Indian Relations in Texas

Thomas G. Western to J.C. Neill, Edwin Morehouse, and Thomas Smith, September 8, 1845

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Thomas G. Western to J.C. Neill, Edwin Morehouse, and Thomas Smith, September 1845

We have no present use for that section of the Country
best adapted to Hunting purposes, the Buffalo
range; the President is therefore of the opinion
that there will be little difficulty to be ap-
prehended in adjusting the Boundary line
to suit all parties. Whenever the Indians make
Known their desires to the Government.

The President loves the Red Man, as brothers, and
is desirous that the Buffalo range should be
preserved for their use that they may never
want meat, nor their women and children
suffer from hunger.

The great impropriety of
interfering with the line at this particular
Juncture of affairs need not be pointed out to
gentlemen of your intelligence and discretion.
Whether we become annexed or remain Indepen-
dent, it is equally objectionable, if the former,
the state as it were would be meddling with
a matter purely national, a matter with which
none have a right to interfere but the Government
of the US; and if the latter, it would be di-
vesting Texas of a large and fair portion of her
Territory without a fair equivalent, and
without any reason therefore, which could
not or would be satisfactory to the people of Texas.

The foregoing are the instructions
which the President has desired me to com-
municate to you for your guidance and
observance, as Indian Commissioners to the
present council, His Excellency desires
me to say that he has full confidence in
your intelligence prudence and discretion
and feels assured that these qualifications
will produce a report of your proceedings

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Thomas G. Western to J.C. Neill, Edwin Morehouse, and Thomas Smith, September 8, 1845. Texas Indian Papers, Volume 2, #313, Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Page last modified: October 3, 2011