Yellow Roses of Texas

Books to Share

  • Cowboy Dreams by Dayal Kaur Khalsa.
  • Dusty Locks and the Three Bears by Susan Lowell.
  • Grandma According To Me by Karen Magnuson Beil.
  • Little Red Cowboy Hat by Susan Lowell.
  • Sachiko Means Happiness by Kimiko Sakai.
  • Sewing Quilts by Ann Turner.

Books to Display and Booktalk

  • Bossyboots by David Cox.
  • Cinnamon, Mint, and Mothballs: a Visit to Grandmother's House by Ruth Tiller.
  • Ganzy Remembers by Mary Grace Ketner.
  • I Have Heard of a Land by Joyce Carol Thomas.
  • Texas Star by Barbara Hancock Cole.

Rhymes

Pop Goes the Weasel

A penny for a spool of thread,


Another for a needle,


That's the way the money goes,


Pop! Goes the weasel.

All around the cobbler's bench,


The monkey chased the weasel,


The monkey thought 'twas all in fun!


Pop! Goes the weasel.

Songs

Buffalo Gals

As I went lumbering down the street,


Down the street, down the street,


A lovely gal I chanced to meet,


Oh! She was fair to view.


Buffalo Gals, will you come out tonight,


Come out tonight, come out tonight,


Buffalo gals, will you come out tonight


To dance by the light of the moon?

Sing "The Yellow Rose of Texas."

Story

Buttermilk Biscuits and Rattlesnake Gravy

(By Tina Hager)

(To make this an audience participation story, teach the children the refrain and have them clap their hands or pat their knees while they say it.)

Once upon a time, way out yonder in west Texas, a cowboy family lived on a ranch. There was a little boy named Cowboy Billy, and a little girl named Cowgirl Betty Joe, and they lived with their Cowgirl Mama, their Cowboy Papa, and their horse, Hit the Trail.

Now Cowgirl Mama loved to cook and her most famous dish was buttermilk biscuits with rattlesnake gravy. One day when Mama decided to make her biscuits, she noticed she was out of buttermilk. "Cowboy Billy," she called, "Run on in to town to the store and fetch me some buttermilk." Billy always obeyed his Mama and so he said, "Yes Ma'am" and headed toward town.

It just so happened that between the ranch and the town there was a small canyon. And a rock high up in that small canyon was the home of the biggest, meanest rattlesnake that ever lived. Very few people went into the canyon for fear of meeting up with the varmint. Unfortunately, it was the quickest way into town, so Billy went through the canyon, into town, to the store, and bought the buttermilk his mama needed. And then he went walkin' on home, singing:

Refrain: "Buttermilk biscuits and rattlesnake gravy.


Buttermilk biscuits and rattlesnake gravy."

From his home on that high rock, that big, old rattlesnake heard Billy walking and singing through the canyon. And before Billy could blink an eye, that rattlesnake jumped off his rock and swallered him whole, buttermilk and all, lickety split!

When Billy did not return home in a timely manner, Mama said, "Betty Jo, would you run on down to the store and find out what's taking Billy so long?" And Betty Jo said, "Yes, Ma'am," and headed toward town.

Well, Betty Jo went through the canyon, into town, and to the. The storekeeper told her that Billy had been there already and that he probably just stopped off somewhere to play. So she headed home, singing:

Refrain: "Buttermilk biscuits and rattlesnake gravy.


Buttermilk biscuits and rattlesnake gravy."

From his home on that high rock, that big, old rattlesnake spied Betty Jo walking and singing through the canyon. And before Betty Jo could blink an eye, that rattlesnake jumped off his rock and swallered her whole, lickety split!

Back at the ranch, mama and papa waited and wondered what had happened to their young'uns. Finally, Mama said, "Papa, would you run on into town and see what's keepin' them kids?" And Papa said, "Yes, Ma'am," and headed toward town.

Papa went through the canyon, into town, and to the store. The storekeeper told Papa that the kids had already been there and probably stopped off somewhere to play. So he headed home, singing:

Refrain: "Buttermilk biscuits and rattlesnake gravy.


Buttermilk biscuits and rattlesnake gravy."

From his home on that high rock, that big, old rattlesnake spied Papa walking and singing through the canyon. And before Papa could blink an eye, that rattlesnake jumped off his rock and swallered him whole, lickety split!

All this time Mama was back at the ranch getting' antsy. Where were her young'uns? Where was Papa? Where was her buttermilk? When Papa didn't arrive home in a timely manner with the children, Mama set off riding Hit the Trail. She rode through the canyon, into town, and to the store. The storekeeper told her that her family had been there but had probably stopped along the way to play. Mama and Hit the Trail started back home through the canyon, singing:

Refrain: "Buttermilk biscuits and rattlesnake gravy.


Buttermilk biscuits and rattlesnake gravy."

Now, as they were travelling through the canyon, Hit the Trail, he heard a hissing sound. He looked up and there on a high rock was that big, mean rattlesnake. It had a big ol' belly and a smile on its face. Suddenly that snake jumped off the rock and was gonna swallow Mama and Hit the Trail! But Hit the Trail saw him comin' and reared up and leaped aside. Luckily, that big old rattlesnake missed them and hit the canyon floor so hard that it busted open! And do you know what happened next?

Why, out came Billy, Betty Jo, Papa, and the buttermilk, all safe and sound, cause remember, that snake had swallowed them whole!

Mama and Papa grabbed up Billy and Betty Jo and they all climbed up onto Hit the Trail and high-tailed it on out of that canyon until they arrived home, safe and sound, with Mama's buttermilk! To celebrate, Mama mixed up the biggest batch of buttermilk biscuits and rattlesnake gravy Texas has ever seen! So much, in fact, that Mama invited all her neighbors over to enjoy her famous buttermilk biscuits and rattlesnake gravy!

Lickety split, lickety splout, this snake tale's told out!

Games and Activities

Little Sally Walker

(This is an African-American rhyme. Form a ring with "Sally" sitting in the center. Sing or chant the poem while "Sally" acts out the words. Whoever she looks at as she sings the last line takes her place.)

Little Sally Walker


Sitting in a saucer


Weeping in the morning


For her daughter


Rise Sally rise


Wipe your eyes


Look to the east


Look to the west


And look to the one


You love the best.

Craft

Fancy Cowgirl/Cowboy Boots

Materials

  • Boot pattern at the end of this chapter
  • Construction paper
  • Stickers
  • Glue
  • Colored markers
  • Tape

Directions

Make copies of the boot pattern, glue them onto construction paper, and cut them out. Each child colors and decorates four copies of the boot, decorates them with colored markers and stickers, and tapes one to each side of their shoes.

Guest Speakers

Invite women with various occupations to tell the children about their work.

Musical Recording

"Clementine" on Wee Sing Sing-Alongs by Pamela Conn Beall and Susan Hagen Nipp.

Video

  • Annie Oakley. (30 minutes)
  • The Patchwork Quilt. (30 minutes)

Professional Resource

Texas Women Who Dared to Be First by Jean Flynn.

 



Texas Reading Club 2002 Programming Manual / Read Across Texas!


Published by the Library Development Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Page last modified: June 14, 2011