Indian Relations in Texas

Randolph Marcy and Robert S. Neighbors to Peter Hansborough Bell, September 30, 1854

Page 3

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Randolph Marcy and Robert S. Neighbors to Peter Hansborough Bell, September 1854

wagon train as high as we found good water
sufficient for the escort and animals, when we
were obliged to leave the greater portion of
the command, while with a small mounted
escort we pushed rapidly forward to the
sources of the river. In the course of our
march we visited the locality alluded to
in our instructions from the Department of
the Interior, at the points where the Big Wichita
and the Brazos Rivers approach nearest to
each other. We found upon the South Side
of the Brazos opposite this point a
desirable tract of land, but it is not
vacant.

There are spots in the valley of the main
trunk of the Big Wichita where the soil is
good but the adjacent country upon both sides
is very elevated, sterile, and much broken up
with deep ravines with precipitous rocky
sides, and with the exception of a stunted
growth of cedar upon the hills and a narrow
fringe of cotton wood along the banks of the
river it is totally destitute of woodland.

This river has its origin in a locality
of great elevation (the barometer indicating
an altitude of two thousand two hundred
feet above the sea) and flows for about a
hundred miles through an extensive field
of gypsum which imparts to the water

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Randolph Marcy and Robert S. Neighbors to Peter Hansborough Bell, September 30, 1854. Texas Indian Papers, Volume 3, #125, Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Page last modified: September 30, 2011