water quality strata, a table of wells showing dates drilled and their injection status, a plat of the lease showing location of the disposal well and lease ownership of offset leases, and a map showing the location and depth of all wells of public record within a 1/4 mile radius of the wellbore with surveys marked.

The disposal of oil and gas waste by injection into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas is regulated by Statewide Rule 9 (16 TAC, �3.9). Operators send copies of the application packet (form W-14 and attachments) to the surface owner, offset operators, and county and city clerks where the well is located in addition to the RRC. Any affected person or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held, additional documentation will be found in the series Hearing files (4.011 and 4.012).

The files in this series are the active permit files; the cancelled permit files can be found in series W14: Cancelled (4.044); the denied permit files are in the series W14: Denied (4.042). Exceptions requested by operators to Statewide Rule 9 can be found in the series Exceptions to statewide rules 9 and 46 (4.045). Annual monitoring reports for permit compliance are in the series H-10: Annual disposal/injection well monitoring report (4.047). Another series concerning the injection of water into oil and gas areas is H-1: Application to inject fluid into a reservoir productive of oil or gas (denied) (4.037).

The permits issued last the life of the well, which could be many years, as a well can be deactivated and be reactivated years later. The agency has stated it needs to maintain these permits permanently in case of oil/gas pollution issues.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to use a water injection system to dispose of oil or gas waste as allowed under Statewide Rule 9 (16 TAC, �3.9).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Numerical by permit number.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: W-14: Application to dispose of oil and gas waste by injection into a porous
formation not productive of oil or gas (active)
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.041
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
These application packets contain data about the water injection process for affected reservoirs, along with well and test data, and maps of the wells in the area. The permits issued last the life of the well, which could be many years, as a well can become deactivated and be reactivated years later. This series also relates to the following series: Exceptions to statewide rules 9 and 46 (4.045), H-1: Application to inject fluid into a reservoir productive of oil or gas (denied) (4.037), Hearing files (4.011 and 4.012), possibly Oil and gas production reports (series 4.017) or Oil and gas potential files (series 4.015), and perhaps others.

This series has long-term administrative value for the agency in carrying on its role of environmental protection. The files substantially document the water injection process used in oil/gas production, provide additional well and test data, and contain maps of other wells in the vicinity. The agency feels it needs to retain the records permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the water injection process. While it is true that the agency will retain the records permanently, they will not be retained under the active permits series designation. Active permit files will eventually be transferred to the cancelled or denied permit files. Therefore, the series of active permits has a retention period of AC (defined in this case as once the permit is cancelled or denied). The Archives will be reviewing the series of denied and cancelled permits for archival value if the RRC decides not to retain those permits permanently.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
W-14: Application to dispose of oil and gas waste by injection into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas (denied)

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Injection Control

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: 1.5 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
According to the retention schedule, the original paper record is maintained for two years then microfilmed. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed. Records in this series have not yet been filmed. Dates covered are 1982-[ongoing]. Files comprise 21.5 cubic feet and are housed in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. The series has a retention period of 100 years.

Description:
This is an application packet (form W-14 and attachments), the permit, and a technical review by an engineer for the disposal of oil and gas waste by injection (usually water) into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas. Dates covered are 1982-[ongoing]. Information on the application includes the operator's name and address, field name, lease name, district number, location of well, name and address of surface owner, casing and tubing data, date well was drilled, depth of well, depth to base of deepest fresh water zone, depth to shallowest oil and gas zone, geologic formation, injection interval, injection pressure, source of fluids, etc.

Attachments with the applications include published local notices, well logs and other test data on the wells, a letter from the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) stating that the well will not endanger usable water quality strata, a table of wells showing dates drilled and their injection status, a plat of the lease showing location of the disposal well and lease ownership of offset leases, and a map showing the location and depth of all wells of public record within a 1/4 mile radius of the wellbore with surveys marked.

The disposal of oil and gas waste by injection into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas is regulated by Statewide Rule 9 (16 TAC, �3.9). Operators send copies of the application packet (form W-14 and attachments) to the surface owner, offset operators, and county and city clerks where the well is located in addition the RRC. Any affected person or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held, additional documentation will be found in the series Hearing files (4.011 and 4.012).

The permits in this series are the denied permits; the active permits can be found in series W-14: Application to dispose of oil and gas waste by injection into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas (active) (4.041); cancelled permits can be found in the series W14: cancelled (4.044). Exceptions requested by operators to Statewide Rule 9 can be found in the series Exceptions to statewide rules 9 and 46 (4.0.45). Another series concerning the injection of water into oil and gas areas is H-1: Application to inject fluid into a reservoir productive of oil or gas (denied) (4.037).

The agency has stated it needs to maintain these files 100 years in case of oil/gas pollution issues. Another reason to keep the denied permits and application files are that operators may apply again many years later and the RRC wants to have the applications and permit files to see why they were denied.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to use a water injection system to dispose of oil or gas waste as allowed under Statewide Rule 9 (16 TAC, �3.9).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Alphabetical by operator name.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: W-14: denied
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.042
Archival code: none
Retention: 100

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: No records prior to 1982.

Appraisal decision:
These packets contain data about the water injection process for affected reservoirs, along with well and test data, and maps of the wells in the area. This series also relates to the following series: Exceptions to statewide rules 9 and 46 (4.045), H-1: Application to inject fluid into a reservoir productive of oil or gas (denied) (4.037), Hearing files (4.011 and 4.012), possibly Oil and gas production reports (4.017) or Oil and gas potential files (4.015), and perhaps others.

This series has long-term administrative value for the agency in carrying on its role of environmental protection. The files substantially document the water injection process used in oil/gas production, provide additional well and test data, and contain maps of other wells in the vicinity. The agency feels it needs to retain these application files permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the water injection process. Because the Railroad Commission is keeping the records permanently, the Archives is not appraising this series at this time. If this function should be discontinued in the future and the records no longer retained by the RRC or an agency performing this function, the Archives will review these files for archival value. Change the retention period to PM. Add an archival code of R to the schedule and the following note in the Remarks column: "Records will be reviewed for archival value by the Library and Archives Commission if the Railroad Commission decides not to maintain the records permanently."

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
W-14: Application to dispose of oil and gas waste by injection into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas (cancelled)

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Injection Control

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: 2 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
According to the retention schedule, the original paper record is maintained for two years then microfilmed. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed. Records in this series have not yet been filmed. Dates covered are 1982-[ongoing]. Files comprise 71 cubic feet and are housed in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. The series has a retention period of 100 years.

Description:
This is an application packet (form W-14 and attachments), the permit, and a technical review by an engineer for the disposal of oil and gas waste by injection (usually water) into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas. Dates covered are 1982-[ongoing]. Information on the application includes the operator's name and address, field name, lease name, district number, location of well, name and address of surface owner, casing and tubing data, date well was drilled, depth of well, depth to base of deepest fresh water zone, depth to shallowest oil and gas zone, geologic formation, injection interval, injection pressure, source of fluids, etc.

Attachments with the applications include published local notices, well logs and other test data on the wells, a letter from the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) stating that the well will not endanger usable water quality strata, a table of wells showing dates drilled and their injection status, a plat of the lease showing location of the disposal well and lease ownership of offset leases, and a map showing the location and depth of all wells of public record within a 1/4 mile radius of the wellbore with surveys marked.

The disposal of oil and gas waste by injection into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas is regulated by Statewide Rule 9 (16 TAC, �3.9). Operators send copies of the application packet (form W-14 and attachments) to the surface owner, offset operators, and county and city clerks where the well is located in addition the RRC. Any affected person or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held, additional documentation will be found in the series Hearing files (4.011 and 4.012).

The permits in this series are the cancelled permits, the active permits can be found in series W-14: Application to dispose of oil and gas waste by injection into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas (active) (4.041); denied permits can be found in the series W14: denied (4.042). Exceptions requested by operators to Statewide Rule 9 can be found in the series Exceptions to statewide rules 9 and 46 (4.0.45). Another series concerning the injection of water into oil and gas areas is H-1: Application to inject fluid into a reservoir productive of oil or gas (denied) (4.037).

The permits issued last the life of the well, which could be many years, as a well can become inactive and be reactivated years later. The permits were cancelled once the well was plugged, at operator request, or they were cancelled administratively by the Railroad Commission.

The agency has stated it also needs to maintain the application files 100 years in case of oil/gas pollution issues. Another reason to keep the cancelled permits and application files are operators may apply again many years later and the RRC wants to have the files to see why they were cancelled.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to use a water injection system to dispose of oil or gas waste as allowed under Statewide Rule 9 (16 TAC, �3.9).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Numerically by permit number.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: W-14: canceled
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.044
Archival code: none
Retention: 100

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: No records prior to 1982.

Appraisal decision:
These packets contain data about the water injection process for affected reservoirs, along with well and test data, and maps of the wells in the area. This series also relates to the following series: Exceptions to statewide rules 9 and 46 (4.045), Hearing files (4.011 and 4.012), H-1: Application to inject fluid into a reservoir productive of oil or gas (denied) (4.037), possibly Oil and gas production reports (series 4.017) or Oil and gas potential files (series 4.015), and perhaps others.

This series has long-term administrative value for the agency in carrying on its role of environmental protection. The files substantially document the water injection process used in oil/gas production, provide additional well and test data, and contain maps of other wells in the vicinity. The agency feels it needs to retain the application files permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the water injection process. Because the Railroad Commission is keeping the records permanently, the Archives is not appraising this series at this time. If this function should be discontinued in the future and the records no longer retained by the RRC or an agency performing this function, the Archives will review these files for archival value. Change the retention period to PM. Add an archival code of R to the schedule and the following note in the Remarks column: "Records will be reviewed for archival value by the Library and Archives Commission if the Railroad Commission decides not to maintain the records permanently."

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Exceptions to statewide rules 9 and 46

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Injection Control

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: 1 cubic foot

Agency holdings:
According to the retention schedule, the original paper record is maintained for two years from exception date then microfilmed. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed. Records in this series have not yet been filmed. The series has a retention period of 100 years. Dates covered are 1982-[ongoing]. Files comprise three cubic feet and are housed in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters.

Description:
These are letters and attachments from well operators requesting exceptions to statewide rules 9 and 46, and approvals or denials by the Railroad Commission. Dates covered are 1982-[ongoing]. Attachments filed may include plats of the well location, wellbore sketches, cement bonding data, sketches of the well, a water analysis, or some completion data on the well, if requested by the RRC.

Statewide Rule 9 (16 TAC, �3.9) regulates the disposal of oil and gas waste by injection into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas. Operators apply for a permit to conduct the injection, see series 4.041, W-14: Application to dispose of oil and gas waste by injection into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas (active). In some cases, operators apply for an exception from parts of this rule, usually after applying for the permit, but sometimes before. Cancelled permit files are in the series W14: cancelled (4.044), denied permit files are in the series W14: denied (4.042). Annual monitoring reports for permit compliance are in the series H-10: Annual disposal/injection well monitoring report (4.047).

Statewide Rule 46 (16 TAC �3.46) regulates the injection of fluid into a reservoir to enhance recovery of oil or gas. Operators apply for a permit to conduct the injection, see series H-1: Application to inject fluid into a reservoir productive or oil or gas (denied) (4.037). Active permit files are found in the series Hearing files (4.011 and 4.012). In some cases, operators apply for an exception from parts of this rule, usually after applying for the permit, but sometimes before. Annual monitoring reports for permit compliance are in the series H-10: Annual disposal/injection well monitoring report (4.047).

The agency is retaining the exception files for 100 years because it needs to keep track of exceptions approved by the RRC. This information is not available in any other series.

Purpose:
Operators apply for exceptions to Statewide Rules 9 and 46 (16 TAC, �3.9 and �3.46).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Numeric by year of exception date.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Exceptions to statewide rules 9 and 46
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.045
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: No records prior to 1982.

Appraisal decision:
The exception files are maintained by the RRC to track exceptions filed to Statewide Rules 9 and 46. There is some data about the well present (maps, drawings, some tests, etc.), but not much. These files have a long retention period because wells can produce for years, be deactivated, and be reactivated, that could result in exceptions being filed years after a file was initially opened on a particular well. Requests for exceptions are fairly routine and do not need permanent documentation, at least not by the Archives. The attachments filed with the requests do provide some minimal data about the well but this should be available elsewhere, most notably in the several injection application series, H-1: Application to inject fluid into a reservoir productive or oil or gas (denied), and W-14: Application to dispose of oil and gas waste by injection into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas (three series - active, denied, and cancelled).

This series has been appraised to be non-archival. Since the series does not contain an archival code no changes need to be made to the retention schedule.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
H-5: Disposal injection well pressure test report

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Injection Control

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: 20 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
The original paper record is kept as long as administratively valuable. The agency intends to scan the old tests, keeping only the latest tests in paper. Dates covered are 1985-[ongoing]. Files comprise 293 cubic feet and are housed in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters.

Description:
These are mechanical integrity test reports (form H-5) of the wellbore for all active and inactive injection and disposal wells permitted. Dates covered are 1985-[ongoing]. Information in the report includes the operator's name and address, field name and number, lease name and number, reason for the test, well status, construction of the well, pressure during the wellbore test, characteristics of injection fluid, and the zone tested. If the test was not witnessed by a RRC representative, then the operator submits the pressure recording chart used during the test with this report. These tests may be conducted for several reasons - to test the well prior to injection, to test after a workover, for the annual test required by the drilling permit, for a five year test required by rule, etc. This test data is not available in any other record series. Some of the data is entered into a database. Copies are filed at the district and state RRC offices. Mechanical integrity tests of brine wells and underground hydrocarbon storage facilities are in the series Mechanical integrity tests (4.082). Mechanical integrity tests of inactive wells more than 25 years old are in the series H-15: Test on an inactive well more than 25 years old, type B: mechanical integrity test (4.093).

Mechanical integrity tests are regulated by Statewide Rules 9 and 46 (16 TAC, �3.9 and �3.46). Statewide Rule 9 (16 TAC, �3.9) regulates the disposal of oil and gas waste by injection into a porous formation not productive of oil or gas. Statewide Rule 46 (16 TAC �3.46) regulates the injection of fluid into a reservoir to enhance recovery of oil or gas.

Purpose:
These document mechanical integrity tests of the wellbore for active and inactive injection and disposal wells permitted to operate in the state, as regulated by Statewide Rules 9 and 46 (16 TAC,�3.9 and �3.46).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: H-5: Disposal injection well pressure test report
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.046
Archival code: none
Retention: AV

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: No records prior to 1985.

Appraisal decision:
These records are routine mechanical integrity tests that are conducted for a variety of reasons. The test data is not available elsewhere, but other pertinent information, for instance, the construction of the well and its status, can be found in other series, such as the Oil and gas potential files (4.015). This series has been appraised to be non-archival. Since the series does not contain an archival code no changes need to be made to the retention schedule.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
P-13: Application of landowner to condition an abandoned well for fresh water production

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Injection Control

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: several inches

Agency holdings:
Original paper record is retained at the agency for five years after the application is approved then microfilmed. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed. Files are dated 1972-[ongoing]. Paper files are dated 1990-[ongoing] and comprise three cubic feet. There are 7 rolls of microfilm, dating 1972-1989. Microfilm master is maintained at the State Records Center. Paper records and a duplicate of the microfilm are kept in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. The series has a retention period of 100 years.

Description:
This series consists of an application packet containing a letter from the landowner, a drawing of the well, and an approval letter from the Railroad Commission concerning the landowner's request to condition an abandoned oil/gas well for fresh water production. Dates covered are 1972-[ongoing]. These records are filed in the county clerk's office and the RRC district office, with a copy forwarded to the RRC state office.

Conditioning an abandoned oil/gas well for fresh water production is regulated by Statewide Rule 14 (16 TAC, �3.14).

The RRC keeps these records for 100 years in case of problems with the well being conditioned for fresh water production.

Purpose:
By these applications landowners seek to condition abandoned oil or gas wells to function as fresh water wells as allowed under Statewide Rule 14 (16 TAC, �3.14).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Chronological by year, then numerically by district.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? Yes

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Application of land owner to condition an abandoned well for fresh water production (P-13) - several destruction requests were submitted between May 1987 and April 1990 to destroy paper records dating 1981-1989 after microfilming.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: P-13: Application of landowner to condition an abandoned well for fresh water
production
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.050
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
This series documents wells that have been changed from oil and gas producing wells to fresh water wells. While the change has a limited value - primarily to the landowner, there could be environmental problems with the wells in the future and these records are a good way to document specifically which wells were conditioned for fresh water. Water wells and water contamination are important issues in Texas, this series touches on each. This series has been appraised to be archival. Add an archival code of A to the retention schedule. The RRC wants to keep these applications for 100 years to track problems, so the retention period can remain as is. There are currently no files in the series eligible for transfer to the Archives.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
H-11: Application for permit to maintain and use a pit (active)

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Waste Management

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: 1 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
Original paper record is currently retained permanently. The agency intends to scan these records. When it does, it will scan the file immediately after a facility is closed/backfilled, then destroy the paper copy. Dates covered are 1985-[ongoing]. Files comprise 119 cubic feet and are housed in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters.

Description:
The records consist of an application packet (form H-11 plus attachments) and the permit issued to an operator to maintain and use a pit to store oil and gas waste. Dates covered are 1985-[ongoing]. Information found on the form includes the operator's name and address, name and address of the surface owner, name of the lease or project, pit location, pit capacity, need for the pit, type of pit, etc. Attachments with the application include a plat of the lease showing the pit location, a county highway map showing the pit location, drawings of the pit, data on the pit lining (if pit is lined), an identification and description of soil or subsoil along the bottom and sides of the pit, engineering drawing of the leak detection system (if pit has one), etc. The RRC may require the operator to submit additional materials, such as geological data, inspection reports, water samples, etc. Some data from the permit is also maintained in an in-house database.

This series contains active permits. Once a permit is no longer active, it is transferred to another series of permits: Commercial H-11: denied/cancelled (4.052), Non-commercial H-11: denied/cancelled (4.053), Commercial H-11: returned/withdrawn (4.054), or Non-commercial H-11: returned/withdrawn (4.055).

Issuing permits to maintain and use a pit to store oil and gas waste is regulated by Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8). The rule concerns protection of ground water from oil and gas operations. Operators send copies of the application packet to the state and district RRC offices and the application to the surface owner and city clerk (if located within city limits). Any affected person or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held, additional materials are found in the hearing files, see the series Hearing files (4.011, 4.012). Applications/permits to landfarm oil and gas waste instead of maintaining it in pits can be found in the series Active landfarming permits (4.056), and series 4.057-4.060, containing denied/cancelled, returned/withdrawn landfarming permits. Permits for a one-time disposal of oil and gas waste can be found in the series Pit minor permits (4.066).

All the H-11 series have a permanent retention period because of the high potential for pollution. The RRC wants to track what was done with the pit, even if a permit was cancelled.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to maintain and use a pit to store oil and gas waste, as allowed under Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Numerically by permit number.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: H-11: Application for permit to maintain and use a pit (active)
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.051
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
This series concerns the application by an operator to maintain and use a pit to store oil and gas waste. There is a significant amount of material about the pit, both on the application and in the attachments accompanying it. This series contains the active permit files.

Denied/cancelled permit files are discussed in the series review H-11: Application for permit to maintain and use a pit (denied/cancelled) (4.052, 4.053). Returned/withdrawn application files are discussed in the series review H-11: Application for permit to maintain and use a pit (returned/withdrawn) (4.054, 4.055). All these series have a permanent retention period because the potential for pollution is high. And, even if a permit is cancelled, the RRC wants to know what was done to the pit.

The agency feels it needs to retain the records permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the storage of oil and gas waste. While it is true that the agency will retain the records permanently, they will not be retained under the active permits series designation. Active permit files will eventually be transferred to the denied/cancelled permit files. Therefore, the series of active permits has a retention period of AC (defined in this case as once the permit is cancelled or denied). The Archives will be reviewing the series of denied/cancelled permits for archival value if the RRC decides not to retain those permits permanently.

The RRC has said it may scan the records and keep the scanned images in place of the originals. If the records are scanned, it will be the responsibility of the Railroad Commission to comply with 13 Texas Administrative Code, Section 6.95 (b), on the Final Disposition of Electronic Records, as follows: "An electronic state record that is an archival record must be maintained by the agency through hardware and software migrations and upgrades as authentic evidence of the state's business in accessible and searchable form, except as otherwise determined by the state archivist." Although this series is not appraised as archival, the scanned active H-11 files would eventually be transferred to the series of denied/cancelled files so the scanned images would need to be maintained electronically as described above.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
H-11: Application for permit to maintain and use pit (denied/cancelled)

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Waste Management

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: less than 1 cubic foot for each type of facility

Agency holdings:
Original paper record is currently retained permanently. The agency intends to scan these records. When it does, it will scan the file immediately after a facility is closed/backfilled, then destroy the paper copy. Dates covered are 1985-[ongoing]. There are six cubic feet of commercial permit files, 39 cubic feet of non-commercial permit files, both are housed in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters.

Description:
The records consist of an application packet (form H-11 plus attachments) and the permit issued to an operator to maintain and use a pit to store oil and gas waste. Dates covered are 1985-[ongoing]. Information found on the form includes the operator's name and address, name and address of the surface owner, name of the lease or project, pit location, pit capacity, need for the pit, type of pit, etc. Attachments with the application include a plat of the lease showing the pit location, a county highway map showing the pit location, drawings of the pit, data on the pit lining (if pit is lined), an identification and description of soil or subsoil along the bottom and sides of pit, engineering drawing of leak detection system (if pit has one), etc. The RRC may require the operator to submit additional materials, such as geological data, inspection reports, water samples, etc. This series review discusses the denied/cancelled permits for commercial and non-commercial facilities (series 4.052, 4.053). Active permits are found in the series H-11: Application for permit to maintain and use a pit (active) (4.051). Returned/withdrawn permits are in the series Commercial H-11: returned/withdrawn (4.054) or Non-commercial H-11: returned/withdrawn (4.055).

Issuing permits to maintain and use a pit to store oil and gas waste is regulated by Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8). The rule concerns the protection of ground water from oil and gas operations. Operators send copies of the application packet to the state and district RRC offices and the application to the surface owner and city clerk (if located within city limits). Any affected person or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held, additional materials are found in the hearing files, see the series Hearing files (4.011, 4.012). Applications/permits to landfarm oil and gas waste instead of maintaining it in pits can be found in the series Active landfarming permits (4.056), and series 4.057-4.060, containing denied/cancelled, returned/withdrawn landfarming permits. Permits for a one-time disposal of oil and gas waste can be found in the series Pit minor permits (4.066).

All the H-11 series have a permanent retention period because of the high potential for pollution. The RRC wants to track what was done with the pit, even if a permit was cancelled.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to maintain and use a pit to store oil and gas waste, as allowed under Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: By type of facility, then numerically by permit number.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Commercial H-11: denied/cancelled
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.052
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Title: Non-commercial H-11: denied/cancelled
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.053
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
These files concern the application by an operator to maintain and use a pit to store oil and gas waste. There is a significant amount of material about the pits, both on the application and in the attachments accompanying it. This series review discusses two series of denied/cancelled application/permit files (4.052, 4.053). Active permit files are in the series H-11: Application for permit to maintain and use a pit (active) (4.051). Returned/withdrawn application files are discussed in the series review H-11: Application for permit to maintain and use a pit (returned/withdrawn) (4.054, 4.055). All these series have a permanent retention period because the potential for pollution is high. And, even if a permit is cancelled, the RRC wants to know what was done to the pit.

I agree that these series of denied/cancelled permit files have long-term administrative value as the files document storage of oil and gas waste that could cause environmental problems years after storage began. The RRC needs to retain these records permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the storage of oil and gas waste. Because the Railroad Commission is keeping the records permanently, the Archives is not appraising these series at this time. If this function should be discontinued in the future and the records no longer retained by the RRC or an agency performing this function, the Archives will review these files for archival value. Retain the retention of PM. Add an archival code of R to the schedule and the following note in the Remarks column: "Records will be reviewed for archival value by the Library and Archives Commission if the Railroad Commission decides not to maintain the records permanently."

These records have potential archival value. The RRC has said it may scan the records and keep the scanned images in place of the originals. If the records are scanned, it will be the responsibility of the Railroad Commission to comply with 13 Texas Administrative Code, Section 6.95 (b), on the Final Disposition of Electronic Records, as follows: "An electronic state record that is an archival record must be maintained by the agency through hardware and software migrations and upgrades as authentic evidence of the state's business in accessible and searchable form, except as otherwise determined by the state archivist."

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
H-11: Application for permit to maintain and use a pit (returned/withdrawn)

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Waste Management

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: less than 1 cubic foot for each type of facility

Agency holdings:
Original paper record is currently retained permanently. The agency intends to scan these records. When it does, it will scan the file immediately after a facility is closed/backfilled, then destroy the paper copy. Dates covered are 1985-[ongoing]. There are two cubic feet of commercial permit files, 23 cubic feet of non-commercial permit files, both are housed in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters.

Description:
The records consist of an application packet (form H-11 plus attachments) and the permit issued to an operator to maintain and use a pit to store oil and gas waste. Dates covered are 1985-[ongoing]. Information found on the form includes the operator's name and address, name and address of the surface owner, name of the lease or project, pit location, pit capacity, need for the pit, type of pit, etc. Attachments with the application include a plat of the lease showing the pit location, a county highway map showing the pit location, drawings of the pit, data on the pit lining (if pit is lined), an identification and description of soil or subsoil along the bottom and sides of pit, engineering drawing of leak detection system (if pit has one), etc. The RRC may require the operator to submit additional materials, such as geological data, inspection reports, water samples, etc. This series review discusses the returned/withdrawn permits for commercial and non-commercial facilities (series 4.054, 4.055). Active permits are found in the series H-11: Application for permit to maintain and use a pit (active) (4.051). Denied/cancelled permits are in the series Commercial H-11: denied/cancelled (4.052) or Non-commercial H-11: denied/cancelled (4.053).

Issuing permits to maintain and use a pit to store oil and gas waste is regulated by Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8). The rule concerns the protection of ground water from oil and gas operations. Operators send copies of the application packet to the state and district RRC offices and the application to the surface owner and city clerk (if located within city limits). Any affected person or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held, additional materials are found in the hearing files, see the series Hearing files (4.011, 4.012). Applications/permits to landfarm oil and gas waste instead of maintaining it in pits can be found in the series Active landfarming permits (4.056), and series 4.057-4.060, containing denied/cancelled, returned/withdrawn landfarming permits. Permits for a one-time disposal of oil and gas waste can be found in the series Pit minor permits (4.066).

All the H-11 series have a permanent retention period because of the high potential for pollution. The RRC wants to track what was done with the pit.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to maintain and use a pit to store oil and gas waste, as allowed under Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: By type of facility, then numerical by permit number.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Commercial H-11: returned/withdrawn
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.054
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Title: Non-commercial H-11: returned/withdrawn
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.055
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
This series concerns the application by an operator to maintain and use a pit to store oil and gas waste. There is a significant amount of material about the pits, both on the application and in the attachments accompanying it. This series review discusses the returned/withdrawn application packets (4.054, 4.055). Active permits are in the series H-11: Application for permit to maintain and use a pit (active) (4.051). Denied/cancelled permits are discussed in the series review H-11: Application for permit to maintain and use a pit (denied/cancelled) (4.052, 4.053). All these series have a permanent retention period because the potential for pollution is high. And, even if a permit is cancelled, the RRC wants to know what was done to the pit.

I agree that these series of returned/withdrawn application files have long-term administrative value for the agency in carrying on its role of environmental protection. The RRC feels it needs to retain these records permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the storage of oil and gas waste. Since these applications were returned or withdrawn, a storage pit was not in operation under these permits. If the application for a permit was resubmitted and approved, it will be in the active files - H-11: Application for permit to maintain and use a pit (active). This series has been appraised to be non-archival. No changes need to be made to the retention schedule.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Active landfarming permits

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Waste Management

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: less than 1 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
Original paper record retained permanently. Dates covered are 1984-[ongoing]. Files comprise 24 cubic feet and are housed in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters.

Description:
These are applications packets and permits to landfarm oil and gas waste from pits instead of backfilling. Dates covered are 1984-[ongoing]. Oil and gas waste can be landfarmed for uses such as tilling or road fill. Information found on the application includes the operator's name and address, name and address of the surface owner, name of the lease or project, pit location, pit capacity, type of pit, what they intended to do with the waste, etc. Attachments with the application may include a plat of the lease showing the pit location, a county highway map showing the pit location, drawings of the pit, an identification and description of soil or subsoil along the bottom and sides of pit, etc. The RRC may require the operator to submit additional materials, such as geological data, inspection reports, water samples, etc. Some information from the files is maintained on an in-house database. Copies of the permits are also kept in the district offices.

These records are very similar to the application packets submitted in the series H-11: Application for permit to maintain and use a pit (active) (4.051), except the oil and gas waste is removed from the pit for landfarming. This series contains active permits. Once a permit is no longer active, it is transferred to another series of permits: Commercial landfarming permits: denied/cancelled (4.057), Non-commercial landfarming permits: denied/cancelled (4.058), Commercial landfarming permits: returned/withdrawn (4.059), or Non-commercial landfarming permits: returned/withdrawn (4.060).

Issuing permits for landfarming is regulated by Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8). The rule concerns the protection of ground water from oil and gas operations. Any affected person or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held, additional materials are found in the hearing files, see the series Hearing files (4.011, 4.012).

Landfarming permits have a permanent retention period because of the high potential for pollution. The RRC wants to track what was done with the waste.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to landfarm oil and gas waste, as allowed under Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Numerically by permit number.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Active landfarming permits
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.056
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
This series concerns the use of oil and gas waste in landfarming. There is a significant amount of material about the pit and what the operator intends to do with the waste, both on the application and in the attachments accompanying it. This series review discusses the active permit files. Denied/cancelled permit files are discussed in the series review Landfarming permits: denied/cancelled (4.057, 4.058). Returned/withdrawn permit files are discussed in the series review Landfarming permits: returned/withdrawn (4.059, 4.060). These series have a permanent or 100 year retention period because the potential for pollution is high.

I agree that this series of active permit files has long-term administrative value for the agency in carrying on its role of environmental protection as the files document use of oil and gas waste that could cause environmental problems years after landfarming was completed. The agency feels it needs to retain the records permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the landfarming process. While it is true that the agency will retain the records permanently, they will not be retained under the active permits series designation. Active permit files will eventually be transferred to the denied/cancelled permit files. Therefore, the series of active permits has a retention period of AC (defined in this case as once the permit is cancelled or denied). The Archives will be reviewing the series of denied/cancelled permits for archival value if the RRC decides not to retain those permits permanently.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Landfarming permits: denied/cancelled

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Waste Management

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: less than 1 cubic ft. for each type of facility

Agency holdings:
Original paper record is currently retained permanently. The agency intends to scan these records. When it does, it will scan the file immediately after a facility is closed/waste removed, then destroy the paper copy. Dates covered are 1984-[ongoing]. There are four cubic feet of commercial permit files, four cubic feet of non-commercial permit files, both are housed in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters.

Description:
These are applications packets and permits to landfarm oil and gas waste from pits instead of backfilling. Dates covered are 1984-[ongoing]. Oil and gas waste can be landfarmed for uses such as tilling or road fill. Information found on the application includes the operator's name and address, name and address of the surface owner, name of the lease or project, pit location, pit capacity, type of pit, what they intended to do with the waste, etc. Attachments with the application may include a plat of the lease showing the pit location, a county highway map showing the pit location, drawings of the pit, an identification and description of soil or subsoil along the bottom and sides of pit, etc. The RRC may require the operator to submit additional materials, such as geological data, inspection reports, water samples, etc. Some information from the files is maintained on an in-house database. Copies of the permits are also kept in the district offices.

These records are very similar to the application packets submitted in the series H-11: Application for permit to maintain and use a pit (active) (4.051), except the oil and gas waste is removed from the pit for landfarming. This series review discusses the denied/cancelled permits for commercial and non-commercial facilities (series 4.057, 4.058). Active permits are in the series Active landfarming permits (4.056). Returned/withdrawn permits are in the series Commercial landfarming permits: returned/withdrawn (4.059) or Non-commercial landfarming permits: returned/withdrawn (4.060).

Issuing permits for landfarming is regulated by Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8). The rule concerns the protection of ground water from oil and gas operations. Any affected person or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held, additional materials are found in the hearing files, see the series Hearing files (4.011, 4.012).

These series have a permanent retention period because of the high potential for pollution. The RRC wants to track what was done with the waste.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to landfarm oil and gas waste, as allowed under Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Numerically by permit number.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Commercial landfarming permits: denied/cancelled
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.057
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Title: Non-commercial landfarming permits: denied/cancelled
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.058
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
These series concern the use of oil and gas waste in landfarming. There is a significant amount of material about the pit and what the operator intends to do with the waste, both on the application and in the attachments accompanying it. This series review discusses the denied/cancelled permit files (4.057, 4.058). Active permits are discussed in the series review Active landfarming permits (4.056). Returned/withdrawn permits are discussed in the series review Landfarming permits: returned/withdrawn (4.059, 4.060). These series have a permanent retention period because the potential for pollution is high. And, even if a permit was cancelled, the RRC wants to know what was done with the waste.

I agree that these series of denied/cancelled permit files have long-term administrative value for the agency in carrying on its role of environmental protection as the files document use of oil and gas waste that could cause environmental problems years after landfarming was completed. The RRC needs to retain these permit files permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the landfarming process. Because the Railroad Commission is keeping the records permanently, the Archives is not appraising these series at this time. If this function should be discontinued in the future and the records no longer retained by the RRC or an agency performing this function, the Archives will review these files for archival value. Retain the retention of PM. Add an archival code of R to the schedule and the following note in the Remarks column: "Records will be reviewed for archival value by the Library and Archives Commission if the Railroad Commission decides not to maintain the records permanently."

These records have potential archival value. The RRC has said it may scan the records and keep the scanned images in place of the originals. If the records are scanned, it will be the responsibility of the Railroad Commission to comply with 13 Texas Administrative Code, Section 6.95 (b), on the Final Disposition of Electronic Records, as follows: "An electronic state record that is an archival record must be maintained by the agency through hardware and software migrations and upgrades as authentic evidence of the state's business in accessible and searchable form, except as otherwise determined by the state archivist."

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Landfarming permits: returned/withdrawn

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Waste Management

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: less than one cubic ft. for each type of facility

Agency holdings:
The original paper commercial application/permit files are currently retained permanently. The agency intends to scan these files. When it does, it will scan the files immediately after a facility is closed/waste removed, then destroy the paper record. Dates covered are 1984-[ongoing]. Files comprise four cubic feet and are housed in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters.

According to the retention schedule the original paper non-commercial permits are microfilmed after the facility is closed/waste removed, with the paper copy then destroyed. Records in this series have not yet been filmed. Dates covered are 1984-[ongoing]. Files comprise four cubic feet and are housed in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. The non-commercial permit files have a 100 year retention period.

Description:
These are applications packets and permits to landfarm oil and gas waste from pits instead of backfilling. Dates covered are 1984-[ongoing]. Oil and gas waste can be landfarmed for uses such as tilling or road fill. Information found on the application includes the operator's name and address, name and address of the surface owner, name of the lease or project, pit location, pit capacity, type of pit, what they intended to do with the waste, etc. Attachments with the application may include a plat of the lease showing the pit location, a county highway map showing the pit location, drawings of the pit, an identification and description of soil or subsoil along the bottom and sides of pit, etc. The RRC may require the operator to submit additional materials, such as geological data, inspection reports, water samples, etc. Some information from the files is maintained on an in-house database. Copies of the permits are also kept in the district offices.

These records are very similar to the application packets submitted in the series H-11: Application for permit to maintain and use a pit (active) (4.051), except the oil and gas waste is removed from the pit for landfarming. This series review discusses the returned/withdrawn permits for commercial and non-commercial facilities (series 4.059, 4.060). Active permits are found in the series Active landfarming permits (4.056). Denied/cancelled permits are described in the series review Commercial landfarming permits: denied/cancelled (4.057) or Non-commercial landfarming permits: denied/cancelled (4.058).

Issuing permits for landfarming is regulated by Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8). The rule concerns the protection of ground water from oil and gas operations. Any affected person or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held, additional materials are found in the hearing files, see the series Hearing files (4.011, 4.012).

These series have either a permanent retention period or 100 year period because of the high potential for pollution. The RRC wants to track what was done with the waste.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to landfarm oil and gas waste, as allowed under Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: By type of facility, then numerically by permit number.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Commercial landfarming permits: returned/withdrawn
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.059
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Title: Non-commercial landfarming permits: returned/withdrawn
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.060
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
This series concerns the use of oil and gas waste in landfarming. There is a significant amount of material about the pit and what the operator intends to do with the waste, both on the application and in the attachments accompanying it. This series review discusses the returned/withdrawn permit files (4.057, 4.058). Active permits are discussed in the series review Active landfarming permits (4.056). Denied/cancelled permits/applications are discussed in the series review Landfarming permits: denied/cancelled (4.057, 4.058). These series have either a permanent or 100 year retention period because the potential for pollution is high. The RRC wants to know what was done with the waste.

I agree that these series of returned/withdrawn applications have long-term administrative value for the agency in carrying on its role of environmental protection. The RRC feels it needs to retain these records permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the landfarming process. Since these applications were returned or withdrawn, landfarming was not carried out under these permits. If the application for a permit was resubmitted and approved, it will be in the active files - Active landfarming permits. This series has been appraised to be non-archival. The only change to the retention schedule will be to replace the retention period for the series Non-commercial landfarming permits: returned/withdrawn with a PM code.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Stationary treatment facilities - active

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Waste Management

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: less than 1 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
Original paper record retained permanently in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. Dates covered are 1985-[ongoing]. Files comprise six cubic feet.

Description:
Each of the files in this series contains a letter with some attachments sent by an operator to the RRC requesting a permit to operate a facility for the treatment and disposal of specified oil and gas wastes, and the permit issued by the agency. Dates covered are 1985-[ongoing]. The letter/attachments identify the operator/facility and explain how it intends to treat the waste. Some information from the permits is maintained in an in-house database. Copies of the permits are also held in the district offices.

This series contains active permits for commercial and non-commercial facilities. Once a permit is no longer active, it is transferred to another series of permits: Commercial stationary treatment facilities: denied/cancelled (4.062), Non-commercial stationary treatment facilities: denied/cancelled (4.063), Commercial stationary treatment facilities: returned/withdrawn (4.064), or Non-commercial stationary treatment facilities: returned/withdrawn (4.065).

Issuing permits to operate stationary treatment facilities is regulated by Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8). The rule concerns the protection of ground water from oil and gas operations. Any affected person or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held, additional materials are found in the hearing files, see the series Hearing files (4.011, 4.012).

This series has a permanent retention period because of the high potential for pollution. The RRC wants to track what was done with the waste.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to operate stationary treatment facilities for oil and gas waste, as allowed under Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Alphabetical by operator/facility.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Stationary treatment facilities: active
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.061
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
This series concerns the treatment of oil and gas waste in stationary facilities. There is some information about the facilities and how the operators intend to treat the waste. This series review discusses the active permit files (4.061). Denied/cancelled permits/applications are discussed in the series review Stationary treatment facilities: denied/cancelled (4.062, 4063). Returned/withdrawn applications are discussed in the series review Stationary treatment facilities: returned/withdrawn (4.064, 4.065). These series have a permanent or 100 year retention period because the potential for pollution is high. And, even if a permit was cancelled, the RRC wants to know what was done with the waste.

The agency feels it needs to retain the records permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the treatment of oil and gas waste. While it is true that the agency will retain the records permanently, they will not be retained under the active permits series designation. Active permit files will eventually be transferred to the denied/cancelled permit files. Therefore, the series of active permits has a retention period of AC (defined in this case as once the permit is cancelled or denied). There is not any archival value in these sets of permit files since the waste was treated at a facility as opposed to storage in a pit, which could have more of an environmental impact. This series has been appraised to be non-archival.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Stationary treatment facilities: denied/cancelled

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Waste Management

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
Original paper record is currently retained permanently. The agency intends to scan these files. When it does, it will scan the file immediately after a facility is closed/waste removed, then destroy the paper copy. Dates covered are 1985-[ongoing]. There is one commercial permit file, one non-commercial permit file, both are housed in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters.

Description:
Each of the files in this series contain a letter with some attachments sent by an operator to the RRC requesting a permit to operate a facility for the treatment and disposal of specified oil and gas wastes, and the permit issued by the agency. Dates covered are 1985-[ongoing]. The letter/attachments identify the operator/facility and explain how it intends to treat the waste. Some information from the permits is maintained in an in-house database. Copies of the permits are also held in the district offices.

This series describes denied/cancelled permit files for commercial and non-commercial facilities. Active permits are found in the series Stationary treatment facilities: active (4.061). Returned and withdrawn permit files are in the series Commercial stationary treatment facilities: returned/withdrawn (4.064) or Non-commercial stationary treatment facilities: returned/withdrawn (4.065).

Issuing permits to operate stationary treatment facilities is regulated by Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8). The rule concerns the protection of ground water from oil and gas operations. Any affected person or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held, additional materials are found in the hearing files, see the series Hearing files (4.011, 4.012).

This series has a permanent retention period because of the high potential for pollution. The RRC wants to track what was done with the waste.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to operate stationary treatment facilities for oil and gas waste, as allowed under Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Alphabetical by operator/facility for each type of facility.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Commercial stationary treatment facilities: denied/cancelled
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.062
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Title: Non-commercial stationary treatment facilities: denied/cancelled
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.063
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
This series concerns the treatment of oil and gas waste in stationary facilities. There is some information about the facilities and how the operators intend to treat the waste. This series review discusses the denied/cancelled permit files (4.062, 4.063). Active permit files are discussed in the series review Stationary treatment facilities: active (4.061). Returned/withdrawn permits are discussed in the series review Stationary treatment facilities: returned/withdrawn (4.064, 4.065). These series have a permanent or 100 year retention period because the potential for pollution is high. And, even if a permit was cancelled, the RRC wants to know what was done with the waste.

I agree that these series of denied/cancelled permit files have long-term administrative value. The RRC needs to retain the permit files permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the treatment of oil and gas waste. There is not any archival value in these sets of permit files since the waste was treated at a facility as opposed to storage in a pit, which could have more of an environmental impact. These series have been appraised to be non-archival. Since these series did not contain archival codes, no changes need to be made to the retention schedule.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Stationary treatment facilities: returned/withdrawn

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Waste Management

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: none presently

Agency holdings:
There are currently no files in this series; files will be added in the future as permit applications are returned or withdrawn. The commercial files have a permanent retention period, the non-commercial files a 100 year retention period.

Description:
This is currently an empty series. When files are added in the future, they will contain similar materials to those in the other stationary treatment application files - a letter with some attachments sent by an operator to the RRC requesting a permit to operate a facility for the treatment and disposal of specified oil and gas wastes, and the permit issued by the agency. The letter/attachments identify the operator/facility and explain how it intends to treat the waste. Some information from the permits is maintained in an in-house database. Copies of the permits are also held in the district offices.

This series describes the returned/withdrawn permit files for commercial and non-commercial facilities. Active permits are found in the series Stationary treatment facilities: active (4.061); denied and cancelled permits are in the series Commercial stationary treatment facilities: denied/cancelled (4.062) or Non-commercial stationary treatment facilities: denied/cancelled (4.063).

Issuing permits to operate stationary treatment facilities is regulated by Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8). The rule concerns the protection of ground water from oil and gas operations. Any affected person or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held, additional materials are found in the hearing files, see the series Hearing files (4.011, 4.012).

These series have either a permanent retention period or 100 year period because of the high potential for pollution. The RRC wants to track what was done with the waste.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to operate stationary treatment facilities for oil and gas waste, as allowed under Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: No records in series at present. Likely the files will be kept alphabetical by operator for each type of facility in accordance with the other permit series.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Commercial stationary treatment facilities: returned/withdrawn
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.064
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Title: Non-commercial stationary treatment facilities: returned/withdrawn
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.065
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: No records are presently in the series.

Appraisal decision:
This is currently an empty series. It is being appraised on the records it will eventually hold. It will hold returned and withdrawn applications for stationary treatment facilities. This series concerns the treatment of oil and gas waste in stationary facilities. There is some information about the facilities and how the operators intend to treat the waste. This series review discusses the returned/withdrawn permit files (4.064, 4.065). Active permits are discussed in the series review Stationary treatment facilities: active (4.061). Denied/cancelled permits are discussed in the series review Stationary treatment facilities: denied/cancelled (4.062, 4063). These series have either a permanent or 100 year retention period because the potential for pollution is high.

Returned/withdrawn permit files can have long-term administrative value. The RRC feels it needs to retain these permit files permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the treatment of oil and gas waste. There is no archival value in these sets of permit files since the waste was treated at a facility as opposed to storage in a pit, which could have more of an environmental impact. Also, since these applications were returned or withdrawn, a treatment facility was not operated under these permits. If the application for a permit was resubmitted and approved, it will be in the active files, Stationary treatment facilities - active. These series have been appraised to be non-archival. The only change to the retention schedule will be to replace the retention period for the series Non-commercial stationary treatment facilities: returned/withdrawn with a PM code.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Pit minor permits

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Waste Management

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: less than one cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
Original paper record retained for two years from the expiration date of the permit then microfilmed. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed. Dates covered are ca. 1987-[ongoing]. Paper files comprise two cubic feet, the number of microfilm reels is unknown. The paper records and a duplicate of the microfilm are in the Central Records area of the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. Microfilm master is maintained at the State Records Center. The series has a retention period of 100 years.

Description:
These are letters from operators to the Railroad Commission requesting permits to dispose of oil and gas waste on a one-time basis. The permits are good for 30 days only. Dates covered are ca. 1987-[ongoing]. Some of this information is maintained in an in-house database.

Issuing single-use permits to dispose of oil and gas waste is regulated by Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8). The rule concerns the protection of ground water from oil and gas operations. Any affected person or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held, additional materials are found in the hearing files, see the series Hearing files (4.011, 4.012). Applications for permits to maintain and use pits for oil and gas waste on a recurring basis can be found in the series H-11: Application for permit to maintain and use a pit (active) (4.051).

This series has a 100 year retention period because of the high potential for pollution. The RRC wants to track what was done with the waste.

Purpose:
Through these requests operators seek single-use permits to dispose of oil and gas waste, as allowed under Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Chronological by permit date.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Pit minor permits
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.066
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: No records present prior to about 1987.

Appraisal decision:
This series concerns single-use permits to dispose of oil and gas waste. The series has a 100 year retention period because the potential for pollution is high. And, even if a permit was cancelled, the RRC wants to know what was done with the waste. I agree that this series has long-term administrative value for the agency. The RRC feels it needs to retain these permit files 100 years in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the treatment of oil and gas waste. There is not any archival value in this set of permit files since it covers a one-time disposal of waste. A 100 year retention at the RRC is more than sufficient for these permit files. This series has been appraised as non-archival. Since it did not contain an archival code no changes need to be made to the retention schedule.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
R-8/active: authority to discharge oil/gas wastes from a gas plant into various disposal sites

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Waste Management

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? Yes
Replaced by: the permit form in series 4.069 - Discharge permits: active

Ongoing record series? No

Agency holdings:
Original paper record retained permanently. Dates covered are 1972-1995. Files comprise one cubic foot and are maintained in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters.

Description:
These are applications (form R-8), attachments, and permits to discharge oil and gas wastes from gas plants into various disposal sites. Dates covered are 1972-1995. The form and/or attachments contain information on how the operator intended to treat the waste before disposal and where the waste would be discharged. Form R-8 was discontinued in late 1995. The discharge permits are now in the series Discharge permits: active (4.069) and Discharge permits: cancelled, denied, withdrawn, expired (4.070). Some of the data from the permits is maintained in an in-house database. Copies of the permits are maintained at the district offices.

Issuing permits to dispose of oil and gas waste from gas plants is regulated by Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8). The rule concerns the protection of ground water from oil and gas operations. Operators send the permit request to the RRC. Any affected person or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held, additional materials are found in the hearing files, see the series Hearing files (4.011, 4.012).

The permit files have a permanent retention period because of the high potential for pollution. The RRC wants to track what was done with the waste.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to discharge oil and gas waste from gas plants into various disposal sites, as allowed under Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Numerically by permit number.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: R-8/active: authority to discharge oil/gas wastes from a gas plant into various disposal sites
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.067
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: It is unknown when the series started, but no records exist prior to 1972. The form comprising part of the series was moved to another series in late 1995.

Appraisal decision:
This series concerns the discharge of oil and gas waste from gas plants. It has some information about the facility and how the operator intended to treat the waste. This series is active permits. Non-active permits are in the series R-8: cancelled, denied, withdrawn and expired (4.068). The current series for these permits is Discharge permits: active (4.069) and Discharge permits: cancelled, denied, withdrawn, expired (4.070). These discharge permits (R-8) have a PM retention period because the potential for pollution is high. And, even if a permit was cancelled, the RRC wants to know what was done with the waste.

The agency feels it needs to retain the records permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the water injection process. While it is true that the agency will retain the records permanently, they will not be retained under the active permits series designation. Active permit files will eventually be transferred to the series Discharge permits: cancelled, denied, withdrawn, expired. Therefore, the series of active permits has a retention period of AC (defined in this case as once the permit is cancelled or denied). The Archives will be reviewing the series of denied and cancelled permits for archival value if the RRC decides not to retain those permits permanently.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
R-8: Cancelled, denied, withdrawn and expired

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Waste Management

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? Yes
Replaced by: the permit form in series 4.070 - Discharge permits: cancelled, denied, withdrawn, expired

Ongoing record series? No

Agency holdings:
According to the retention schedule, the original paper record is retained until the facility is closed, then microfilmed. Once microfilmed the paper copy is destroyed. No records in this series have yet been filmed. Dates covered are 1972-1995. Paper files consist of seven cubic feet and are kept in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. The series has a retention period of 100 years.

Description:
These are applications (form R-8), attachments, and permits to discharge oil and gas wastes from gas plants into various disposal sites. Dates covered are 1972-1995. The form and/or attachments include information on how the operator intended to treat the waste before disposal and where the waste would be discharged. These are the denied, cancelled, withdrawn and expired permits. Active permits (pre-1996 as this form is no longer active) are in the series R-8/active: authority to discharge oil/gas wastes from a gas plant into various disposal sites (4.067).

Form R-8 was discontinued in late 1995. The discharge permits are now in the series Discharge permits: active (4.069) and Discharge permits: cancelled, denied, withdrawn, expired (4.070). Some of the data from the permits is maintained on an in-house database. Copies of the permits are maintained at the district offices.

Issuing permits to dispose of oil and gas waste from gas plants is regulated by Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8). The rule concerns the protection of ground water from oil and gas operations. Operators send the permit request to the RRC. Any affected person or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held, additional materials are found in the hearing files, see the series Hearing files (4.011, 4.012).

The permit files have a 100 year retention period because of the high potential for pollution. The RRC wants to track what was done with the waste.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to discharge oil and gas waste from gas plants into various disposal sites, as allowed under Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Numerically by permit number.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: R-8: cancelled, denied, withdrawn and expired
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.068
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: It is unknown when the series started but no records exist prior to 1972. The form comprising the series was moved to another series in late 1995.

Appraisal decision:
This series concerns the discharge of oil and gas waste from gas plants. It has some information about the facility and how the operator intended to treat the waste. This series contains the denied, cancelled, returned, and expired permits. Active permits (issued pre-1996 when form was discontinued) are in the series R-8/active: authority to discharge oil/gas wastes from a gas plant into various disposal sites (4.067). Current series for these permits are Discharge permits: active (4.069) and Discharge permits: cancelled, denied, withdrawn, expired (4.070).

These discharge permits (R-8) have a 100 year retention period because the potential for pollution is high. And, even if a permit was cancelled, the RRC wants to know what was done with the waste. I agree that this series has long-term administrative value for the agency as the files document discharge of oil and gas waste that could cause environmental problems years after being discharged. As with similar files, the RRC needs to retain these permit files permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the discharge of oil and gas waste. Because the Railroad Commission is keeping the records permanently, the Archives is not appraising this series at this time. If this function should be discontinued in the future and the records no longer retained by the RRC or an agency performing this function, the Archives will review these files for archival value. Change the retention period to PM. Add an archival code of R to the schedule and the following note in the Remarks column: "Records will be reviewed for archival value by the Library and Archives Commission if the Railroad Commission decides not to maintain the records permanently."

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Discharge permits: active

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Waste Management

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: less than one cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
Original paper record retained permanently in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. Dates covered are 1969-[ongoing]. Files comprise six cubic feet.

Description:
These are application packets, and permits issued, requesting authority from the Railroad Commission to discharge oil and gas waste into tidally influenced bodies of water, into the ground, or into open marine waters. Dates covered are 1969-[ongoing]. Materials include the request from the operator, information on how the operator intends to treat the waste before disposal, disposal site for the waste, and a map of the water area affected. This series now also includes reserve pit permits (a defunct series no longer on the schedule), and gas plant permits (series 4.067 and 4.068). Some data from all these files is in an in-house database. The permits in this series are active permits. Copies of permits are also present in the district RRC offices. Non-active permits are in the series Discharge permits: cancelled, denied, withdrawn and expired (4.070). Minor or 30-day discharge permits for permission to discharge water used to test oil and gas pipelines are in the series Discharge minor permits (4.071).

Issuing permits to discharge oil and gas waste into bodies of water is regulated by Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8). The rule concerns the protection of ground water from oil and gas operations. Operators send the permit request to the RRC. Any affected person or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held, additional materials are found in the hearing files, see the series Hearing files (4.011, 4.012).

The permit files have a permanent retention period because of the high potential for pollution. The RRC wants to track what was done with the waste. Even if the permit was cancelled, the RRC must know what happened to the waste.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to discharge oil and gas waste into tidally influenced bodies of water, into the ground, or into open marine water, as allowed under Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Numerical by permit number.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Discharge permits: active
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.069
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None according to the agency.

Appraisal decision:
This series concerns the discharge of oil and gas waste into tidally influenced bodies of water, into the ground, or into open marine water. It has some information about the facility and how the operator intended to treat the waste. This series contains the active permits. Non-active permits are in the series Discharge permits: cancelled, denied, withdrawn and expired (4.070).

The discharge permits have a PM retention period because the potential for pollution is high. And, even if a permit was cancelled, the RRC wants to know what was done with the waste. I agree that this series has long-term administrative value for the agency as the files document discharge of oil and gas waste that could cause environmental problems years after being discharged. The RRC needs to retain these permit files permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the discharge of oil and gas waste. Because the Railroad Commission is keeping the records permanently, the Archives is not appraising this series at this time. If this function should be discontinued in the future and the records no longer retained by the RRC or an agency performing this function, the Archives will review these files for archival value. Retain the retention of PM. Add an archival code of R to the schedule and the following note in the Remarks column: "Records will be reviewed for archival value by the Library and Archives Commission if the Railroad Commission decides not to maintain the records permanently."

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Discharge permits: cancelled, denied, withdrawn and expired

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Waste Management

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: less than one cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
According to the retention schedule the original paper record is retained until the facility is closed, then microfilmed. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed. Records in this series have not yet been filmed. Dates covered are 1969-[ongoing]. Files comprise 12 cubic feet and are housed in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. The series has a retention period of 100 years.

Description:
These are application packets, and permits issued, requesting authority to discharge oil and gas waste into tidally influenced bodies of water, into the ground, or into open marine waters. Dates covered are 1969-[ongoing]. Materials include the request from the operator, information on how the operator intends to treat the waste before disposal, disposal site for the waste, and a map of the water area affected. This series now also includes reserve pit permits (a defunct series no longer on the schedule), and gas plant permits (series 4.067 and 4.068). Some data from all these files is in an in-house database. Copies of permits are also present in the district RRC offices. The permits in this series are non-active permits - cancelled, denied, withdrawn or expired. Active permits are in the series Discharge permits: active (4.069). Minor or 30-day discharge permits for permission to discharge water used to test oil and gas pipelines are in the series Discharge minor permits (4.071).

Issuing permits to discharge oil and gas waste into bodies of water is regulated by Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8). The rule concerns the protection of ground water from oil and gas operations. Operators send the permit request to the RRC. Any affected person or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held, additional materials are found in the hearing files, see the series Hearing files (4.011, 4.012).

The permit files have a 100 year retention period because of the high potential for pollution. The RRC wants to track what was done with the waste. Even if the permit was cancelled, the RRC must know what happened to the waste.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to discharge oil and gas waste into tidally influenced bodies of water, into the ground, or into open marine water, as allowed under Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Numerically by permit number.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Discharge permits: cancelled, denied, withdrawn and expired
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.070
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None according to the agency.

Appraisal decision:
This series concerns the discharge of oil and gas waste into tidally influenced bodies of water, into the ground, or into open marine water. It has some information about the facility and how the operator intended to treat the waste. This series contains the denied, cancelled, returned, and expired permits. Active permits are in the series Discharge permits: active (4.069).

The discharge permits have a 100 year retention period because the potential for pollution is high. And, even if a permit was cancelled, the RRC wants to know what was done with the waste. I agree that this series has long-term administrative value for the agency as the files document discharge of oil and gas waste that could cause environmental problems years after being discharged. As with similar files, the RRC needs to retain these permit files permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the discharge of oil and gas waste. Because the Railroad Commission is keeping the records permanently, the Archives is not appraising this series at this time. If this function should be discontinued in the future and the records no longer retained by the RRC or an agency performing this function, the Archives will review these files for archival value. Change the retention period to PM. Add an archival code of R to the schedule and the following note in the Remarks column: "Records will be reviewed for archival value by the Library and Archives Commission if the Railroad Commission decides not to maintain the records permanently."

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Discharge minor permits

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Waste Management

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: less than one cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
According to the retention schedule the original paper record is retained for two years from the expiration date, then microfilmed. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed. Records in this series have not yet been filmed. Dates covered are 1987-[ongoing]. Files comprise 15 cubic feet and are maintained in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. The series has a retention period of 100 years.

Description:
These are application packets, and permits issued, requesting authority from the Railroad Commission to discharge water used to pressure test new or used oil and gas pipelines. Dates covered are 1987-[ongoing]. Files include the letter requesting the permit, map of the location of the pipeline, and test results of the water to be discharged. These permits are active for 30 days. This series includes all the permits, both active and non-active (cancelled, etc.). Some data from these files is in an in-house database. Copies of permits are also present in the district RRC offices.

Issuing permits to discharge water used in testing oil or gas pipelines is regulated by Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8). The rule concerns the protection of ground water from oil and gas operations. Operators send the permit request to the RRC. Any affected person or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held, additional materials are found in the hearing files, see the series Hearing files (4.011, 4.012).

Additional discharge permits are in the series Discharge permits: active (4.069) and Discharge permits: cancelled, denied, withdrawn and expired (4.070).

The permit files have a 100 year retention period because of the high potential for pollution. The RRC wants to track what was done with this water. Even if the permit was cancelled, the RRC must know what happened to the water.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to discharge water used in pressure testing new or used oil or gas pipelines, as allowed under Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Numerical by permit number.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Discharge minor permits
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.071
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: No records are present prior to 1987.

Appraisal decision:
This series concerns the discharge of water used to pressure test oil and gas pipelines. It does contain a map of the pipeline location and test results of the water used. This series has a 100 year retention period because the potential for pollution is high. And, even if a permit was cancelled, the RRC wants to know what was done with the waste. I agree that this series has long-term administrative value for the agency. The RRC feels it needs to retain these records 100 years in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the discharge of water used to test oil and gas pipelines. I do not see any archival value in this set of permit files since it covers the discharge of water used to test pipelines. These records do not document actions having nearly as large an environmental impact as other records involving the discharge or storage of oil and gas waste. A 100 year retention period at the RRC is sufficient for this series. This series has been appraised as non-archival. Since it did not contain an archival code no changes need to be made to the retention schedule.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Reports, studies and surveys (raw data), fresh water, hazardous waste, gas plants

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Waste Management

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? Yes
Replaced by: none

Ongoing record series? No

Agency holdings:
Original paper record is retained in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters, comprising about nine cubic feet. Records are dated 1991. The agency intends to microfilm these files in the future and destroy the paper copy. The retention period is 100 years.

Description:
These are questionnaires returned from oil/gas producers in 1991 regarding hazardous oil and gas waste generation. The questionnaires include quite a bit of environmental data, the operator's name, type of waste, an analysis of the waste, and where the waste was generated. This study was funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Some of the data was entered into an in-house database. Information from the surveys was also used to create files on individual hazardous waste sites, see the series Hazardous oil and gas waste generators (4.073).

The management of hazardous oil and gas waste is regulated by Statewide Rule 98 (16 TAC, �3.98).

The agency is retaining this data for 100 years because of the environmental data and because hazardous waste generation has a high pollution potential.

Purpose:
Survey of hazardous oil and gas waste producers conducted by the agency in 1991 with U.S. EPA funding.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Alphabetical by operator.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Reports, studies and surveys (raw data), fresh water, hazardous waste, gas plants
Series item number: 1.1.065
Agency item number: 4.072
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
The questionnaires contain environmental data and an analysis of hazardous waste generated in Texas through oil and gas operations. A report was not produced from this data. Some data is in a database. And, some data was used to create individual files on hazardous waste sites in Texas that the agency is keeping permanently. I agree with the agency that there is administrative value in these files due to the large amount of environmental data in the files, especially in conjunction with the series Hazardous oil and gas waste generators (4.073). This value can also be termed as archival value as the files document hazardous oil and gas waste generation that could cause environmental problems years after generation was completed. This series has been appraised to be archival. Add an archival code of A to the retention schedule. The RRC wants to keep the questionnaires for 100 years to monitor for environmental problems, so the retention period can remain as is. There are currently no files in the series eligible for transfer to the Archives. Once transferred, the records will be evaluated further to compare with information found in the series Hazardous oil and gas waste generators.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Hazardous oil and gas waste generators

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Waste Management

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: less than one cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
Original paper record retained permanently in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters, comprising about two cubic feet. Dates covered are 1994-[ongoing].

Description:
These are files on sites that generate hazardous oil and gas waste, dating 1994-[ongoing]. Files include form H-20, correspondence associated with the site, EPA identification numbers, registration information, and EPA forms containing substantial environmental data. Information on form H-20 includes the operator's name and address, site name, EPA ID number, type of site, and transporter data (if an RRC-permitted waste hauler). Some of the data is duplicated in an Excel spreadsheet. Copies are filed in the district offices.

These files were initially established with data from a survey of sites generating hazardous oil and gas waste conducted by the RRC in 1991. See the series Reports, studies and surveys (raw data), fresh water, hazardous waste, gas plants (4.072) for the questionnaires obtained from the producers.

The management of hazardous oil and gas waste is regulated by Statewide Rule 98 (16 TAC, �3.98).

The agency is retaining this data permanently because of the environmental data and because hazardous waste generation has a high pollution potential.

Purpose:
To regulate hazardous waste under Statewide Rule 98 (16 TAC, �3.98), these records include information about individual sites producing hazardous oil and gas waste.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Alphabetical by operator.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Hazardous oil and gas waste generators
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.073
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: These files are based on a survey done in 1991; no files are present for 1992-1993. It is unknown if this series began before 1994.

Appraisal decision:
These files contain substantial environmental data and information about hazardous waste generated in Texas through oil and gas operations. Some data is in an Excel worksheet. I agree with the agency that there is great administrative value in the these records because of the large amount of environmental data, especially in conjunction with the series Reports, studies and surveys (raw data), fresh water, hazardous waste, gas plants (4.072). The RRC needs to retain the records permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring hazardous waste generation. Because the Railroad Commission is keeping the records permanently, the Archives is not appraising this series at this time. If this function should be discontinued in the future and the records no longer retained by the RRC or an agency performing this function, the Archives will review these files for archival value. Retain the retention of PM. Add an archival code of R to the schedule and the following note in the Remarks column: "Records will be reviewed for archival value by the Library and Archives Commission if the Railroad Commission decides not to maintain the records permanently."

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Hauler permits and reports: microformat, expired/cancelled, 1967-1992

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Waste Management

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? Yes
Replaced by: 4.076 for recent expired/cancelled permits

Ongoing record series? No

Agency holdings:
Retained by the agency on microfilm for 100 years. Microfilm master is maintained at the State Records Center, duplicate kept at agency headquarters. Dates covered are 1967-1992. There are 27 rolls of microfilm.

Description:
These are application/permit files for companies to remove salt water from oil and gas sites. Dates covered are 1967-1992. Materials in the files include the application to haul, the hauler's vehicle identification card, a list of vehicles used, statement of the hauler's authority to use an approved disposal or injection system, where the water is to be hauled, and the permit. This series contains expired and cancelled permits through 1992. The current permits include the ability to haul salt water and other oil and gas waste from oil and gas sites. Current permits are in the series Hauler permits and reports: active (4.075), recent expired/cancelled permits are in the series Hauler permits and reports: expired/cancelled (4.076), or they are in the series Hauler permits and reports: cancelled through enforcement (4.077).

Issuing permits to haul salt water from oil and gas sites is regulated by Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8). The rule concerns the protection of ground water from oil and gas operations. Operators send the permit request to the RRC. Any affected person or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held, additional materials can be found in the hearing files, see the series Hearing files (4.011, 4.012).

The hauler permits have a 100 year retention period because of the high potential for pollution. The RRC wants to track what was done with this waste. Even if the permit was cancelled, the RRC must know what happened with the waste.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to haul salt water from oil and gas sites, as allowed under Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Chronological, then alphabetical by operator.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? An index is available at the agency.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Salt water haulers (WH-1 through WH-5 forms) - several destruction requests were submitted between August 1988 and October 1997 to destroy paper records dating 1967-1992 after microfilming.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Hauler permits and reports: microformat, expired/cancelled, 1967-1992
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.074
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None according to the agency.

Appraisal decision:
The hauler permits concern the hauling of salt water from oil and gas sites for disposal. They provide information about the trucks used and where the waste was hauled or deposited. As with other permitting series concerning the disposal of oil and gas waste, the records have administrative value because of the high potential for pollution in these operations and these records document salt water disposal from oil and gas sites. The RRC needs to retain these permit files permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the disposal of salt water. Because the Railroad Commission is keeping the records permanently, the Archives is not appraising this series at this time. If this function should be discontinued in the future and the records no longer retained by the RRC or an agency performing this function, the Archives will review these files for archival value. Change the retention period to PM. Add an archival code of R to the schedule and the following note in the Remarks column: "Records will be reviewed for archival value by the Library and Archives Commission if the Railroad Commission decides not to maintain the records permanently."

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Hauler permits and reports: active

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Waste Management

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: less than one cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
Original paper record retained permanently in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. Dates covered are ca. 1992-[ongoing]. Files comprise 10 cubic feet.

Description:
These are application/permit files for companies to remove salt water or other oil and gas waste from oil and gas sites by any method other than a pipeline. Dates covered are ca. 1992-[ongoing]. Materials in the files include the application to haul, the hauler's vehicle identification card, a list of vehicles used, statement of the hauler's authority to use an approved disposal or injection system, where the waste is to be hauled, and the permit. This series contains active permits. As permits become inactive, they are filed in one of the series of expired/cancelled permits. Older expired or cancelled permits are in the series Hauler permits and reports: microformat, expired/cancelled, 1967-1992 (4.074); recent expired/cancelled permits are in the series Hauler permits and reports: expired/cancelled (4.076); or they are in the series Hauler permits and reports: cancelled through enforcement (4.077).

Issuing permits to haul salt water or other oil and gas waste from oil and gas sites is regulated by Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8). The rule concerns the protection of ground water from oil and gas operations. Operators send the permit request to the RRC. Any affected person or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held, additional materials can be found in the hearing files, see the series Hearing files (4.011, 4.012).

The hauler permits have a permanent retention period because of the high potential for pollution. The RRC wants to track what was done with this waste. Even if the permit was cancelled, the RRC must know what happened with the waste.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to haul oil and gas waste for disposal by any method other than a pipeline, as allowed under Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this particular series. There were destruction requests filed for a related series.

Salt water haulers (WH-1 through WH-5 forms) - several destruction requests were submitted between August 1988 and October 1997 to destroy paper records dating 1967-1992 after microfilming.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Hauler permits and reports: active
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.075
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
The hauler permits concern the hauling of oil and gas waste from oil and gas sites for disposal. They provide information about how the waste was removed and where the waste was hauled to or deposited. As with other permitting series concerning the disposal of oil and gas waste, the records have administrative value because of the high potential for pollution in these operations and these records document the disposal of oil and gas waste from oil and gas sites. The RRC needs to retain these permit files permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the disposal of oil and gas waste.

While it is true that the agency will retain the records permanently, they will not be retained under the active permits series designation. Active permit files will eventually be transferred to the cancelled or expired permit files. Therefore, the series of active permits has a retention period of AC (defined in this case as once the permit is cancelled or denied). The Archives will be reviewing the series of expired and cancelled permits for archival value if the RRC decides not to retain those permits permanently.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Hauler permits and reports: expired/cancelled

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Waste Management

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: less than one cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
This series has a retention period of AC+3. However, the retention schedule states the original paper record is kept for three years then microfilmed. Once microfilmed the paper copy is destroyed. Records in this series have not yet been filmed. Based on other permitting series in this division, the overall retention period is likely 100 years. Dates covered are ca. 1992-[ongoing]. Paper records consist of 30 cubic feet.

Description:
These are application/permit files for companies to remove salt water or other oil and gas waste from oil and gas sites by any method other than a pipeline. Dates covered are ca. 1992-[ongoing]. Materials in the files include the application to haul, the hauler's vehicle identification card, a list of vehicles used, statement of the hauler's authority to use an approved disposal or injection system, where the waste is to be hauled, and the permit. This series contains recently expired/cancelled permit files. Older expired or cancelled permits are in the series Hauler permits and reports: microformat, expired/cancelled, 1967-1992 (4.074); or in the series Hauler permits and reports: cancelled through enforcement (4.077). Active permits are in the series Hauler permits and reports: active (4.075).

Issuing permits to haul salt water or other oil and gas waste from oil and gas sites is regulated by Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8). The rule concerns the protection of ground water from oil and gas operations. Operators send the permit request to the RRC. Any affected person or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held, additional materials can be found in the hearing files, see the series Hearing files (4.011, 4.012).

The agency intends for the hauler permits to have a long retention period because of the high potential for pollution. The RRC must be able to track what was done with this waste. Even if the permit was cancelled, the RRC must know what happened with the waste.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to haul oil and gas waste for disposal by any method other than a pipeline, as allowed under Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this particular series. There were destruction requests filed for a related series.

Salt water haulers (WH-1 through WH-5 forms) - several destruction requests were submitted between August 1988 and October 1997 to destroy paper records dating 1967-1992 after microfilming.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Hauler permits and reports: expired/cancelled
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.076
Archival code: none
Retention: AC+3 (for paper, does not give a time for microfilm, likely has 100 year period)

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
The hauler permits concern the hauling of oil and gas waste from oil and gas sites for disposal. They provide information about how the waste was removed and where the waste was hauled to or deposited. As with other permitting series concerning the disposal of oil and gas waste, the records have administrative value because of the high potential for pollution in these operations and these records document the disposal of oil and gas waste from oil and gas sites. Even is the permit was cancelled, the RRC must be able to track what was done with the waste.

The agency feels it needs to retain the records permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the disposal of oil and gas waste. Because the Railroad Commission is keeping the records permanently, the Archives is not appraising this series at this time. If this function should be discontinued in the future and the records no longer retained by the RRC or an agency performing this function, the Archives will review these files for archival value. Retain the retention PM. Add an archival code of R to the schedule and the following note in the Remarks column: "Records will be reviewed for archival value by the Library and Archives Commission if the Railroad Commission decides not to maintain the records permanently."

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Hauler permits and reports: cancelled through enforcement

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Waste Management

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: none yet

Agency holdings:
There are currently no files in this series; files will be added in the future as permits are cancelled through enforcement.

Description:
This is currently an empty series as no permits have been cancelled through enforcement. When files are added in the future, they will contain similar materials to those in the other application/permit files for companies to remove salt water or other oil and gas waste from oil and gas sites by any method other than a pipeline. Materials in the files will likely include the application to haul, the hauler's vehicle identification card, a list of vehicles used, statement of the hauler's authority to use an approved disposal or injection system, information as to where the water is to be hauled, and the permit. Permits are cancelled for various reasons through enforcement by the Railroad Commission. Older expired or cancelled permits are in the series Hauler permits and reports: microformat, expired/cancelled, 1967-1992 (4.074); recently expired and cancelled permits are in the series Hauler permits and reports: expired/cancelled (4.076). Active permits are in the series Hauler permits and reports: active (4.074).

Issuing permits to haul salt water or other oil and gas waste from oil and gas sites is regulated by Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8). The rule concerns the protection of ground water from oil and gas operations. Operators send the permit request to the RRC. Any affected person or the local government can request a hearing on the application. If a hearing is held, additional materials are found in the hearing files, see the series Hearing files (4.011, 4.012).

The hauler permits have a permanent retention period because of the high potential for pollution. The RRC must be able to track what was done with this waste. Even if the permit was cancelled, the RRC must know what happened with the waste. And, they want to check on haulers in case someone buys waste from a hauler with a permit cancelled through enforcement to see why the permit was cancelled.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to haul oil and gas waste for disposal by any method other than a pipeline, as allowed under Statewide Rule 8 (16 TAC, �3.8).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this particular series. There were destruction requests filed for a related series.

Salt water haulers (WH-1 through WH-5 forms) - several destruction requests were submitted between August 1988 and October 1997 to destroy paper records dating 1967-1992 after microfilming.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Hauler permits and reports: cancelled through enforcement
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.077
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None, there are not currently any records in this series.

Appraisal decision:
This is currently an empty series. It is being appraised on the records it will eventually hold. It was created to hold cancelled permits re: the hauling of oil and gas waste from oil and gas sites for disposal. The permits provide information about how the waste was removed, where the waste was hauled to or deposited, and why a hauler's permit was cancelled by the agency. As with other permitting series concerning the disposal of oil and gas waste, hauler permits have administrative value because of the high potential for pollution in these operations and these records document the disposal of oil and gas waste from oil and gas sites. The RRC needs to retain the cancelled permit files permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the disposal of oil and gas waste. Because the Railroad Commission is keeping the records permanently, the Archives is not appraising this series at this time. If this function should be discontinued in the future and the records no longer retained by the RRC or an agency performing this function, the Archives will review these files for archival value. Retain the retention PM. Add an archival code of R to the schedule and the following note in the Remarks column: "Records will be reviewed for archival value by the Library and Archives Commission if the Railroad Commission decides not to maintain the records permanently."

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Water quality certifications and coastal management program consistency reviews

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Waste Management

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: fractional cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
According to the retention schedule the original paper record is retained for two years from the final review date, then microfilmed. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed. Records in this series have not yet been filmed. The series has a retention period of 100 years. Dates covered are 1997-[ongoing]. Files consist of 0.5 cubic feet and are kept in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters.

Description:
These are water quality reviews done by the Railroad Commission for federal agencies, generally the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or the U.S. Corps of Engineers. Dates covered are 1997-[ongoing]. The process to issue water quality certifications is regulated by Statewide Rule 93 (16 TAC, �3.93) - "A certification issued by the commission, under the authority of the Federal Clean Water Act, �401, that a federal permit that may result in a discharge to waters of the United States is consistent with applicable state and federal water quality laws and regulations." Reviews are requested by federal agencies for projects within the coastal management area of Texas. The reviews are sent to the requesting federal agency and a copy is kept at the Railroad Commission. The reviews are not sent to the Texas Natural Resources Conservation Commission. Rules governing water quality reviews became effective in 1997. Materials in the files include the review request; a copy of the permit application; a map of the proposed site; a description of acreage (for Corps of Engineers projects); copy of the public notice; a list of owners of land adjacent to the site of the proposed activity, and where the activity may result in a discharge to a watercourse other than the Gulf of Mexico or a bay; and the owners of each waterfront tract between the potential discharge point and 1/2 mile downstream of the potential discharge point, except for those waterfront tracts within the corporate limits of an incorporated city, town, or village; a notice of certification; and certifications issued by the RRC.

The process to issue water quality certifications is regulated by Statewide Rule 93 (16 TAC, �3.93). The regional administrator, district engineer, or the permit applicant may submit a request for certification to the commission. The commission may hold a meeting to receive public comment on a request for certification if it finds that such a meeting is in the public interest. If the request is denied by the commission, the applicant may request a hearing from the RRC on the final determination.

The reviews are kept by the agency for 100 years because of environmental concerns.

Purpose:
The RRC conducts water consistency reviews at the request of the U.S. government for projects to be undertaken in the coastal management area of Texas as per Statewide Rule 93 (16 TAC, �3.93).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Chronological

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:
Reviews are also filed with the requesting federal agency, generally the U.S. Corps of Engineers or the Environmental Protection Agency.

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Water quality certifications and coastal management program consistency reviews
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.078
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
These are water quality reviews done for federally permitted projects taking place in the coastal management area of Texas. The process to issue water quality certifications is regulated by Statewide Rule 93 (16 TAC, �3.93) - "A certification issued by the commission, under the authority of the Federal Clean Water Act, �401, that a federal permit that may result in a discharge to waters of the United States is consistent with applicable state and federal water quality laws and regulations." The reviews are sent to the appropriate federal agency and copies of the files are kept at the Railroad Commission. Copies are not sent to TNRCC so the RRC holds the record copy for Texas. These reviews have long-term administrative value and archival value because of a potential for pollution resulting from the project undertaken. Pollution could result years after a project began or was completed. The state needs to be able to track sources for possible water contamination. We are reviewing these files as Texas' record copy without regard to what may be maintained by the federal government.

This series has been appraised as archival. Add an archival code of A to the retention schedule. The RRC feels it needs to keep the records in-house 100 years; I recommend a shorter retention period, perhaps keeping the files 50 years at the agency, then transferring the files to the Archives. As this series began in 1997, there are no files eligible for transfer to the Archives at this time.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
H-4: Application to create, operate and maintain an underground hydrocarbon storage facility

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Hydrocarbon Storage

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: 10 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
Original paper record retained permanently in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. Dates covered are 1972-[ongoing]. Files comprise 200 cubic feet. The agency is considering scanning these files. Once scanned, the paper copy will be destroyed.

Description:
These are application files (form H-4 and attachments) and permits to create, operate and maintain underground hydrocarbon storage facilities. Dates covered are 1972-[ongoing]. The facilities are in underground caverns. Information on the form includes the operator's name and address, lease name, oil and gas lease numbers, field name, location of facility, date the initial authority was granted and special order number granting it, number of cavities in project, cavity name and well number, size and capacity of cavity when fully leached, injection rate and pressure, and a list of underground hydrocarbon storage facilities within a mile of this facility. Attachments include a description of the geology of the site, a drawing of the caverns, a plat of the leases or owned properties adjacent to the proposed facility, step by step well completion procedures including a tabulation of casing and cementing for each cavity well, a description of the cavity development process, a description of abandonment procedures including diagrammatic sketches for plugging wells, a list of the type and composition of liquids to be stored in each cavity, a copy of the public notice, and a letter from the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) stating the depth that usable-quality ground water occurs. The original application packet is filed at agency headquarters; a copy is filed in the appropriate district office. Some of the data from these files is maintained in an in-house database. Mechanical integrity tests on these underground wells are in the series Mechanical integrity tests (4.082). Sonar surveys on these wells are in the series Sonar surveys (4.083).

The creation and operation of underground hydrocarbon storage facilities is regulated by Statewide Rules 95 and 97 (16 TAC, �3.95 and �3.97). Statewide Rule 95 concerns the underground storage of liquid or liquefied hydrocarbons in salt formations. Statewide Rule 97 concerns the underground storage of gas in salt formations. The commission holds public hearings on applications for new storage facilities, but not on applications for expansions of existing facilities unless a protest is filed by an interested party. If a hearing is held, additional materials can be found in the hearing files, see the series Hearing files (4.011, 4.012).

The application/permit files have a permanent retention because of the high potential for pollution. The RRC must track through the years what was stored in these facilities.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to create, operate and maintain underground hydrocarbon storage facilities as allowed under Statewide Rules 95 and 97 (16 TAC, �3.95 and �3.97).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Alphabetical by field.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: H-4: Application to create, operate and maintain an underground hydrocarbon
storage facility
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.079
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
The application files concern the operation of underground hydrocarbon storage facilities. Each file contains a substantial amount of geological and environmental data about the facility's structure and associated area, data about the facility construction, and about what is stored there. I agree with the agency that the application files have a high administrative value for the agency. The RRC needs to retain these permit files permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the use of underground storage facilities. Because the Railroad Commission is keeping the records permanently, the Archives is not appraising this series at this time. If this function should be discontinued in the future and the records no longer retained by the RRC or an agency performing this function, the Archives will review these files for archival value. Retain the retention PM. Add an archival code of R to the schedule and the following note in the Remarks column: "Records will be reviewed for archival value by the Library and Archives Commission if the Railroad Commission decides not to maintain the records permanently."

These records have potential archival value. The RRC has said it may scan the records and keep the scanned images in place of the originals. If the records are scanned, it will be the responsibility of the Railroad Commission to comply with 13 Texas Administrative Code, Section 6.95 (b), on the Final Disposition of Electronic Records, as follows: "An electronic state record that is an archival record must be maintained by the agency through hardware and software migrations and upgrades as authentic evidence of the state's business in accessible and searchable form, except as otherwise determined by the state archivist."

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Brine mining permits

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Hydrocarbon Storage

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: 10 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
Original paper record retained permanently in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. Dates covered are 1985-[ongoing]. Files comprise 166 cubic feet.

Description:
These are applications, attachments, and permits for regulating the mining of brine from underground areas. Dates covered are 1985-[ongoing]. Information in the application packet includes the operator's name and address; proposed uses for the brine mined at the facility; a list of all permits or construction approvals for the facility received or applied for under federal or state environmental programs; a plat showing surface ownership of the tract in question and adjacent tracts; a topographic or similar map showing the facility, surface water, water wells and other wells within 1/4 mile of the facility; a plat showing the oil and gas operators of that tract and adjacent tracts and listing the names of all oil and gas operators in that vicinity; a survey map showing the type, location, and depth of all wells of public record within a 1/4 mile radius of the brine mining injection well that penetrate the salt formation; a letter from the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) stating the depth at which fresh water should be protected; an electric log of the brine mining injection well or a nearby well that identifies the geologic formations between the land surface and the top of the salt formation and the depths at which they occur; a drawing of the surface and subsurface construction details of the brine mining injection well; the proposed maximum daily injection rate and maximum injection pressure; the proposed injection procedure; the proposed mechanical integrity testing procedure; the source of mining water to be used at the facility; and the proposed groundwater monitoring plan. The applications are filed with both the state and district RRC offices. Some of the data is also maintained in an in-house database. Mechanical integrity tests are performed annually on these brine wells, see the series Mechanical integrity tests (4.082).

Issuing permits for brine mining is regulated by Statewide Rule 81 (16 TAC, �3.77). The rule concerns the operation of brine mining injection wells. The Commission may elect to hold a hearing on the application, or a hearing can be requested by others. If a hearing is held, additional materials can be found in the hearing files, see the series Hearing files (4.011, 4.012).

The brine mining permit files have a permanent retention because the potential for pollution is high. The agency needs to be able to track through the years the operation of these mines.

Purpose:
By these applications operators seek to mine brine from underground areas as allowed under Statewide Rule 81 (16 TAC, �3.77).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Numerical by permit number.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Brine mining permits
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.081
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
These permit files thoroughly document brine mining operations in Texas as regulated by the Railroad Commission. There is a substantial amount of data about the brine mining operations, geologic formations, water wells in the areas, and oil and gas operations in the vicinity. I agree with the RRC that the brine mining permit files have long-term administrative value because of the potential for underground pollution of water tables. The RRC needs to retain these permit files permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the brine mining operations. Because the Railroad Commission is keeping the records permanently, the Archives is not appraising this series at this time. If this function should be discontinued in the future and the records no longer retained by the RRC or an agency performing this function, the Archives will review these files for archival value. Retain the retention PM. Add an archival code of R to the schedule and the following note in the Remarks column: "Records will be reviewed for archival value by the Library and Archives Commission if the Railroad Commission decides not to maintain the records permanently."

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Mechanical integrity tests

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Hydrocarbon Storage

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: 2 cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
Original paper record retained permanently in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. Dates covered are 1982-[ongoing]. The files comprise 84 cubic feet.

Description:
These are mechanical integrity tests performed on brine wells and underground hydrocarbon storage wells. Dates covered are 1982-[ongoing]. Tests are performed every five years on underground hydrocarbon wells, annually for brine wells. Testing is on both active and plugged wells. Test results are submitted to the Railroad Commission. Data from the wells is also maintained in an in-house database. Application/permit files for the underground hydrocarbon and gas wells are in the series H-4: Application to create, operate and maintain an underground hydrocarbon storage facility (4.079). Application/permits files for brine wells are in the series Brine mining permits (4.081). Mechanical integrity tests of disposal/injection wells are in the series H-5: Disposal injection well test report (4.046). Mechanical integrity tests of inactive wells more than 25 years oil are in the series H-15: Test on an inactive well more than 25 years old, type B: mechanical integrity test (4.093).

Mechanical integrity tests for brine wells are in accordance with Statewide Rule 81 (16 TAC, �3.77). The rule concerns the regulation of brine mining injection wells.

Mechanical integrity tests for underground hydrocarbon storage wells are in accordance with Statewide Rules 95 and 97 (16 TAC, �3.95 and �3.97). Statewide Rule 95 regulates the underground storage of liquid or liquefied hydrocarbons in salt formations. Statewide Rule 97 regulates the underground storage of gas in salt formations.

The agency is maintaining the mechanical integrity tests permanently because of the high potential for pollution in these mining/storage operations. The RRC must track the mechanical integrity of these wells over time.

Purpose:
These records document mechanical integrity testing of brine wells in accordance with Statewide Rule 81 (16 TAC, �3.77); and for underground hydrocarbon storage wells in accordance with Statewide Rules 95 and 97 (16 TAC, �3.95 and �3.97).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Numerical by permit number.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Mechanical integrity tests
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.082
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
These records are the tests of the mechanical integrity of brine wells and underground hydrocarbon storage wells. This data is related to series that contain the application packets and permits for operating these wells - H-4: Application to create, operate and maintain an underground hydrocarbon storage facility (4.079) and Brine mining permits (4.081). The records have long-term administrative value in that they can be used to track the mechanical integrity of these wells over time, which can be valuable in pinpointing a time period if problems do arise. There is no archival value in these test results, as they track the mechanical integrity of the well and not the operation of the underground storage wells or brine wells. The RRC feels the need to retain the mechanical integrity tests permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring the mechanical integrity of these wells. This series has been appraised to be non-archival. Since it did not contain an archival code no changes need to be made to the retention schedule.

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Sonar surveys

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Environmental/Hydrocarbon Storage

Contacts: Marty Barnes, 463-6820

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: several inches

Agency holdings:
Original paper record retained permanently in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. Dates covered are 1974-[ongoing]. Files comprise about 5 cubic feet.

Description:
These are sonar surveys conducted inside salt caverns that determine the capacity and geometry of the cavern. Dates covered are 1974-[ongoing]. Underground hydrocarbon storage facilities are located in these caverns. Sonar surveys are conducted prior to the storage of hydrocarbons in these caverns and every ten years thereafter. Application/permit files for operating underground hydrocarbon storage facilities are in the series H-4: Application to create, operate and maintain an underground hydrocarbon storage facility (4.079).

Sonar surveys of salt caverns are required by Statewide Rules 95 and 97 (16 TAC, �3.95 and �3.97). Statewide Rule 95 regulates the underground storage of liquid or liquefied hydrocarbons in salt formations. Statewide Rule 97 regulates the underground storage of gas in salt formations.

The agency is maintaining the sonar surveys permanently because of the high pollution potential in these storage operations. The RRC needs to track the capacity and geometry of these caverns over time.

Purpose:
These records document sonar surveys of salt caverns where liquid hydrocarbons are stored in accordance with Statewide Rule 95 (16 TAC, �3.95); and salt caverns where gas is stored in accordance with Statewide Rule 97 (16 TAC, �3.97).

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: Alphabetical by field and operator.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Sonar surveys
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.083
Archival code: none
Retention: PM

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: None

Appraisal decision:
These records are sonar surveys to determine the capacity of salt caverns and the geometry of these caverns used as underground hydrocarbon storage facilities. This data is related to the series that contain the application packets and permits for operating these facilities - H-4: Application to create, operate and maintain an underground hydrocarbon storage facility (4.079). The surveys have long-term administrative value to track changes in the capacity or geometric makeup of the caverns over time. The RRC needs to retain these surveys permanently in its role of regulating the oil and gas industry and providing a measure of environmental protection by monitoring changes in these caverns. Because the Railroad Commission is keeping the records permanently, the Archives is not appraising this series at this time. If this function should be discontinued in the future and the records no longer retained by the RRC or an agency performing this function, the Archives will review these files for archival value. Retain the retention PM. Add an archival code of R to the schedule and the following note in the Remarks column: "Records will be reviewed for archival value by the Library and Archives Commission if the Railroad Commission decides not to maintain the records permanently."

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Abandoned site candidate

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Site Remediation

Contacts: Jill Edwards, 463-6969

Obsolete record series? No

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: less than one cubic ft.

Agency holdings:
According to the retention schedule, the original paper record is retained for five years after the file is closed, then microfilmed. Once microfilmed, the paper copy is destroyed. Records in this series have not yet been filmed. The agency will eventually microfilm or scan the files. Dates covered are 1991-1996. Files consist of about two cubic feet and include oversize items. Records are housed in the Oil and Gas Division at agency headquarters. The series has a retention period of 100 years.

Description:
These files contain district reports, correspondence, complaints, photographs, plats, analyses, lab reports, consultant reports, etc., concerning cleanups of oil and gas related pollution. Dates covered are 1991-1996. Incidents requiring cleanup include ground water or surface pollution from oil or gas leaks or spills, salt water pollution of ground water, etc. The records generally concern long-term state-funded cleanups where the operator is either unknown or cannot be located thus, the Railroad Commission becomes responsible for the cleanup. When a complaint regarding oil or gas pollution is filed an RRC district office investigates. The district offices are responsible for the investigation and cleanup of the sites. The office evaluates the site and determines what type of cleanup is needed. Outside consultants are often used in this process. The district RRC investigators file periodic reports documenting the cleanup process. Most of the district files are copied and sent to RRC headquarters in Austin, but not all. The record copies of the files remain in the district office. See the series Complaint files/pollution: water well contamination (4.115) for district office files (record copy) regarding the complaint investigations and inspections. See the series D-forms: (pollution/water well contamination) (4.118) for the district files (record copy) regarding the cleanups, both by the RRC and those by operators. The D-forms are reports on the site cleanup. There are no comprehensive final reports at either the state or district offices on cleanups. The series Abandoned site cleanup (4.086) contains bid procedures, invoices, and other financial or contractual records concerning contracting and paying for the cleanups. Files concerning the cleanup of sites by the operators under RRC supervision are in the series Operator/responsible party cleanup files (4.088).

The abandoned site records are maintained for 100 years by the RRC because ground water and surface pollution by oil and gas operations may have environmental impact.

Regulation of oil and gas operations by the Railroad Commission is governed by 16 TAC, Chapter 3.

Purpose:
The records are created in the course of Railroad Commission cleanups of oil and gas polluted sites.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: By date of closure (fiscal year, month), district, then alphabetical by operator name.

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? An index is available at the agency.

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies: None

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Abandoned site candidate
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.085
Archival code: none
Retention: 100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: No records are present later than 1996, but this is an active series.

Appraisal decision:
These files concern cleanups of pollution of ground water and the surface from oil and gas operations - spills, leaks, etc., generally when the operator cannot be located and the RRC assumes responsibility for the cleanup. Because of the high environmental concerns with both the pollution and the thoroughness of the cleanup, these files have long-term administrative and archival value. This series has been appraised as archival. Add an archival code of A to the retention schedule. The RRC feels it needs to keep the records in-house 100 years; I recommend a shorter retention period, perhaps keeping the files 50 years at the agency, then transferring the files to the Archives. There are currently no records eligible for transfer to the Archives. The RRC has said it may scan the records and keep the scanned images in place of the originals. If the records are scanned, it will be the responsibility of the Railroad Commission to comply with 13 Texas Administrative Code, Section 6.95 (b), on the Final Disposition of Electronic Records, as follows: "An electronic state record that is an archival record must be maintained by the agency through hardware and software migrations and upgrades as authentic evidence of the state's business in accessible and searchable form, except as otherwise determined by the state archivist."

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Records Series Review
Series Title:
Coastal facility certification files

Agency: Railroad Commission
Oil and Gas Division - Site Remediation

Contacts: Jill Edwards, 463-6969

Obsolete record series? Yes
Replaced by: none

Ongoing record series? No

Agency holdings:
Currently the agency is retaining copies of original paper records on file in the General Land Office. The series has a retention period of AV+100 years. Exact dates covered are not provided as this series consists of copies of original records and is being removed from the schedule.

Description:
These are application files for certifying coastal facilities involved with oil and gas exploration. Dates covered are likely the 1980s-1990s. Files contain an application letter, a checklist, copy of the facility's disaster response plan, and notes. Files are maintained for current and closed facilities. The RRC responsibility in the process is reviewing the coastal facility's response plan for the General Land Office (GLO). The General Land Office is also involved in this process and it maintains the record copy of the coastal certification files, with the RRC keeping copies.

The agency had initially said they were going to maintain the certification files for 100 years after the application was reviewed for renewal or revision because oil and gas exploration facilities may affect the environment along the Texas coast. Recently, it stated since the GLO holds the original record and the RRC holds only copies, the series will be removed from the schedule.

Regulation of oil and gas operations by the Railroad Commission is governed by 16 TAC, Chapter 3.

Purpose:
These files record the RRC reviews of coastal facilities response plans for the General Land Office as part of the certification/recertification process for coastal facilities involved in oil and gas exploration.

Agency program:
The Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry to prevent the waste of resources and to protect property rights and the environment. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. The Commission licenses and conducts seminars for dealers and their employees. It also oversees: railroad safety and rail planning; surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete.

Four divisions have regulatory functions: the Gas Services Division, the Oil and Gas Division, the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, and the Rail Division. The Office of the General Counsel's Enforcement Section has enforcement powers, and the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division has research and education functions. Support divisions include the Public Information Office, Personnel, Finance and Administration, Information Technology Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, and the Office of Internal Audit. Three elected Commissioners direct the operations of the agency.

Legal authority for the Railroad Commission is the Texas Constitution, Art. X, Sec. 2 and Art. XVI, Sec. 30; and the Natural Resources Code, Chapter 81.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management; and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead. The departments within the Oil and Gas Division are: Administration, Permitting/Production Services, Information Management Services, Environmental Services, Compliance, and the Oil Field Cleanup Operations Unit (including Site Remediation and Special Response, and Well Plugging).

Arrangement: N/A

Access constraints: None

Use constraints: None

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? No

Problems: None

Known related records in other agencies:
The Texas General Land Office maintains the record copy of the coastal facility certification files.

Previous destructions:
Destruction requests on file in the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission were checked for the Railroad Commission and none were found for this series or for equivalent or related series.

Publications based on records: None

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Coastal facility certification files
Series item number: none
Agency item number: 4.087
Archival code: none
Retention: AV+100 years

Archival holdings:
None in the holdings of the Archives and Information Services Division of the Library and Archives Commission.

Texas Documents Collection holdings: None

Gaps: Files are likely not present prior to 1980.

Appraisal decision:
These certification files concern the operation of facilities involved in oil and gas exploration along the Texas coast. The Railroad Commission works with the General Land Office in this process by reviewing the coastal facility response plans. The GLO maintains the record copy of the files. While these are important records, there appears to be little information about the facilities and their operations in these files, plus they are copies of records on file in the GLO. This series has been appraised to be non-archival. According to the staff, this function has recently ceased. Since the files at the RRC are only copies, the agency intends to remove this series from the schedule during the next recertification.

Page last modified: August 31, 2011