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Books to Share

  • Dear Mr. Blueberry by Simon James.
  • A Drop Around the World by Barbara Shaw McKinney.
  • A Drop of Water: A Book of Science and Wonder by Walter Wick.
  • Stringbean’s Trip to the Shining Sea by Vera B. Williams.
  • Water by Susan Canizares.

Books to Show or Booktalk

  • Abel’s Island by William Steig.
  • The Barefoot Fisherman: A Fishing Book for Kids by Paul Amdahl.
  • Evil Under the Sea: A Miss Mallard Mystery by Robert Quackenbush.
  • Regarding the Sink: Where, Oh Where, Did Waters Go? by Kate Klise.
  • 20,000 Baseball Cards Under the Sea by Jon Buller.
  • Under Water (Andrew Lost # 5) by J.C. Greenburg.
  • Waves by Steve Hawk.

Bulletin Board

Demco, www.demco.com, sells posters that feature the theme, “Dive Into Reading.” Use these or create something similar for your bulletin board.

Incentives

Demco, www.demco.com, sells a variety of inexpensive bookmarks and coloring bookmarks as part of the “Dive Into Reading” package that could be used as prizes and incentives.

Songs

Thunder and Rain

(Adapted by Shelly Lane. Sing to the tune of “Are You Sleeping.”)

There is thunder, there is thunder,   (Pound floor with palm of hands)


Hear it boom, hear it boom,


Pitter, patter, rain is falling,   (Slap knees alternately and quickly)


Pitter, patter, rain is falling,


Run for home, run for home.   (Make running motion)

It’s Raining, It’s Pouring

(Traditional.)

It’s raining, it’s pouring,


The old man is snoring.


He bumped his head


And he went to bed


And he couldn’t get up in the morning.

Rain, Rain

(Traditional.)

Rain, rain, go away.


Come again some other day.


We want to go outside and play.


Come again some other day.

Rhymes and Poetry

How to Cross a Pond: Poems About Water by Marilyn Singer.

Read or print and post some of the poetry about rivers and water written by children that are available at River of Words, www.riverofwords.org/poetry/index.html.

Puppet Plays

Perform Mushroom in the Rain by Mirra Ginsburg using a collapsed umbrella and stuffed animals.

“The Jolly Tailor” by Lucia Mercka Borski and Kate B. Miller in Rainy Day: Stories and Poems edited by Caroline Feller Bauer.

“When the Rain Came up From China” by Dell J. McCormick in Rainy Day: Stories and Poems edited by Caroline Feller Bauer.

Crafts

Goop

Materials

  • Water
  • Food coloring (optional; may stain)
  • Corn flour or cornstarch
  • Small mixing bowls
  • Baggies or plastic “Easter” eggs

Directions

Mix 2 cups of water with a little food coloring. Add 6 cups of corn flour or cornstarch to make goop. Mix well. The children can stretch, twist, and roll the goop in a ball in their hands, like silly putty. Give each child a baggie or plastic Easter egg in which to store the Goop.

Waves in a Bottle

Materials

  • Clear plastic soft drink or water bottles, with caps
  • Water
  • Blue food coloring
  • Mineral or vegetable oil
  • Waterproof glue or hot glue gun

Directions

Give each child a bottle filled about two-thirds full with water. Add the food coloring to tint the water. Fill the bottle to the top with mineral or vegetable, leaving no room for air bubbles to form. Glue the lid securely to the bottle with hot glue or waterproof glue. Be sure that the glue is non-toxic or that an adult helps with the hot glue gun. After the glue dries, hold the bottle sideways and gently rock it back and forth to make waves.

Colorful Hawaiian Leis

Using directions on The Best Kids Book Site at www.thebestkidsbooksite.com, let the children make “Colorful Hawaiian Leis” craft.

Fancy Flip Flops

Let the children make the “Fancy Flip-Flops” craft on The Best Kids Book Site at www.thebestkidsbooksite.com. Ask the children to bring a pair of flip-flops, or purchase them from a discount store. Provide additional decorations such as artificial flowers, buttons, sequins, and shells that can be attached with craft glue or hot glue guns.

Games and Activities

Rainstorm

The librarian will speak each word to start the children making weather sound effects. For a real “storm,” divide the group into sections and let the children in each section make one of the four noises.

  • Wind:   Rub the palms of the hands together to start the wind rustling in the leaves.
  • Raindrops:   Snap the fingers slowly, then quickly, to bring on the raindrops
  • Downpour:   Slap the thighs with increasing speed to strengthen and increase the downpour.
  • Thunder:   Stamp the feet to add thunder to the downpour

Sinking and Floating

Materials

  • 2 large tubs
  • Water
  • Salt
  • 10 or 12 objects that sink or float in water, such as a metal spoon, a rubber ball or a rubber duck, wood, crayons, corks, sponge, rock and seashells
  • Can of regular soda
  • Can of sugar-free soda
  • Modeling clay

Directions

Fill one large tub with plain water, and the other with salt water. Add 1/2 ounce of salt to a pint jar of water to simulate seawater (each gallon of seawater contains approximately 1/4 pound of salt.) Show the children the objects and ask them which objects they think will float and which will sink and why. Invite the children to place the items first in the plain water and then in the salt water. The can of regular soda will sink, while the sugar-free will float because sugar affects the density of the cola. 

Why do objects float in salt water?  By adding salt, the water becomes heavier and denser than fresh water.  See Floating and Sinking by Peter D. Riley to help you with the science.

Give the children modeling clay and let them make a variety of shapes. Let them place the objects in the plain water to see which ones float best. Then, let them see how well the shapes float in the saltwater.

Note:  The Dead Sea contains nine times more salt than regular seawater.  Add 4 ounces of salt to the pint jar to simulate the Dead Sea.

Fun with Water

Use Experimenting with Water by Robert Gardner to try some fun experiments with water.

Texas Wetlands Discovery Trunk

Contact Texas Parks and Wildlife to borrow a wetlands discovery trunk. The trunks contain books, videos, posters and lesson plans, field equipment, and Texas Amphibian Watch materials to guide children in their investigations of wetland habitats. The Texas Parks and Wildlife web site, www.tpwd.state.tx.us/learning/resources/trunks/wetlandstrunk.phtml, provides the details and contact information about how this state agency makes the trunks available for loan to formal and informal educators and youth leaders.

Web Sites

Drinking Water & Ground Water Kids' Stuff


www.epa.gov/safewater/kids


The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency offers kids fun information on safe water.

Safe Water for Kids


www.ecn.purdue.edu/SafeWater/kids


Part of an education program sponsored by Purdue Extension Safe Water office, this site includes indoor and outdoor activities.

Texas Parks and Wildlife


www.tpwd.state.tx.us/kids


Learn about Texas parks and the wildlife in the state at this agency web site, which also includes activities, printable materials, coloring sheets, games, and more for kids.

Professional Resources

Experimenting with Water by Robert Gardner.

Floating and Sinking by Peter D. Riley.

How to Cross a Pond: Poems About Water by Marilyn Singer.

Mushroom in the Rain by Mirra Ginsburg.

Rainy Day: Stories and Poems edited by Caroline Feller Bauer.

The Best Kids Book Site


www.thebestkidsbooksite.com


Hundreds of ideas for simple kids’ crafts are provided on this site.

Demco


www.demco.com


This library supplier sells a variety of inexpensive bookmarks related to the themes.

River of Words


www.riverofwords.org/poetry/index.html


This web site, hosted by River of Words, a non-profit group that connects kids with their watershed, includes children’s poetry about water.

Texas Parks and Wildlife


www.tpwd.state.tx.us/learning/resources/trunks/wetlandstrunk.phtml


In addition to providing information about its educational trunks for loan, this state agency’s site offers lesson plans and activities related to outdoor fun.

 



Texas Reading Club 2007 Programming Manual / Sail Away with Books!


Published by the Library Development Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Page last modified: June 14, 2011