Indian Relations in Texas

Randolph Marcy and Robert S. Neighbors to Peter Hansborough Bell, September 30, 1854

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Randolph Marcy and Robert S. Neighbors to Peter Hansborough Bell, September 1854

an acrid and nauseating taste, throughout
its entire course to its confluence with
Red River, thereby rendering this section wholly
unsuited to agricultural purposes, and
indeed almost uninhabitable.

From the head waters of the Big
Wichita our course was south for twenty
miles, when we struck the principal or Salt
Fork of the Brazos River Which we ascended
to a point about twenty five miles from
its source.

We found the river composed of
three principal branches all having their
sources in a very broken and mountainous
region, and in their course passing
through the gypsum formation before
mentioned and the waters of all having
the unpalatable properties peculiar to
the presence of that mineral.

The soil near the headwaters of this
stream (east of the mountains) is in many
places of good quality, but the great
scarcity of timber and good water render
it unfit for farming purposes.

This character obtains for about
one hundred and twenty miles from the
sources of the river, below which several
points were observed where good locations
might have been made, but all the

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Randolph Marcy and Robert S. Neighbors to Peter Hansborough Bell, September 30, 1854. Texas Indian Papers, Volume 3, #125, Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Page last modified: September 30, 2011