Texas Governors and Their Times

A logo with the text of Texas Governors and Their Times 1846-1946


In This Exhibit:   The Governor's Office  |  The Governor's Mansion  | 
Early Statehood  |  War, Ruin, and Reconstruction  |  The Wild West  |
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Texas Rising

This photo shows four notable Texans: Francis R. Lubbock, former governor and state treasurer; John H. Reagan, first chairman of the Railroad Commission; A.W. Terrell, former legislator, ambassador, and regent of the University of Texas; and Governor James Hogg.

James Stephen Hogg (seated at right) with John Reagan and others, 1905. Image 1982/380-1, Prints and Photographs.
Governor Hogg, the first native-born Texan to serve as governor, created the Railroad Commission to protect the public interest against powerful corporations. This photo shows four notable Texans: Francis R. Lubbock, former governor and state treasurer; John H. Reagan, first chairman of the Railroad Commission; A.W. Terrell, former legislator, ambassador, and regent of the University of Texas; and Governor James Hogg. Austin, Texas, in about 1905.

Governors during the period of the turn of the nineteenth to the twentieth century saw Texas move into the modern era. By the end of the 1800s, Texas was changing from a primarily rural state to one with bustling industries built around farming and ranching. Family farms shifted to commercial enterprises. The ever-expanding railroads continued to bring in more people and move them around once they arrived. The population grew around rail lines, and cities like Houston and Dallas became major urban centers. Laborers from countries such as China and Ireland immigrated to Texas to build railroad tracks, and some remained after projects were completed, creating more diverse communities. The oil boom exploded after the gusher at Spindletop produced record-breaking numbers during drilling in 1901. Governor James Stephen Hogg had represented farmers and others who wanted fair business practices while serving as attorney general, and he brought this platform to the governor’s mansion. He was instrumental in the establishment of the Texas Railroad Commission.

 


Wax phonograph cylinder, undated. Hogg (James Stephen) speech, Box 2-22/L16a.

Wax phonograph cylinder, undated. Hogg (James Stephen) speech, Box 2-22/L16a. Click or tab on image to view larger version.

This phonograph cylinder contains an early recording of a speech by Governor Hogg. It was donated to the Texas State Archive in 1910 by Oscar Branch Colquitt, who served as governor from 1911 to 1915.

Signed proclamation with a seal. Reward for the capture of Lewis Means, June 1, 1893.

Reward for the capture of Lewis Means,
June 1, 1893.
Texas Governor James Stephen
Hogg records, Box 301-144. Image 1, Image 2. Click or tap on image and links and to view larger versions.

A former district attorney and Attorney General of Texas, Hogg helped strengthen public respect for law enforcement. This proclamation issues a reward for the capture of fugitive Lewis Means.

Signed proclamation with a seal. Reward for the capture of Jim Jones, December 26, 1893.

Reward for the capture of Jim Jones,
December 26, 1893.
Texas Governor James Stephen Hogg records, Box 301-144. Image 1, Image 2. Click or tap on image and links and to view larger versions.

A former district attorney and Attorney General of Texas, Hogg helped strengthen public respect for law enforcement. This proclamation issues a reward for the capture of fugitive Jim Jones.


Signed hand-written proclamation. Quarantine proclamation, May 1, 1894.

Quarantine proclamation, May 1, 1894. Texas Governor James Stephen Hogg records, Box 301-144. Image 1, Image 2, Image 3, Image 4, Image 5, and Image 6. Click or tap on image and links and to view larger versions.

Epidemic diseases such as yellow fever, smallpox, and cholera were even more dangerous in a time before medical advances and widespread vaccination. In this proclamation, Governor Hogg declared a quarantine along the Gulf Coast and Rio Grande border on “all vessels, persons, or things” arriving from places known to harbor such diseases.

Signed and typed proclamation. Quarantine proclamation, October 15, 1894.

Quarantine proclamation, October 15, 1894.
Texas Governor James Stephen Hogg records,
Box 301-144. Image 1, Image 2. Click or tap on image and links and to view larger versions.

Epidemic diseases such as yellow fever, smallpox, and cholera were even more dangerous in a time before medical advances and widespread vaccination. In this proclamation, Governor Hogg rescinded the quarantine he had imposed earlier that year along the Gulf Coast and Rio Grande border on “all vessels, persons, or things” arriving from places known to harbor such diseases.

Commemorative plate a design of trees on the outer edge. Governor Hogg commemorative plate, 1951.


Governor Hogg commemorative plate, 1951. Artifacts Collection, ATF0016a. Click or tap on image to view larger version.

The Daughters of the Republic of Texas (DRT) commissioned this plate in 1951 to commemorate the centennial of James Hogg’s birth.



Photograph of Hogg sitting on a rock outside. James Stephen Hogg, undated. Image 1/102-236, Prints and Photographs.

James Stephen Hogg, undated. Image 1/102-236, Prints and Photographs.

This undated photo of Hogg gives something of the personality of the man. As a young man, Hogg had been shot in the back by outlaws and lived to tell about it. As governor, he created the Railroad Commission to protect the public interest against powerful corporations. The first progressive—and the first native-born Texan—to serve as Texas governor, Hogg once told an audience, "Let us have Texas, the Empire State, governed by the people; not Texas, the truck-patch, ruled by corporate lobbyists."
 


Portrait of C.W. Raines, undated. Image 1/102-466, Prints and Photographs. 

Portrait of C.W. Raines, undated. Image 1/102-466, Prints and Photographs. 

Governor Hogg encouraged educational institutions at all levels, including the Texas State Library. In 1891 he appointed C.W. Raines to the position of state librarian, an important step forward for the library since it had been mostly destroyed in the Capitol fire of 1881. Governor Hogg supported an annual appropriation of $500 to begin a collection of Texas historical data, and under Raines’ tenure (1891-1895, 1899-1906) the State Library began collecting its current valuable historical holdings.
 

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Page last modified: September 16, 2022