Indian Relations in Texas

Felix Huston to Branch Archer, August 12, 1840

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Felix Huston to Branch Archer, August 12, 1840

they occupied) their lines extending nearly
a quarter of a mile into the prairie. I dis-
mounted my men, and a handsome fire was
opened--the Indian chiefs cavorting aro-
und in splendid style, on front and flank, finely
mounted, and dressed in all the splendor of
Comanche warfare; at this time several
Indians fell from their horses, and we had
three or four men wounded. Finding
that the Indians were disposed to keep
at a distance, and that a large body
was assembled in the woods, I ordered Col.
Burleson, with the right wing, to move aro-
und the point of woods, and Captain
Caldwell, with the left wing, to charge into
the woods; which movements were execu-
ted in gallant style. The Indians did not
stand the charge, and fled at all points:
from that time there was
a warm and spirited pursuit for 15 miles;
the Indians scattered, mostly abandon-
ing their horses and taking to the thickets.
Nothing could exceed the animation
of the men, and the cool and steady man-
ner in which they would dismount
and deliver their fire. Upwards of forty
Indians were killed. Two prisoners (a squaw
and child) taken; and we have taken upwards
of two hundred horses and mules, many of them
heavily packed with the plunder of Linn-
ville and the lower country. There is

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Felix Huston to Branch Archer, August 12, 1840. Andrew Jackson Houston Papers #1966, Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Page last modified: October 3, 2011