Navegando en la tina y otras costumbres para por la noche/


Sailing in the Bathtub and other Night Rituals

Books to Share

  • ¡Al agua patos! by Fiona Watt.
  • Chirrinchinchina ¿Qué hay en la tina? by Mary Blocksma.
  • Clifford: el gran perro colorado by Norman Bridwell.
  • 10 minutos y a la cama by Peggy Rathman.
  • ¿Es hora? by Marilyn Janovitz.
  • King Bidgood’s in the Bathtub by Audrey Wood.
  • The Lady with the Alligator Purse by Nadine Bernard Westcott.
  • ¡No, David! by David Shannon.
  • Problemas con burbujas by Frank B. Edwards.

Books to Show or Booktalk

  • Harry el perrito sucio by Gene Zion.
  • Oh No, Gotta Go! by Susan Middleton Elya.
  • ¡Tengo que ir! by Robert N. Munsch.

Bulletin Board

Navegando en la tina

Cover the bulletin board with pastel colored paper and create a bathtub shape out of a contrasting colored paper. Add toy or paper ships, rubber ducks, bubbles, and brush figures using the patterns provided. For added interest, draw a shower curtain bar at the top of the bulletin board, and staple an inexpensive shower curtain below it.

To add origami ships, follow the directions available at Origami with Rachel Katz, www.geocities.com/rachel_katz/stories/pilgrims.htm.

Nametags

El patito

Use the rubber duck pattern to create nametags.

Displays

Display picture books about taking a bath. Place bath toys such as rubber ducks, boats, balls, plastic fish, and bath mittens around the display.

Refreshments

Dirt Cake

Preparation time (20 minutes). Serves 15 to 20.

Ingredients

  • One 16-ounce. package of Oreo™ cookies (freeze overnight)
  • One 8-ounce package of instant chocolate or vanilla pudding
  • 3 cups of milk
  • One 8-ounce package cream cheese, softened
  • One 16-ounce container of Cool Whip™
  • Gummy worms
  • A new clean plastic flowerpot
  • A new clean trowel
  • Candy rocks
  • Artificial flowers

Directions

Crumble the Oreo™ cookies, a few at a time, in a blender or food processor. In a separate container, blend the pudding and milk. In a separate container, blend the cream cheese and Cool Whip and add to the pudding mixture and stir. Put a layer of crumbled Oreos™ into the flowerpot, add some pudding, and place some of the candy worms into the mix. Continue layering the Oreos™, pudding, and worms. The top layer of "dirt" is made of Oreo™ cookies with worms wriggling out. Place flowers and candy rocks on top. Refrigerate overnight.  Serve the cake using the trowel.

Note: This recipe can be made non-fat by using skim milk and non-fat cookies.

Fingerplays

Soplemos pompas de jabón

(By Paola Ferate-Soto.)

Soplemos pompas de jabón:


soplemos una pequeñita,   (Cup your hands as if you are holding a small bubble)


soplemos una mediana,   (Cup your hands as if you are holding a medium size bubble)


soplemos una grandotota,   (Cup your hands as if you are holding a large bubble)


¿Cuántas ves?


Vamos a contarlas:


una, dos y tres.
   (Change the spacing of your hands as you count them)

Let’s Make Bubbles

(English translation by Paola Ferate-Soto.)

Let’s make bubbles.


Let’s make a small one   (Cup your hands as if you are holding a small bubble)


Let’s make a medium one   (Cup your hands as if you are holding a medium size bubble)


Let’s make a great big one   (Cup your hands as if you are holding a large bubble)


How many do you see?


Let’s count them:


1, 2, 3   (Change the spacing of your hands as you count them)

La pequeña Kim

(Adapted by Paola Ferate-Soto. Spanish translation by Paola Ferate-Soto.)

Yo tenía una ranita,   (Make a fist to represent a frog)


llamada pequeña Kim.


La puse en la bañera
   (Pretend you are setting her down)


a ver cómo nadaba.   (Make swimming motion with arms)


Se tragó toda el agua.   (Raise your head up and pretend you are swallowing water)


Se comió todo el jabón.   (Pretend you are eating)


Y ya después no quiso


que la bañara yo.
   (Make a face and hold your stomach as if you are sick)

Tiny Kim

(Traditional. Adapted by Paola Ferate-Soto.)

I had a little froggie,   (Make a fist to represent a frog)


I named her Tiny Kim.


I put her in the bathtub,   (Pretend you are setting her down)


To see if she could swim   (Make swimming motion with arms)


She drank up all the water   (Raise your head up and pretend you are swallowing water)


She ate up all the soap   (Make munching motions)


And after that she didn’t like


To take baths any more.   (Make a face and hold your stomach as if you are sick)

Las siete vidas del gato

(By Rafael Pombo. Public domain. According to Latin American tradition, the cat has seven lives, rather than the nines lives that are attributed to this animal in the United States.)

Preguntó al gato Mambrú


el lebrel Perdonavidas:


Pariente de Micifú


“¿Qué secreto tienes tú


para vivir siete vidas?”

Y Mambrú le contestó:


“Mi secreto es muy sencillo,


pues no consiste sinó


en frecuentar como yo


el aseo y el cepillo.”

The Cat’s Seven Lives

(English translation by Paola Ferate-Soto.)

The hound Forgiver-of-lives


Had an important question for Mambru the cat,


Relation of Micifu:


“What secret do you have


To live seven lives?”

And Mambru replied this way:


“My secret is very simple


Since it only consists of


Being close friends with


Washing and brushing.”

Songs

The Lady With the Alligator Purse

Read and sing The Lady With the Alligator Purse by Nadine Bernard Westcott.

La danza de la tina

(Adapted by Paola Ferate-Soto from “The Hokey Pokey.” Tell the children that the water is a bit cold and you don’t know if you really want to get into the tub. Then follow the actions of the song, pretending that you are having second thoughts every time you introduce a new body part into the tub.)

Metes tu mano derecha,


sacas tu mano derecha,


metes tu mano derecha,


y la sacudes muy bien.


Bailas la danza de la tina,


y te limpias bien la mano


¡Y … eso es todo!

Metes tu mano izquierda,


sacas tu mano izquierda,


metes tu mano izquierda,


y la sacudes muy bien.


Bailas la danza de la tina,


y te limpias bien la mano


¡Y … eso es todo!

Metes tu pierna derecha,


sacas tu pierna derecha…


Metes tu pierna izquierda,


sacas tu pierna izquierda…


Metes tu lado derecho,


sacas tu lado derecho…


Metes tu lado izquierdo,


sacas tu lado izquierdo…

Te metes adentro,


te vas para afuera,


te metes adentro,


y te sacudes muy bien.


Bailas la danza de la tina,


y te limpias bien la mano


¡Y… eso es todo!

The Bath Time Pokey

(English translation by Paola Ferate-Soto.Tell the children that the water is a bit cold and you don’t know if you really want to get into the tub. Then follow the actions of the song, pretending that you are having second thoughts every time you introduce a new body part into the tub.)

You put your right hand in,


You put your right hand out,


You put your right hand in


And you shake it all about.

You do the bath time pokey,


And you scrub that hand clean.


That's what it's all about!

You put your left hand in,


You put your left hand out …

You put your right leg in,


You put your right leg out …

You put your left leg in,


You put your left leg out …

You put your right side in,


You put your right side out…

You put your left side in,


You put your left side out …

You put your whole self in,


You put your whole self out,


You put your whole self in


And you shake it all about.


You do the bath time pokey,


And you turn yourself around.


That's what it's all about!

Action Rhymes

Las gotitas de agua

(Traditional school song from Mexico. In this action rhyme, children pretend that they are taking a shower.)

¡Qué bonito juegan   (Pretend you are turning on your shower)


las gotitas de agua


de la regadera!


Saltan por los hombros  
(Put fingertips together and tap your shoulders)


juegan con el pelo   (With fingertips together, make your hands “ jump” around your hair)


y por todo el cuerpo   (With fingertips together, make your hands “ jump” all over your body)


van ruedan que ruedan


caen todas a un tiempo 
  (Move hands palm down on sides of body)


y me hacen gritar:


¡AYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY!  
(Shake your hands while you scream)


Traviesas gotitas


que quieren jugar.

The Little Water Droplets

(English translation by Paola Ferate-Soto.)

How beautiful they play   (Pretend you are turning on your shower)


The water drops that fall down


From the showerhead.


They jump from the shoulders   (Put fingertips together and tap your shoulders)


And play with my hair   (With fingertips together, make your hands “ jump” around your hair)


They travel down my body   (With fingertips together, make your hands “ jump” all over your body)


Rolling and rolling


All of a sudden they fall all together   (Move hands palm down on sides of body)


And they make me scream:


AYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY   (Shake your hands while you scream)


Naughty little drops


That want to play.

Audio Recordings

  • “Rubber Ducky” by Jeff Moss on Songs from the Street: 35 Years of Music by Sesame Street.
  • “Rubber Duckie,” “Rub-a-Dub-Dub,” “Splish Splash, Bathtime,” “There’s a Hippo in my Tub,” “You Can Never Go Down the Drain,” “Bubble Bath” and other songs on Bathtime Magic by Joanie Bartels.

Stories to Tell

Pimpón

(This is a traditional song that can be used as a flannel board story by reproducing the patterns provided (Pimpon, bed/comb/soup, window, soap and water). It can also be used as an action rhyme by mimicking the actions told in the song. If you don’t know the music, you can find it on Diez Deditos / Ten Little Fingers and Other Play Rhymes and Action Songs from Latin America by José-Luis Orozco and on Lírica infantil con José-Luis Orozco v.1 by José Luis-Orozco.)

Pimpón es un muñeco


con manos de cartón


se lava su carita
   (Pretend to wash your face)


con agua y con jabón.

Se desenreda el pelo   (Pretend to comb your hair)


con peine de marfíl


y aunque no le gusta


no llora, ni hace así.  
(Make a face as if you are in pain)

Cuando come la sopa,   (Pretend to eat soup)


no ensucia el delantal,


pues come con cuidado


como un buen colegial.

Y cuando las estrellas


comienzan a salir


Pimpón se va a la cama
   (Lay your head on your hands and close your  eyes)


Pimpón se va dormir.

Pimpón dame la mano   (Shake hands with as many children as you can reach)


con un fuerte apretón


que quiero ser tu amigo


Pimpón, Pimpón, Pimpón.

Pimpon

(English translation by Paola Ferate-Soto.)

Pimpon is a doll


With hands of cardboard.


He washes his face


With water and with soap.   (Pretend to wash your face)

He untangles his hair,


With an ivory comb,   (Pretend to comb your hair)


And even though he pulls his hair,


He doesn’t cry at all.   (Make a face as if you are in pain)

When he eats his soup,


His apron remains clean,   (Pretend to eat soup)


Since he eats as carefully


As any good student would.

And when the stars above us


Start to rise up high,


Pimpon climbs up in bed,


Pimpon goes right to sleep.   (Lay your head on your hands and close your eyes)

Pimpon give me your hand,


And let us shake hands,


I want to be your friend,


Pimpon, Pimpon, Pimpon.   (Shake hands with as many children as you can reach)

Crafts

Bath Sponges

Materials

  • Colorful sponges
  • String
  • Scissors

Directions

In advance, cut the sponges into narrow strips about four inches long. Or, let the parents help the children cut the sponges into narrow strips about four inches long. The children then choose variously colored strips, tie them in the middle with a piece of string, and fluff them out.

Bubble Print

Materials

  • Food color
  • Liquid dishwashing soap
  • Plastic cups
  • Plastic drinking straws
  • White cardstock

Directions

In advance, use a pin or pushpin to punch a small hole near the top of each straw. Pour food color, a little water, and dishwashing soap into plastic cups. Give each child a cup of liquid and a straw. Tell the children to place the straw into the cup and then blow into the end of the straw closest to the hole to create foam. (The hole will help to prevent them from swallowing the soapy water and will allow them to inhale air if they begin to suck into the straw.) Then let the children lay a piece of heavy white paper or cardstock over the bubbles to create a bubble print. They can repeat the process with other colors.

Games and Activities

Blowing Bubbles

Blow soap bubbles and let the children chase them.

Taking a Bath

Pretend that you are taking a bath. Have everyone follow your lead. Say “Así me lavo el pelo,” (This is the way I wash my hair.) “Así me lavo el cuello” (This is the way I wash my neck.) “Así me lavo los codos(This is the way I wash my elbows.) Add more fun by making silly statements: “Así me lavo los párpados(This is the way I wash my eyelids.)  “Así me lavo toda / todo(This is the way I wash my everything.)

Videos/DVDs/Films

If you have public performance rights, show these videos and DVDs, or segments of them, to the children. Otherwise, display them for home use. Times are indicated for the entire film.

  • “Squishi, Squishi, Squishi” (“Squishy, Squashy, Washy”), “Me cepillo los dientes” (“Brushing My Teeth”), or  “El jugar en el baño” (“Splashin' in the Bath”) on  More Barney Songs / Más canciones de Barney, Lyons Partnership, 1999. (The video is dubbed into Spanish.) (55 minutes)
  • El baño” (Rubber Duckie) on Éxitos musicales de Plaza Sésamo by Children’s Television Workshop. (45 minutes)

Professional Resources

Diez Deditos / Ten Little Fingers and Other Play Rhymes and Action Songs from Latin America by José Luis Orozco.

The Lady With the Alligator Purse by Nadine Bernard Westcott

Lírica infantil con José-Luis Orozco V.1 by José Luis Orozco.

Origami with Rachel Katz


www.geocities.com/rachel_katz/stories/pilgrims.htm


This web site shows how to make a very simple boat while following the story of how the Pilgrims came to North America.

 



Texas Reading Club 2007 Programming Manual / Sail Away with Books!


Published by the Library Development Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Page last modified: June 14, 2011