The Civil War in Texas: An Exhibit from the Texas State Library and Archives
Before the War 1860: Big Trouble Secession! 1861: Opening Act Dissent
1862: Fiery Trial 1863: The Tide Turns 1864: No Way Out End of the Ordeal Further Reading

Mrs. B.M. Clarke to Governor Pendleton Murrah, November 30, 1863

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Mrs. B.M. Clarke to Governor Pendleton Murrah, November 1863

felt so confident that he was a good man[,] that
nothing bad could be hid behind so smiling a
face, but alas such a friend, as he proved himself
a snake in the grass[.] [H]e had nothing to loose [sic]
neither reputation, position, or friends, while our
all was at stake[.] Dr P. has friends[,] all who
know him well, know him to be a gentleman,
of refined feelings and a man of heart[.] My Mother
was a widow when he married her[.] [S]he was Mrs Jared E Geece
[and] had but two children, myself and brother[.] [W]e were small
and I a very delicate child[.] [T]his stepfather minded
me tenderly, devotedly[.] [H]e indulged me even more
than my own father would have done, and now I
am willing to do anything on earth to save him.
My husband[,] a native of South Carolina, has ever been
the warmest of Secessionist[s][.] [H]e is indeed proud of his
Nation State to feel and know she has borne such an
active and nob[l]e part in our Struggle for freedom and
Independence. Gov Murrah is it asking too much
of you to beg you to be lenient with our father.
[H]e has nine children, and a devoted wife, who
ask for kindness[.] I beg you will grant it[.] I am

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Mrs. B.M. Clarke to Governor Pendleton Murrah, November 30, 1863. Records of Governor Pendleton Murrah, Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Page last modified: August 25, 2011