James G. Fanning to Mirabeau B. Lamar, December 3, 1836

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James G. Fanning to Mirabeau B. Lamar, December 1836

New Orleans


Saturday, Dec. 3, 1836

Dr. Sir

Previous to leaving Columbia, I addressed a


note to you, containing my reasons for so doing. We arrived


at New Orleans on the 27th Nov. after a passage of four days.

The affairs of Texas, though still an object of


interest here, do not excite that enthusiasm with which they


were formerly contemplated. It appears as though old Uncle


Sam after relieving the immediate distress of one of his children,


now stands with his hands thrust into his pockets to the elbows,


calmly and attentively surveying the position of the infant


Republic. My own opinion as to the course he will pursue is


formed, and time must determine whether it be correct. The


independence of Texas will be recognized immediately; but a for-


ceful effort will be made, and will prevent its immediate


annexation. Many of the Southern people are opposed to the


measure, as they consider it an unwarrantable interference with


the affairs of Mexico, openly to take under their protection her


refractory daughter—and the states of the North cherish a still


stronger feeling against the measure, as it consequently lessens


their own form by throwing into the Union another slave state.

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James G. Fanning to Mirabeau B. Lamar, December 3, 1836. Mirabeau B. Lamar Papers #499, Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Page last modified: April 5, 2011