Bilingual Programs Chapter

¡Vuélvete Loco Por el Desierto! / Go Wild in the Desert!

A Program for Toddlers

Books to Share and Display

  • Calor by Amado Peña.
  • La canción del lagarto by George Shannon.
  • Coyote by Gerald McDermott.
  • Cuando voy a pasear al desierto by Dana Meachen Rau.
  • Listen to the Desert / Oye al desierto by Pat Mora.
  • Viborita de cascabel by Te Ata.

Nametag

Coyote

Use the coyote nametag pattern to create nametags. Write each child’s name in the space provided.

Refreshments

Serve prickly pear cactus jelly on crackers. It can be purchased in many supermarkets and over the Internet. If you are brave, try one of the many simple recipes and make your own pear cactus jelly! You might also offer the children samples of candied nopalitas. Most American children will not be familiar with this Mexican treat, which is available in many Mexican markets.

Fingerplays

Pimpirigallo

(Traditional, translated by Consuelo Forray. This fingerplay can also be presented as a game for two or more people, such as an adult and one or more toddlers. The first person extends one hand, closed in a fist. The second person pinches the top of the outstretched hand. The next person pinches the second person’s hand, and so on until all hands form a tower. In Spanish “gallo” means “rooster.”)

Pimpirigallo, (Hands form a tower)


Monta a caballo, (Move tower of hands up and down as if galloping)


Con las espuelas


De mi tocayo.


Y... volaron los gallos. (Separate hands as if flying away in all directions)

Translation:

Pimpirigallo,


get on your horse,


wearing the spurs belonging to my namesake.


And...the roosters fly away.

Rhymes and Poetry

Coyote, coyote

(Adapted by Consuelo Forray)

Coyote, coyote, da un brinco, (Jump)


Coyote, coyote, cuenta hasta cinco, (Count to five)


Coyote, coyote, come una tuna, (Pretend to eat a fruit)


Coyote, coyote, aúlla a la luna, (Howl at the moon)


Coyote, coyote, da un paso al costado (Take one step to the right)


Coyote, coyote, da un paso al otro lado (Take one step to the left)

Las horas (The Hours)

(By Consuelo Forray)

A la una, comí una tuna, (Hold up finger; pretend to eat a fruit)


A las dos, vi dos zorros, (Hold up two fingers; pretend to look far ahead)


A las tres, vuelta es; (Hold up three fingers; turn around)


A las cuatro, de aullar yo trato, (Hold up four fingers; howl)


A las cinco, pego un brinco. (Hold up five fingers; jump)

The Hours

(English tranlsation by Consuelo Forray)

At one o’clock, I eat a prickly pear, (Hold up finger; pretend to eat a fruit)


At two, I see two foxes, (Hold up two fingers; pretend to look far ahead)


At three, I turn around, (Hold up three fingers; turn around)


At four, I howl, (Hold up four fingers; howl)


At five, I jump. (Hold up five fingers; jump)

Rema el barco

(Traditional)

Rema, rema, rema el barco


Suave por el mar,


Felicidad, felicidad,


La vida es soñar

Row, Row, Row Your Boat

Row, row your boat


Gently down the stream


Merrily, merrily, merrily,


Life is but a dream.

Songs

Canta conmigo

(Use this song from Canta conmigo, Vol. 2 by Juanita Newland-Ulloa to open your program. Encourage the children to sway and do simple dance steps while singing. Printed with permission of Juanita Newland-Ulloa. For ordering information, contact juanita@juanitamusic.com or 510-632-6296.)

Canta, canta conmigo, lara larara lara.


Canta, canta conmigo, baila, baila tambien.

Sing With Me

Sing, sing with me, lara larara lara.


Sing, sing with me, dance, dance, too.

Animales en el desierto

(Adapted by Consuelo Forray. Sing to the tune of “The Wheels on the Bus.” The children pretend to be desert animals, such as rabbits/los conejos jumping by the prickly pears, coyotes howling, snakes/las culebras slithering by rocks, and ants/las hormigas marching by the desert.)

Los conejos por los cactus van brinca, brinca, brinca,


Brinca, brinca, brinca, brinca, brinca, brinca


Los conejos por los cactus van brinca, brinca, brinca,


Por los desiertos.

Los coyotes por los cerros van Auuu, Auuu, Auuu, Auuu,


Auuu, Auuuu, Auuu, Auuu, Auuu,


Los coyotes por los cerros van Auuu, Auuu, Auuu,


Por los desiertos.

Las culebras en las rocas van Sssss, Sssss, Sssss,


Sssss, Sssss, Sssss, Sssss, Sssss, Sssss


Las culebras en las rocas van Sssss, Sssss, Sssss,


Por los desiertos.

Las hormigas en la arena van marcha, marcha, marcha,


Marcha, marcha, marcha, marcha, marcha, marcha


Las hormigas en la arena van marcha, marcha, marcha,


Por los desiertos.

Tipi, tipi, tín

(Traditional, adapted by Consuelo Forray. Sing to the tune of “Frere Jacques.” On a walk through the desert, the children see a scorpion/un escorpión, a snake/una culebra, a mouse/un ratón, and a coyote/un coyote. They get so scared that they can hear their hearts pounding! Repeat the verse, substituting each of the animals in place of “un escorpión.” Suit actions to the words.)

Tipi, tipi, tín, tipi tín,


Tipi, tipi, tón, tipi tón,


Yendo por el desierto,


¡Ay, que susto! Vi un escorpión.


Tipi, tipi, tín, tipi tín,


Tipi, tipi, tón, tipi tón,


Oye el sonido del fuerte latido


De mi corazón.

Audio Recordings

Tipi, tipi, tín” on Lírica infantil con José-Luis Orozco volumen 2 by José-Luis Orozco.

Puppet Shows

El coyote que se olvido

(Translated and adapted by Consuelo Forray based on “The Dog Who Forgot” in One-Person Puppet Plays by Denise Anton Wright. Copyright 1990 by Teacher Ideas Press, a Division of Greenwood Publishing Group, Inc. Used by permission of the publisher. This puppet show features Coyote, a slightly forgetful animal, and his friends, who try to help him remember.)

Characters
  • Coyote
  • Roadrunner
  • Snake
  • Mouse
  • Boy

[Coyote enters, yawning]

COYOTE: [speaking to the audience] ¡Qué mañana tan hermosa! El sol está brillando y los pájaros cantando. Voy a ir de paseo a visitar algunos de mis amigos.

[Coyote walks across the stage. Suddenly he stops and looks perplexed.]

COYOTE: OH, no. Se me olvidó. No me acuerdo como los coyotes hablan. Nunca me había pasado esto antes. ¿Qué puedo hacer? Creo que voy a preguntarle a mi amigo Correcaminos. Correcaminos sabe todo. Estoy seguro que me podrá ayudar. [calling off-stage] ¡Correcaminos! ¡Correcaminos!

ROADRUNNER: [enters] Hola, Coyote. ¿Que te pasa?

COYOTE: [morosely] Tengo un problema terrible, Correcaminos. Cuando desperté esta mañana se me había olvidado como los coyotes hablan. Tienes que ayudarme. ¡Por favor!

ROADRUNNER: OH, eso es fácil. Los coyotes dicen así: “Beep, beep.”

COYOTE: [uncertainly] ¿Estás seguro?

[Roadrunner enthusiastically nods his head.]

COYOTE: Está bien, aquí va: “BEEP,BEEP,BEEP.” No, no creo que ese sonido sea correcto. Yo creo que recordaría si tuviera que decir "beep, beep.” Gracias de todas maneras, Correcaminos.

ROADRUNNER: Adios, Coyote, mucha suerte y que recuerdes pronto.

[Roadrunner exits.]

COYOTE: [unhappily] ¿Qué puedo hacer? Tengo que recordar como los coyotes hablan. [cocks his head to indicate he has an idea] Quizás mi amiga Culebra sabe. Culebra es muy inteligente. [calling to off-stage] ¡Culebra! ¡Culebra!

[Snake enters.]

SNAKE: Hola, Coyote. ¿Que te pasa?

COYOTE: [morosely] Tengo un problema terrible, Culebra. Cuando desperté esta mañana se me había olvidado como los coyotes hablan. Tienes que ayudarme. ¡Por favor!

SNAKE: Oh, eso es fácil. Los coyotes dicen: “ssss,ssss,ssss,ssss.”

COYOTE: [confused] ¿Estás segura?

[Snake enthusiastically nods her head.]

COYOTE: Esta bien aquí va: “SSSS, SSSS, SSSS.” No, no creo que ese sonido sea correcto. Yo creo que recordaría si tuviera que decir “ssss, ssss.” Gracias de todas maneras, Culebra.

SNAKE: Adios, Coyote, mucha suerte y que recuerdes pronto. [Snake exits.]

COYOTE: [speaking very unhappily to the audience] ¿Qué va a pasar conmigo? Simplemente tengo que recordar como los coyotes hablan. [has another idea] Talvez mi amigo Ratón pueda ayudarme. [calling off-stage] ¡Ratón! ¡Ratón!

[Mouse enters.]

MOUSE: Hola, Coyote. ¿Qué te pasa?

COYOTE: [morosely] Estoy en un terrible problema, Ratón. Desperté esta mañana y se me había olvidado como los coyotes hablan. Tienes que ayudarme. ¡Por favor!

MOUSE: Oh, eso es fácil. Los coyotes dicen: "squeak, squeak.”

COYOTE: Está bien, aquí va: “SQUEAK, SQUEAK, SQUEAK.” No, no creo que ese sonido sea correcto. Yo creo que recordaría si tuviera que decir “squeak, squeak.” Gracias de todas maneras, Ratón.

MOUSE: Adios, Coyote, mucha suerte y que recuerdes pronto.

[Mouse exits the stage.]

COYOTE: [almost crying] ¡Esperen a que mis amigos me vean! Cuando se enteren que se me olvidó como los coyotes hablan, se van a reír de mi.

[Boy enters the stage.]

BOY: [to Coyote] ¿Qué te pasa, Coyote? Te ves preocupado.

COYOTE: [miserably] Tengo un terrible problema, Niño. Me desperté esta mañana y se me había olvidado como los coyotes hablan.

BOY: Yo te puedo ayudar.

COYOTE: [excited] ¿Puedes? ¿De verdad?

BOY: Por supuesto. Los coyotes dicen así. [Boy howls like a coyote] AUUU-AUUUU-AUUUU.

COYOTE: ¡Ahora si me acordé! [Coyote howls] ¡No se como se me pudo haber olvidado algo tan sencillo! ¡Que tonto soy! [speaking to Boy] ¡Muchas gracias!

BOY: ¡De nada! Estoy muy contento de haber podido ayudarte. ¿Estás seguro que recordarás como los coyotes hablan?

COYOTE: ¡Por supuesto! ¡Nunca jamás me olvidaré de nuevo!

BOY: Adiós, Coyote!

[Boy exits the stage.]

COYOTE: [speaking to the audience] ¡Ahora que he recordado, nunca jamás me voy a olvidar!

[Coyote begins walking across the stage. Suddenly he stops and looks perplexed.]

COYOTE: OH, no. Se me olvidó. [speaking to the audience] ¿Pueden ayudarme a recordar una vez más como los coyotes hablan? [Coyote waits for the audience to howl] Sí, sí. Ya me acordé. ¡Adiós! ¡Gracias por haberme ayudado!

[Coyote exits the stage, howling.]

Crafts

Rattlesnake Noisemakers

Materials
  • Clean, empty 16 oz. plastic soda bottles
  • Construction paper, cut into half sheets
  • Markers or crayons
  • Glue
  • Scotch tape
  • Poster Board
  • Unpopped popcorn
  • Hot glue gun (for adult use only; use with caution around small children.)
Directions

Give each child a half sheet of construction paper to decorate with the crayons or markers. When the design is finished, wrap it around the bottle to cover the label and tape or hot glue it in place. Pour a handful of popcorn kernels into the soda bottle and hot glue the cap back on, or hot glue a round piece of poster board on the top. (Make sure it is well-sealed for use with young children.) Children can practice hissing while shaking their noisemakers!

Games and Activities

Trabalenguas (Tongue Twisters)

(Translated by Consuelo Forray. Most Spanish-speaking toddlers will only say “albón”. In Spanish “diga” means “say,” so it’s like saying: “say albón say”.)

Diga albóndiga,


Albóndiga, diga.

Aserrín, aserrán

(Translated by Consuelo Forray. The parent or caregiver sits with the child and holds hands, rocking the child back and forth, making the child laugh. At the end, the parent or caregiver can tickle the child on the neck.)

Aserrín, aserrán


Los maderos de San Juan


Piden pan y no se lo dan


Piden queso y les dan un hueso


Para que se rasquen el pescuezo

Aserrín, aserrán,


The lumberjacks of San Juan


Ask for bread and do not get it


Ask for cheese and they get a bone


So that may scratch their neck

Professional Resources

One-Person Puppet Plays by Denise Anton Wright.

 



Texas Reading Club 2005 Programming Manual / Go Wild...Read!


Published by the Library Development Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Page last modified: June 14, 2011