Previous Lobby Exhibit

The American Civil War: The Galveston Garrison Flag

 (from top to bottom) red, white and red with a navy blue canton containing seven stars (six in a circle with one in the middle).

The First National Flag of the Confederacy was known as the “Stars and Bars.” By mid-1863, it had lost popularity and was replaced with a snow-white flag with the Confederate battle flag (St. Andrew’s cross) in the canton. This new flag was nicknamed the “Stainless Banner.” The flag’s use was short-lived, as in the absence of wind it resembled the white flag of surrender.

A snow-white flag, now stained by battle and time, with the Confederate battle flag (St. Andrew’s cross) in the canton.

The Texas State Library and Archives has almost two dozen Civil War flags in its collection. TSLAC 306-4067 is an enormous version of the Stainless Banner, measuring 69 x 145 inches (approximately six feet by twelve feet). The flag is inscribed with the name “Major Chas. R. Benton, C.S.A.” Major Benton was the chief ordnance officer at the Confederate garrison in Galveston, and the flag is believed to have flown there.

Page last modified: February 21, 2014