The Civil War in Texas: An Exhibit from the Texas State Library and Archives
Before the War 1860: Big Trouble Secession! 1861: Opening Act Dissent
1862: Fiery Trial 1863: The Tide Turns 1864: No Way Out End of the Ordeal Further Reading

Mrs. B.M. Clarke to Governor Pendleton Murrah, November 30, 1863

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Mrs. B.M. Clarke to Governor Pendleton Murrah, November 1863

he speaks of sending or being able to send letters across
the line[.] [T]hese letters I assure you was [sic] never sent
but some year and a half or two years ago[.] [H]e did
write and send a letter to his brother in the North[,]
which letter I read[.] [I]t was written in regard to
my brother Jared E Geece, who was at that time and
is still a member of our Cousin Gen John A Wharton’s
Staff[.] [T]he letter was, that if Jared Geece, should be so
unfortunate as to be taken prisoner and sent North
by the Feds, our father requested his brother to
spare no pains in trying to find out where my
brother was and to do all in his power to administer
to his comforts and wants[.] [T]his was the subject of
his letter, and I do assure you on the honor of
a lady there was not one word of war news written,
nor one word against our Confederacy[.] [H]e has never
sent any other letter out of the Confederacy[.]

My Father was a Union Man; but seldom discussed
the subject for all of his friends were in opposition
to him, until he formed this unfortunate
acquaintance of Mr Baldwin[.] Pa’s friends
tried to warn him about this man, but he

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Mrs. B.M. Clarke to Governor Pendleton Murrah, November 30, 1863. Records of Governor Pendleton Murrah, Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Page last modified: August 25, 2011