Records Appraisal Report:
Texas Department of Transportation
Vehicle Records, Public Relations Records,
and Training Administration Records

Contents of this report
Agency Contact | Agency History | Project Review | Record Series Reviews

Internal links to series reviews
Vehicle Records
Public Relations Records (16 mm film)
Training Administration Records (videotapes, slides, sound slides)


August 2012, Rebecca Romanchuk, Accessions Archivist


Agency Contact

This agency contact information was current at the time of the report but may have changed in the interim. Please call (512-463-5455) for current contact information of the agency's records manager or records liaison for these records.

Texas Department of Motor Vehicles
Dawn Heikkila, Agency RMO/Chief Operating Officer
302-2224

Regina Ignacio
Administrative Assistant
467-3877


Agency History and Structure

Texas Highway Department (1917-1975)
Texas State Department of Highways and Public Transportation (1975-1991)
Texas Department of Transportation (1991-2009)
Texas Department of Motor Vehicles (2009-present)

The Texas (State) Highway Department (merged into the State Department of Highways and Public Transportation in 1975, and merged again into the Texas Department of Transportation in 1991) was responsible from its creation in 1917 for the building and maintenance of the state's roads and highways, and for vehicle registration and the issuing of vehicle license plates. Its governing body was a three-member Highway Commission who appointed the state highway engineer, held public hearings, had the authority to create geographical divisions within the Department, and formulated plans or policies for the location, construction, and maintenance of a comprehensive system of state highways and public roads in cooperation with the counties of the state, or under the direct supervision and control of the State Highway Department.

The Texas Department of Transportation, in cooperation with local and regional officials, is responsible for planning, designing, building, operating and maintaining the state's transportation system. This involves the planning, designing, and right-of-way acquisition of state highways and other modes of transportation, plus transportation research to save lives and money; highway and bridge construction, and airport improvements; the maintenance of roadways, bridges, airports, the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, and ferry systems; public transportation, vehicle titles and registration, vehicle dealer registration, motor carrier registration, traffic safety, traffic information, and auto theft prevention.

The Texas Department of Transportation's governing body is the Texas Transportation Commission, originally composed of three-members, increased to five in 2003 (Senate Bill 409, 78th Texas Legislature, Regular Session). Commissioners are representatives of the general public appointed by the governor with advice and consent of the senate for overlapping six-year terms. Since 2003, one of the members must represent rural Texas. The positions are part-time salaried positions, and the chair (appointed by the governor) was originally called the commissioner of transportation; since 2003, each member is referred to as a commissioner.

The Department of Motor Vehicles (TxDMV) was created by House Bill 3097 (81st Legislature, Regular Session), effective September 1, 2009, and became operational on November 1, 2009. TxDMV is charged with overseeing the state's motor vehicle services that provide consumer protection, assist motor vehicle-related businesses, and raise revenue for the state. Each year the agency registers more than 21 million vehicles, regulates more than 23,000 vehicle dealers, credentials buses and big trucks for intrastate and interstate commerce, and awards grants to law enforcement agencies to reduce vehicle burglaries and thefts. The agency's duties had previously been accomplished by the Vehicle Titles and Registration Division of the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT).

TxDMV is governed by a nine-member board appointed by the governor to six-year terms. By law, board members must include: a county tax assessor-collector, two franchised auto dealers, an independent auto dealer, a representative from the vehicle manufacturing or distribution industry, a representative from the motor carrier industry, a county or city law enforcement representative, and two customer (i.e., public) representatives. The agency's executive director oversees daily operations.

TxDMV has eight divisions: Administrative Services, Financial Services, Vehicle Titles and Registration, Motor Vehicle, Enforcement, Consumer Relations, Motor Carrier, and Auto Burglary and Theft Prevention Authority (governed by its own board). In fiscal year 2012, the agency had a total of 763 full-time equivalent positions and an operating budget of $174,191,700.

(Sources: Guide to Texas State Agencies, 11th edition (2001); An Informal History of the Texas Department of Transportation, Hilton Hagan, 2000; enabling legislation; the TxDMV website; and TSLAC's agency history of the Texas Highway Department.)


Project Review

The TxDMV Vehicle Titling and Registration division called the State Archives on June 8, 2012 with the offer of historical vehicle registration records and training materials, largely dating from the era of the Texas Highway Department and Texas State Department of Highways and Public Transportation, but also extending into the early existence of the Texas Department of Transportation. We accepted the transfer on June 14, 2012, with the mutual understanding that we would appraise the materials, keep what we considered to have archival value, and discard any portion that we deemed without archival value. To determine the correct record series for the vehicle registration data, we contacted the agency RMO's administrative assistant, who said the RMO was unaware of this records transfer to us. After being given the details of the records involved, they did not object to the transfer.

Inventory of the records began on June 22, 2012. Three separate series were identified: vehicle records, public relations records, and training administration records. While only the public relations records series has an archival code (R), portions of the other records appeared to have archival value and research potential. No other sources were found for the information contained in any of the three series, in either original or published form.


Archives Holdings

The State Archives does not hold any records of the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles, or any records of its predecessor agencies that correspond to the three series being appraised.

Previous Destructions

TxDMV uses seven-year retention for vehicle registration data. TSLAC does not have a record of previous destructions for public relations records, though it is likely that destruction has taken place at the agency without notification or involvement of TSLAC. The retention period of the training administration records series and lack of archival code indicates that destruction of those records occurs routinely.

Project outcome

It is recommended that the State Archives accession the vehicle registration records as rare examples of vehicle ownership data in a predominately rural Texas county during the 1930s, and as a sampling of statewide vehicle ownership from 1960 to 1970, none of which information is known to exist elsewhere. The records total less than two cubic feet and are in good condition. If a greater quantity of records was being considered, or if additional similar records were later to be offered for transfer, it is suggested that further justification be made for accessioning, taking into account the region and era represented and the threshold point at which a greater quantity of records provides increasingly statistically duplicative information.

It is recommended that the public relations films be accessioned as unique audiovisual examples of the Highway Department's publicity efforts. This would involve a necessary commitment to appropriate storage and monitoring and eventual reformatting before significant information loss occurs through acetate decay of the film base, which is still in a very early stage. A partnership with the Texas Archive of the Moving Image to digitize the films should occur at the earliest date possible.

Among the training administration records, videotapes in VHS and U-Matic formats are of non-archival topics (retirement preparation, supervisor in-service training seminar) and should be disposed of. Several of the sound slide sets are of subjects with no relation to the Motor Vehicle Division or are of a non-archival nature and can be disposed of. A detailed inventory notes each title and its disposition status. The remaining sound slides have archival value and depict license plate production in the Huntsville and Wynne Texas prison units, and several Motor Vehicle Division programs concerning procedures dealing with license plates, abandoned motor vehicles, and legislation affecting policy and procedures. Although the sound portion of these slides is inaccessible without the needed playback equipment (and reformatting options are unknown), the slide transparencies illustrate the subject on their own with varying degrees of clarity. Slide transparencies, in carousel programs, metal slide cases, and loose, typically have the same purpose as the sound slides, to train personnel in procedures and new policies, and to depict license plate production by the Texas Department of Corrections. One carousel program is expressly about the history of the State Department of Highways and Public Transportation and provides a unique visual version of that history. A 12-page division presentation script with accompanying overhead transparencies on the history of the agency provides a textual complement to this carousel. A portion of the slides are duplicates or depict routine activities not rich in historical content, such as several dozen slides of a reception and meeting of Motor Vehicle Division personnel in about the 1980s. It is recommended that the slides be more fully evaluated at a later time, during processing, to select only non-duplicative slides with research value, which will reduce the bulk amount of the slides.


Record Series Reviews

Records Series Review
Series Title: Vehicle Records

Obsolete record series? No
Replaced by: n/a

Ongoing record series? Yes
Annual accumulation: unknown

Agency holdings: Unknown; this data is now kept in electronic format.

Description:
These records consist of Texas Highway Department vehicle registration records, 1930-1931, 1933-1935, 1960-1970. The 1930s records are three post-bound volumes containing approximately 4,600 individual registrations for Pecos County. Most of the registrations are for passenger motor vehicles and are copies that were kept by the county tax collector or other county official. There is a much smaller quantity of registrations for farm trucks, commercial motor vehicles, trailers, chauffeurs, and dealers. The forms include: old and new license numbers, date, weight, fee paid, make, model, year, engine number, who purchased from and address, owner name and address, county tax collector signature, and the registrar's initial(s).

The 1960-1970 records consist of approximately 19,440 individual registration cards filed by vehicle identification number, representing various cities throughout Texas. Two styles of card contain slightly different information. White cards with blue lines contain VIN, title number, license plate number, make, year, body style, weight, title date, owner name and address, first and second lien holder and date, previous owner, and an index number. Cards with black ground and white lettering (printed from microfilm?) contain make, motor id number or VIN, title number, year, model, body, style, license plate number, carrying capacity, weight, previous owner name and address, owner name and address, first and second lien holder and date, signature of owner, and written on back: new license plate number and date issued.

Purpose: Vehicle registration records maintain vehicle and owner information as legally required by Texas Transportation Code, Chapter 502, for the purpose of taxation.

Agency program:
Texas Highway Department (1917-1975)

These records were created during the existence of the Texas Highway Department, the first predecessor agency that had the function of vehicle registration, which is now one of the functions of the Department of Motor Vehicles. The Texas (State) Highway Department (merged into the State Department of Highways and Public Transportation in 1975, and merged again into the Texas Department of Transportation in 1991) was responsible from its creation in 1917 for the building and maintenance of the state's roads and highways, and for vehicle registration and the issuing of vehicle license plates. Beginning in 1907 (House Bill 93, 30th Texas Legislature, Regular Session), motor vehicle owners have registered their vehicles in their respective counties (now in accordance with Texas Transportation Code, Chapter 502), which provided for a statewide system for the registration of vehicles through the county tax offices. Later, vehicle titles were also issued by those offices. The 254 county tax assessor-collectors act as the Highway Department's designated statutory agents, and the department's Motor Vehicle Division administers the statewide system of fee collection.

Arrangement: The volumes are internally ordered by receipt number, which is chronological. The boxes of individual cards are ordered by vehicle identification number.

Access Constraints: 552.130(a)(2), Confidentiality of Motor Vehicle Records (information is excepted from required public disclosure if the information relates to motor vehicle title or registration issued by an agency of this state or another state or country.) Excepted information includes vehicle identification number and license plate number. See Transportation Code Chapter 730 for excepted personal information types (includes individual’s photograph or computerized image, social security number, driver identification number, name, address (but not the zip code), telephone number, and medical or disability information.) These restrictions do not apply to records created 75 years ago or earlier (552.0215, Right of Access to Certain Information after 75 Years). Therefore, the records dating 1930-1931, 1933-1935 are fully open, while the 1960-1970 records will begin to be fully open starting 2035 and continuing through 2045, depending on the date of creation of each item.

Use Constraints: none

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? Yes.

Problems: None known.

Known related records in other agencies: none

Previous destructions: TxDMV uses seven-year retention for vehicle registration data.

Publications based on records: none

Internet pages based on records: none

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Vehicle records
Series item number: 5.6
Agency item number: 6.1.3
Archival code: none
Retention: LA+3 (Equates to a seven-year retention for vehicle registration data.)

Texas Documents Collection holdings: none

Archival holdings: none

Gaps? Records cover only 1930-1931, 1933-1935, 1960-1970.

Appraisal Decision:
Vehicle registration information is not archival and currently has a seven-year retention at the agency. These records are being considered for accession because of their historical value and research potential, due to the fact that their unexpected survival makes them rare examples of vehicle ownership data of these eras, especially the 1930s when at the beginning of that decade registered vehicles in Texas totaled only 1.4 million, while the state's population stood at 5.8 million. The 1930s records are unrestricted since they were created more than 75 years ago. For the 1960-1970 records, information open to public access is limited to details about the vehicles themselves and lien holder information. All other information is restricted until they become 75 years old, beginning in 2035 and continuing to 2045. The records' relatively small volume is also in their favor.

The level of detail in these records is not found in the (national only, not broken down by state) vehicle registration statistics compiled by the Bureau of Vehicle Statistics (a section of the Research and Innovative Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Transportation), or in similar statistics gathered by independent market research firms. TxDOT compiles vehicle registration statistics by county as number of registrations only, without details of the vehicles themselves, their owners, or lien holders (statistics available online are only for fiscal years 1996-2007). It appears that the detailed information in these records is unavailable elsewhere.

The 1930-1931, 1933-1935 volumes provide specific and statistical information of interest to researchers of vehicle ownership patterns and trends of this relatively early automotive era in Pecos County, a predominately rural and sparsely populated (about 8,000 at that time) county with two cities, Fort Stockton and Iraan, and several unincorporated areas. The records document the early years of the nation's economic Depression as well as regional drought, though the discovery of oil in the county in the late 1920s made Iraan a boom town during the next decade. This changing balance of farm and oil economies may be illustrated in the vehicles registered. The strength of the automobile industry and the rate of vehicle ownership during the Depression are major and under-documented barometers of economic health. The records consist of three post-bound volumes in good condition. The later 1960-1970 registrations are partially restricted until 23-33 years from now. Even in their restricted state they would also provide a similar kind of statistical glimpse as the earlier records, with an important difference. These registrations are for vehicles throughout Texas and are for a limited span of vehicle identification numbers, so they represent a sampling of this information for the entire state, rather than the comprehensive county-level view that the Pecos County volumes do. They are single cards filed in non-standard boxes and would need to be re-housed in shallow archival boxes, or in records storage boxes in such a way so that layers of cards can be removed without risk of disordering them.

It is recommended that the State Archives accession these vehicle registration records as rare examples of vehicle ownership data in a predominately rural Texas county during the 1930s, and as a sampling of statewide vehicle ownership from 1960 to 1970, none of which information is known to exist elsewhere. The records total less than two cubic feet and are in good condition. If a greater quantity of records was being considered, or if additional similar records were later to be offered for transfer, it is suggested that further justification be made for accessioning, taking into account the region and era represented and the threshold point at which a greater quantity of records provides increasingly statistically duplicative information.


Records Series Review
Series Title: Public Relations Records (16 mm film)

Obsolete record series? No.
Replaced by: n/a

Ongoing record series? Yes.
Annual accumulation: unknown

Agency holdings: unknown

Description:
The records are four 16 mm film reels, three of which represent the same title, "The Texas Highway Department presents Your Motor Vehicle Division," 1952. One of those reels is a compilation of spliced cuts, any of which may or may not appear in the work print reel and the master reel. The master reel has an optical sound track while the other two reels have magnetic sound tracks. All are Kodachrome Safety Film and have date codes that confirm that the films are from 1952. They all exhibit some kind of early acetate decay, either with a slight vinegar odor or signs of gelatin emulsion shrinkage. Credits are "Script. Narration. Direction by Motor Vehicle Division" and "Photography by Traffic Services Division."

The fourth reel is titled "Motor Vehicle Registration television spots, 1978" and consists of four color spots with an optical sound track: two 60-second spots for TV 31, and two 30-second spots for TV 32, in English and Spanish. The edge code is S.W.F.L. (Southwest Film Lab, Dallas). The film base is cellulose triacetate and shows no signs of acetate decay.

Purpose: Public relations records were created by the Motor Vehicle Division of the Texas Highway Department, and later the State Department of Highways and Public Transportation, to educate the public and the entities they regulated or served about the Division's policies and programs.

Agency program:
Texas Highway Department (1917-1975)

Texas State Department of Highways and Public Transportation (1975-1991)
These records were created during the existence of two of the Department of Motor Vehicles' predecessor agencies, the State Department of Highways and Public Transportation and the Texas Highway Department. The Texas (State) Highway Department (merged into the State Department of Highways and Public Transportation in 1975, and merged again into the Texas Department of Transportation in 1991) was responsible from its creation in 1917 for the building and maintenance of the state's roads and highways, and for vehicle registration and the issuing of vehicle license plates. Its governing body was a three-member Highway Commission who appointed the state highway engineer, held public hearings, had the authority to create geographical divisions within the Department, and formulated plans or policies for the location, construction, and maintenance of a comprehensive system of state highways and public roads in cooperation with the counties of the state, or under the direct supervision and control of the State Highway Department.

Arrangement: Four individual film reels.

Access Constraints: None known.

Use Constraints: The 16 mm films are inaccessible due to lack of playing equipment but could be reformatted by a vendor. One of the 1952 reels (original cuts reel) has several dozen splices visible and may be difficult to project.

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? Yes.

Problems: The 16 mm films have not been viewed, so the full nature of their content and the integrity of their physical condition are unknown. Signs of acetate decay (vinegar syndrome) are evident with the three 1952 reels. The rate of their decay as measured with A/D Strips from the Image Permanence Institute show that the films register between level 0 (good) and level 1 (fair to good). ISO recommended storage for cellulose triacetate is at 40 degrees Fahrenheit, 30%-50% RH, although optimally these should be kept frozen to extend their life. Reformatting to polyester film (still would require storage at 40 degrees) and/or DVD (68 degrees may be acceptable, 54 degrees meets ISO recommendations) would be necessary to capture the information before the film base degrades further.

Known related records in other agencies: None. The Texas Archive of the Moving Image has similar public relations films of the same era produced by the Texas Department of Public Safety (which took over the State Highway Patrol from the Highway Department in 1935).

Previous destructions: TSLAC does not have a record of previous destructions for this series. It is likely that destruction has taken place at the agency without notification or involvement of TSLAC.

Publications based on records: none

Internet pages based on records: none

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Public Relations Records
Series item number: 1.1.019
Agency item number: 1.19 (TxDMV), ADM21 (TxDOT)
Archival code: R
Retention: 2

Texas Documents Collection holdings: none

Archival holdings: none

Gaps? Records cover only 1952, 1978.

Appraisal Decision:
The 1952 film, "Your Motor Vehicle Division," is probably a rare survival of a Highway Department public relations 16 mm film from this era. The Texas Archive of the Moving Image has similar films produced by the Texas Department of Public Safety from the 1950s that were removed from state custody, likely at the point at which they were going to be discarded. Two work print reels and a cuts reel survive for this title and may enable a full reformatted version to be made. The 16 mm television spots in English and Spanish from 1978 may demonstrate one of the department's early attempts to reach a multilingual audience through that medium. It is recommended that these films be accessioned as unique audiovisual examples of the Highway Department's publicity efforts. This would involve a necessary commitment to appropriate storage and monitoring and eventual reformatting before significant information loss occurs through acetate decay of the film base, which is still in a very early stage. A partnership with the Texas Archive of the Moving Image to digitize the films should occur at the earliest date possible.


Records Series Review
Series Title: Training Administration Records (videotapes, slides, sound slides)

Obsolete record series? No.
Replaced by: n/a

Ongoing record series? Yes.
Annual accumulation: unknown

Agency holdings: unknown

Description:
Three VHS videotapes of a retirement preparation presentation (1993) and ten U-Matic videotapes of a supervisor in-service training seminar (1987) have no archival value and can be disposed of. Fifteen cartridges of up to 36 sound slides each were created in the 1970s and cover various program topics: license plate production and issuance, new registration and licensing policies enacted by state law, and Motor Vehicle Division procedures for specialized vehicles such as dune buggies. Another seven cartridges are programs and generic example slides not created by the agency itself but by the sound slide manufacturer (3M); these are non-records and can be disposed of.

Approximately 2455 35 mm slides, late 1960s-1990, in eight carousels, two metal slide cases, and in small boxes or loose, largely depict Motor Vehicle Division procedures. One carousel concerns the state's Uniform Group Insurance Program and can be disposed of as a non-archival record. The other carousel programs cover training and enforcement of registration and odometer laws, interpretation of national motor vehicle laws, and the history of the State Department of Highways and Public Transportation. A 12-page division presentation script with accompanying overhead transparencies on the history of the agency provides a textual complement to the agency history slide carousel. The metal slide cases contain organized subject sets of slides on division forms and stickers, dealers, commercial vehicles, machines, and Huntsville prison unit license plate manufacture. There is some duplication among slides, especially between the slide programs in carousels and metal cases, and those that are loose. Rather than comparing and disposing of loose duplicates now, it would be more efficient for them to be culled and discarded during processing, given the quantity of item-level comparison that would be required. The amount of duplicate slides will likely total less than 0.25 cubic foot.

Purpose: Training records were developed by the Motor Vehicle Division of the Highway Department, and later the State Department of Highways and Public Transportation, to train employees and entities they regulated or served.

Agency program: Texas Highway Department (1917-1975) Texas State Department of Highways and Public Transportation (1975-1991) Texas Department of Transportation (1991-2009) These records were created during the existence of TxDOT's predecessor agencies, the Texas Department of Transportation, the State Department of Highways and Public Transportation, and the Texas Highway Department. The Texas (State) Highway Department (merged into the State Department of Highways and Public Transportation in 1975, and merged again into the Texas Department of Transportation in 1991) was responsible from its creation in 1917 for the building and maintenance of the state's roads and highways, and for vehicle registration and the issuing of vehicle license plates. Its governing body was a three-member Highway Commission who appointed the state highway engineer, held public hearings, had the authority to create geographical divisions within the Department, and formulated plans or policies for the location, construction, and maintenance of a comprehensive system of state highways and public roads in cooperation with the counties of the state, or under the direct supervision and control of the State Highway Department.

Arrangement: Most slides are ordered in sets, a small percentage are loose or in unlabeled cases. The material as a whole does not have an established arrangement.

Access Constraints: Some slides show faces of TDCJ inmates at Huntsville and Wynne Unit as they work in license plate manufacturing. These are not TDCJ records, so 552.134(1) does not apply (Confidentiality of certain information relating to inmate of Department of Criminal Justice, including department photographs).

Use Constraints: The audio portion of the sound slides is inaccessible due to lack of playing equipment, and it is unknown whether any local vendors are able to reformat them. The U-Matic videotapes are inaccessible for the same reason but could be reformatted by a vendor, although it is recommended they be disposed of as containing information without archival value.

Indexes or finding aids required for/or an aid to access? Yes.

Problems: None now known. The videotapes have not been viewed, so the full nature of their content and integrity of their physical condition is unknown. The videotapes and the sound slide audio diskettes may develop binder hydrolysis (sticky-shed syndrome) resulting in loss of informational content.

Known related records in other agencies:

Texas Department of Corrections photographs, about 1911-about 1985, undated, bulk about 1965-about 1980 [license plate making]

Texas Governor Allan Shivers records, General files (part 2), Auto license plates [unlabeled folder], 1952 [Relevant?]

Texas State Board of Control records, Reports [on cost of manufacturing Texas motor vehicle license plates, 1941-1943]

Texas State Board of Control board members files, Board member R.B. Walthall files, Correspondence re: manufacture of license plates in the State Juvenile Training School or the state prison, 1928; T.B. Warden files, License plates files, 1942-1947

Previous destructions: The retention period of this series and lack of archival code indicates that destruction occurs routinely.

Publications based on records: none

Internet pages based on records: none

Series data from agency schedule:
Title: Training Administration Records
Series item number: 3.3.030
Agency item number: 4.10 (TxDMV; no equivalent series in TxDOT core schedule or Vehicle Titles and Registration Division section of the schedule)
Archival code: none
Retention: US+2

Texas Documents Collection holdings: none

Archival holdings: none

Gaps? Records cover only late 1960s-1993.

Appraisal Decision:
Videotapes in VHS and U-Matic formats are of non-archival topics (retirement preparation, supervisor in-service training seminar) and should be disposed of.

Sound slides depict license plate production in the Huntsville and Wynne Texas prison units, and several Motor Vehicle Division programs concerning procedures dealing with license plates, abandoned motor vehicles, and legislation affecting policy and procedures. Although the sound portion of these slides is inaccessible without the needed playback equipment (and reformatting options are unknown), the slide transparencies illustrate the subject on their own with varying degrees of clarity. Beyond the intended topic, the slides show vehicles used during this era, which would have research value to those interested in automotive history of the state. Several of the sound slide sets are of subjects with no relation to the Motor Vehicle Division and can be disposed of as non-records, while others are of a non-archival nature and can also be disposed of (these are noted in a descriptive inventory.)

Slide transparencies, in carousel programs, metal slide cases, and loose, typically have the same purpose as the sound slides, to train personnel in procedures and new policies, and to depict license plate production by the Texas Department of Corrections. One carousel program is expressly about the history of the State Department of Highways and Public Transportation and provides a unique visual version of that history. A 12-page division presentation script with accompanying overhead transparencies on the history of the agency provides a textual complement to this carousel. A portion of the slides are duplicates or depict routine activities not rich in historical content, such as several dozen slides of a reception and meeting of Motor Vehicle Division personnel in about the 1980s. It is recommended that the slides be more fully evaluated at a later time, during processing, to select only non-duplicative slides with research value, which will reduce the bulk amount of the slides.

Overall, these training administration records in slide transparency format provide an important visual record of the Motor Vehicle Division not yet documented in the State Archives' holdings. They demonstrate the division's efforts to educate their employees in policies and procedures, new legislation affecting vehicle registration, and in division history. Beyond documenting the informational content that the division sought to impart, our archival holdings should reflect the Motor Vehicle Division's choice of medium to communicate that information as a record of how a government agency of the time judged how best to engage their audience, in this case the division's own employees.

 

Page last modified: April 18, 2014