Texas Critters

Books to Share

  • Armadillo Tattletale by Helen Ketteman.
  • Desert Song by Tony Johnston.
  • Jackrabbit by Jonathan London.
  • Mr. Fine, Porcupine by Fanny Joly.
  • Way Out West Lives a Coyote Named Frank by Jillian Lund.

Books to Display and Booktalk

  • Ma'ii and Cousin Horned Toad: a Traditional Navajo Story by Shonto Begay.
  • Red Wolf Country by Jonathan London.

Display

Display puppets or stuffed animals representing Texas animals along with books about each.

Fingerplay

I Am an Armadillo

(By Tina Irene Hager)


(Tell the children about armadillos! They live in tunnels, eat bugs, roll into balls for protection, and hold their breath to swim. Then, sing this song to the tune of "Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush.")

This is the way we dig our tunnels, (Pretend to dig)


Dig our tunnels, dig our tunnels,


This is the way we dig our tunnels,


To get to our homes.

This is the way we lick up our bugs, (Pretend to lick bugs)


Lick up our bugs, lick up our bugs,


This is the way we lick up our bugs,


When we want something to eat.

This is the way we roll in a ball, (Pretend to roll into a ball)


Roll in a ball, roll in a ball,


This is the way we roll in a ball,


When we want to hide.

This is the way we hold our breath (Hold breath a little on each line)


Hold our breath, hold our breath,


This is the way we hold our breath,


When we walk under water.

Song

Ballad of the Boll Weevil

(By the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the boll weevil was causing devastation in America's cotton crops. This invasion inspired the following traditional song. Poet and bard Carl Sandberg performed a version of the song in the 1920s. Its precise origin is shrouded in the mists of the past. Copy the patterns of the boll weevil, farmer, sand, ice, fire, farmer's wife, hat, corn, dress, and sticks here and place the pieces on the flannel board while you sing this song.)

Oh the boll weevil is a little black bug,


Come from Mexico, they say,


Come all the way to Texas, just a-looking for a place to stay,


Just a-looking for a home, just a-looking for a home.

The first time I seen the boll weevil,


He was a-setting on the square.


Next time I seen the boll weevil, he had all of his family there.


Just a-looking for a home, just a-looking for a home.

The farmer said to the weevil:


"What make your head so red?"


The weevil said to the farmer, "It's a wonder I ain't dead,


A-looking for a home, just a-looking for a home."

The farmer took the boll weevil,


And he put him in the hot sand.


The weevil said, "This is might hot but I'll stand it like a man,


This'll be my home, it'll be my home.

The farmer took the boll weevil,


And he put him in a lump of ice;


The boll weevil said to the farmer,


"This is might cool and nice, it'll be my home, this'll be my home."

The farmer took the boll weevil,


And he put him in the fire.


The boll weevil said to the farmer, "Here I are, here I are,


This'll be my home, this'll be my home."

The farmer said to the missus,


"What do you think of that?


The boll weevil done make a nest in my best Sunday hat,


Going to have a home, going to have a home."

The boll weevil said to the farmer,


"You better leave me alone.


I done eat all your cotton, now I'm going to start on your corn,


I'll have a home, I'll have a home."

The merchant got half the cotton,


The boll weevil got the rest.


Didn't leave the farmer's wife but one old cotton dress,


And it's full of holes, it's full of holes.

The farmer said to the merchant,


"We's in an awful fix.


The boll weevil ate all the cotton up and left us only sticks,


We's got no home, we's got no home."

Crafts

Boll Weevil Stick Puppets

Materials

Directions

Copy and cut out the pattern of the boll weevil from the flannel board story. Children color them and glue or tape them to popsicle sticks or craft sticks. Sing "The Ballad of the Boll Weevil" and let the children hold up their puppets whenever the word, "Boll Weevil" is sung.

Armadillo Magnet

Materials

Directions

Copy the armadillo pattern. Trace it onto a piece of corkboard (found in hobby stores) or poster board and cut it out. Let the children glue on wiggly eyes, color it, and attach a magnet to the back.

Games and Activities

Coyote Howls

Have a howling contest and award prizes for the loudest, quietest, funniest, and most creative howl. Pony rides Arrange for live ponies for the children to ride, or bring stick ponies.

Guest Speakers

Invite an animal control officer, or a humane society, nature preserve, representative, or Texas Parks and Wildlife representative to speak to the children.

 



Texas Reading Club 2002 Programming Manual / Read Across Texas!


Published by the Library Development Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Page last modified: June 14, 2011