Staff Pick — John — THAT TERRIBLE TEXAS WEATHER: TALES OF STORMS, DROUGHT, DESTRUCTION, AND PERSEVERANCE, by Johnny D. Boggs, DT 07156

It’s been said that Texas has four seasons: drought, flood, blizzard, and twister.

There’s some truth in that.  But like root canals and head cheese, bad weather is something I’d rather read about than experience.

That’s the beauty of Johnny D. Boggs’ THAT TERRIBLE TEXAS WEATHER: TALES OF STORMS, DROUGHT, DESTRUCTION, AND PERSEVERANCE (DT 07156).  Boggs puts the reader in the middle of stifling droughts, deadly floods, and fearsome storms—but firmly out of harm’s way.  Just the way I like it.

Boggs shares true-life stories of calamitous Texas weather, from the 1882 Ben Ficklin flood and the blizzard of 1886 to the heartbreaking 1987 Saragosa tornado.  Weathering frigid blue northers and dodging softball-sized hail, Boggs highlights unsung Texans who meet death and devastation with courage and heroism.

THAT TERRIBLE TEXAS WEATHER is spiked with delicious nuggets of Texas history.  We meet the utopian namesakes of Reunion Tower in Dallas.  We learn why San Angelo, not Santa Angela, is the seat of Tom Green county.  And we discover the blessings—and the curses—of drift fences.  Boggs even explores the U. S Department of Agriculture’s “concussive” 1891 rainmaking experiment.

Boggs writes award-winning western novels, but he cut his teeth as a sportswriter in Dallas and Fort Worth.  His experience as a reporter is evident in his tight writing and eye for telling detail.  Boggs also displays a novelist’s gift for infusing his narrative with incisive slivers of humanity.

An undercurrent that flows through THAT TERRIBLE TEXAS WEATHER is the certainty that no matter how dire the circumstances, Texans don’t lose faith in the future.  They find the resilience and grit to rebuild and recover.  Resilience and grit are still core Texan attributes.  Even in the wake of Hurricane Harvey, Texans continue to persevere despite that terrible Texas weather.

NLS Annotation:  Through a collection of newspaper reports and eyewitness accounts of victims caught up in some of the most devastating weather Texas has ever produced, this is a sampler of Texas weather through the years.  From the hurricanes of Indianola and Galveston to the tornado at Wichita Falls to the drought and heat wave of 1998, these are the stories of the people who perished and the people who endured, and of their Texas-sized courage and heroism.  Contains some violence.

A sampling of Johnny Boggs’ western fiction includes HARD WINTER: A WESTERN STORY (DB 72627); ONCE THEY WORE THE GRAY (DB 80003); SPARK ON THE PRAIRIE: A GUNS AND GAVEL NOVEL (DB 64703); and PURGATOIRE (DB 73519).

More information about author Johnny D. Boggs is at: http://www.johnnydboggs.com/

A classic account of terrible Texas weather is THE TIME IT NEVER RAINED (DB 49217), by the incomparable Elmer Kelton.  Although a work of fiction, it’s rooted in Kelton’s lived experiences during the 1950s drought.  (Kelton makes cameo appearances in THAT TERRIBLE TEXAS WEATHER.)

ISAAC’S STORM: A MAN, A TIME, AND THE DEADLIEST HURRICANE IN HISTORY (DB 48811), by Erik Larson, is a riveting account of the Great Galveston Hurricane of 1900.

Larson discusses ISAAC’S STORM at the 1999 Texas Book Festival: https://www.c-span.org/video/?153573-1/isaacs-storm.

Al Roker of “The Today Show” offers a fresh look the Galveston Hurricane in THE STORM OF THE CENTURY: TRAGEDY, HEROISM, SURVIVAL, AND THE EPIC TRUE STORY OF AMERICA’S DEADLIEST NATURAL DISASTER: THE GREAT GULF HURRICANE OF 1900 (DB 85045).

Texas figures prominently in THE WORST HARD TIME: THE UNTOLD STORY OF THOSE WHO SURVIVED THE GREAT AMERICAN DUST BOWL (DR 01742), by Timothy Egan.

Dig deeper into the American Dust Bowl with author Egan: https://www.c-span.org/video/?200420-1/the-worst-hard-time.

Experience “Surviving the Dust Bowl”: https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/dustbowl/

WHAT STANDS IN A STORM: THREE DAYS IN THE WORST SUPERSTORM TO HIT THE SOUTH’S TORNADO ALLEY (DB 83439) is a nonfiction weather thriller.  Author Kim Cross chronicles the swatch of 757 tornadoes that ravaged the South in April 2011.

Staff Pick — John — A WALK IN THE WOODS: REDISCOVERING AMERICA ON THE APPALACHIAN TRAIL, by Bill Bryson, DB 46519

I recently spent a week in northern Minnesota.  When I wasn’t not-catching fish, listening to loons, or feeding the mosquitoes, I spent quite a bit of time walking in the woods.  It was wonderful.  Breathing air that didn’t taste like car exhaust was different, but I got used to it.

Spending time in nature—whether walking in the woods, puttering in the backyard, or strolling in a park—is good for the body.  And the mind.  And the soul.  Being outdoors activates what’s known as the “happiness effect.”

Even a 15-minute walk in the woods—or on the prairie—helps you relax and offers a much-needed break from the chaos and noise of the “real” world.  John Muir got it right when he said, “of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt.”

Travel writer Bill Bryson takes Muir at his word.  Having hiked a good bit of England, Bryson stumbles upon an outcropping of the Appalachian Trail (AT) near his home in New Hampshire and decides to tackle “the granddaddy of long hikes.”

Stephen Katz, a ne’er-do-well friend from Des Moines, volunteers to accompany Bryson, and the “waddlesome” duo hit the trail at Springer Mountain, Georgia, intent on hiking the Trail’s rugged 2,190 miles to Mount Katahdin, Maine.

it’s immediately clear that they have no business on the AT.  Woefully unprepared for its rigors, they come to their senses in the Great Smoky Mountains of Tennessee and abandon the lunacy of hiking the entire Trail.  They hopscotch their way via cab and rental car to Virginia, where they hike a more agreeable stretch of the Trail in the Blue Ridge Mountains, before suspending their odyssey.

Smitten with the AT, Bryson continues hiking abbreviated stretches of it on his own.  He samples the Trail in Pennsylvania (home of the meanest rattlesnakes on the AT), climbs Kittatinny Mountain, and survives the deceptively deadly slopes of Mount Washington.

Months later, Bryson and Katz resume hiking the AT in the notorious Hundred-Mile Wilderness of Maine.  Katz gets hopelessly lost, and they mercifully decide to call it a hike.  Later, mellowed by cream soda, they conclude that although they didn’t hike the Appalachian Trail, they DID hike the Appalachian Trail.

By turns whimsical, scholarly, cantankerous, and philosophical, Bryson paints a thoughtful portrait of the Appalachian Trail, recounting its curious history and uncertain future.  He mourns the passing of the “massively graceful” American chestnut and marvels at the astounding biological richness of the Great Smoky Mountains.  Bryson even knits together earthquakes, Alaskan glaciers, and swimming pools in Texas.

Like the best guides, Bryson leads us on surprising and offbeat detours.  We glimpse Stonewall Jackson, meet house proud loons, and explore the strange, sad town of Centralia, PA.  We also meet some of the Trail’s abundant wildlife, from hellbender salamanders to “dopily unassuming” moose.

Zoologist Desmond Morris observed that “the city is not a concrete jungle, it is a human zoo.”  A WALK IN THE WOODS is an invitation to escape that zoo, and Bryson is a worthy companion.  Just don’t get him started on cabbies in Gatlinburg, TN.

 

NLS Annotation: Bryson relates the adventures and misadventures of two totally unfit hikers as he and longtime friend Stephen Katz traverse the 2,100-mile Appalachian Trail.  Returning from more than twenty years in Britain, he set out to rediscover his homeland, but the two men find themselves awed by the terrain and stymied by the unfamiliar local culture.  Bestseller.  Some strong language.  1998.

For information about the 2015 movie adaptation, “A Walk in the Woods,” starring Robert Redford and Nick Nolte: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1178665/?ref_=fn_al_tt_3

Hike back in time and enjoy a June 1998 book talk by Bill Bryson at Olsson’s Books and Records in Washington, DC: https://www.c-span.org/video/?105484-1/walk-woods

An amazing and altogether different real-life tale of hiking the Appalachian Trail is GRANDMA GATEWOOD’S WALK: THE INSPIRING STORY OF THE WOMAN WHO SAVED THE APPALACHIAN TRAIL, by Ben Montgomery:

Biography of Emma Gatewood (1887-1973), who left her family in Ohio in May 1955, saying only that she was going for a walk.  Four months later she completed a solo hike of the Appalachian Trail, from south to north—the first woman to do so.  Details her trip and subsequent celebrity.  2014.  BR 21504 / DB 80502

Tom Ryan covers heartwarming New England terrain in FOLLOWING ATTICUS: FORTY-EIGHT HIGH PEAKS, ONE LITTLE DOG, AND AN EXTRAORDINARY FRIENDSHIP (DB 74367).

The Appalachian Trail’s treacherous West Coast cousin is the star of WILD: FROM LOST TO FOUND ON THE PACIFIC CREST TRAIL, by Cheryl Strayed.  (DB 80502).

 

Staff Pick — John — JUNCTION BOYS: HOW TEN DAYS IN HELL WITH BEAR BRYANT FORGED A CHAMPIONSHIP TEAM, by Jim Dent, DT 07156

Are you ready for some Football?

Of course, you are.  The only thing bigger than Football in Texas is Texas itself.

Football season is finally here.  Fans have lots of options when it comes to reading about gridiron glory.  A hard-nosed, old-school book about Football and Texas is JUNCTION BOYS: HOW TEN DAYS IN HELL WITH BEAR BRYANT FORGED A CHAMPIONSHIP TEAM, by Jim Dent.

Hired in 1954 to revive Texas A&M’s moribund football program, Paul “Bear” Bryant decided to “separate the quitters from the keepers.”  In the midst of an historic drought, Bryant took 115 Aggie football players to the Hill Country town of Junction for preseason training camp.  10 days later, only 35 players remained.

Brutal doesn’t being to describe what the players endured.  The practice “field” was a rock-strewn, goathead-encrusted patch of sunbaked dirt.  Temperatures soared well beyond 100°, but Bryant forbade water breaks.  One player nearly died of heatstroke.

After returning to College Station, the survivors battled through a 1-9 season. Two years later, they were undefeated Southwest Conference champions.  Bryant not only revived the football program, he may have saved the University itself.

After the 1957 season, Bryant left Texas A&M and returned to his alma mater, the University of Alabama.  The rest is history.  Bryant won six National Championships at Alabama and is considered the greatest college football coach of all time.

But despite all those glorious Crimson Tide championship teams, that gritty 1954 Texas A&M squad was his favorite.  Bear loved the “Junction Boys.”

With cameo appearances by Bonnie & Clyde,the Chicken Ranch, Elvis Presley, and a hay bale stuffed with $10,000 in hundred-dollar bills, JUNCTION BOYS: HOW TEN DAYS IN HELL WITH BEAR BRYANT FORGED A CHAMPIONSHIP TEAM is a treasure for college football fans and Texas History buffs alike.

NLS Annotation: The story of Coach Paul “Bear” Bryant’s legendary training camp in 1954 in the small town of Junction, Texas. In a move that many consider the salvation of the Texas A&M football program, Coach Bryant put 115 players through the most grueling practices ever imagined. Only a handful of players survived the entire ten days, but they turned a floundering football team into one of the nation’s best. Strong language.  1999.

If you view football through burnt orange glasses and prefer a 24-letter alphabet (no A&M, please), turn your Eyes of Texas toward THE DARRELL ROYAL STORY (DT 02830) by Jimmy Banks; or BLEEDING ORANGE: TROOULBE AND TRIUMOH DEEP IN THE HEART OF TEXAS (DT  5515), by John Maher.  Another amazing story of Texans and football is TWELVE MIGHTY ORPHANS: The Inspiring True Story of the Mighty Mites Who Ruled Texas Football (DT 07025), also by Jim Dent.

Elmer Kelton’s novel, THE TIME IT NEVER RAINED (DB 49217; LB 03803), is a superb account of the of the 1950s drought that ravaged west Texas.

Catch a peek of the 2002 television movie, “The Junction Boys,” starring Tom Berenger as Bear Bryant, here: http://www.espn.com/eoe/junctionboys/index.html.

 

Bill Gates’ 2018 Summer Reading List

Bill Gates, founder of Microsoft, announced his summer reading list for 2018. The Texas Talking Book Program has most of them in our collection. This year many of his selections deal with the big questions in life. Although these books deal with some heavy topics, he stresses that most of them are fairly short in length.

For more information directly from Bill Gates himself: https://www.gatesnotes.com/About-Bill-Gates/Summer-Books-2018?WT.mc_id=00_00_00_share_fb

The books in TBP’s collection:

Title: LEONARDO DA VINCI
Author: ISAACSON, WALTER

Author of Steve Jobs (DB 73682) chronicles the life of the iconic Renaissance man, Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519). Examines his early life in Vinci, artistic pursuits, patronage from leading Italian Renaissance families, engineering projects, investigations into human anatomy, and more. Bestseller. 2017.

DB   89588

Title: EVERYTHING HAPPENS FOR A REASON: AND OTHER LIES I’VE LOVED
Author: BOWLER, KATE

Theologian specializing in the history of American prosperity gospel examines this faith tradition and draws parallels to her personal battle with stage IV colon cancer in her mid-thirties. Discusses her own medical treatments, her faith journey, and the ways the prosperity gospel has infiltrated secular American life. Unrated. Commercial audiobook. Bestseller. 2018.

DB   90181

Title: LINCOLN IN THE BARDO: A NOVEL
Author: SAUNDERS, GEORGE

1862. One night, soon after the death of his eleven-year-old son, Willie, President Abraham Lincoln goes to visit the recently interred body in Georgetown. There, he encounters the ghosts of the cemetery’s residents, including Willie, who must escape the limbo he is in. Commercial audiobook. Bestseller. Strong language, some violence, and some descriptions of sex. 2017.

DB   86941

Title: FACTFULNESS: TEN REASONS WE’RE WRONG ABOUT THE WORLD – AND WHY THINGS ARE BETTER THAN YOU THINK
Author: ROSLING, HANS

A statistician and medical doctor believes most people hold mistaken ideas unsupported by facts about global issues such as poverty, education, and the environment. He explains that instincts and biases distort our perspective, and we don’t know what we don’t know. Unrated. Commercial audiobook. Bestseller. 2018.

DB 91120

July 2018 TBP Book Club Title Announced!

Texas Talking Book patrons: please join us on Tuesday July 24th at 7 pm (Central Time) for our book club discussion of MY GRANDMOTHER ASKED ME TO TELL YOU SHE’S SORRY by Fredrik Backman (DB 83204)

Our book club meetings are hosted via toll free conference call, so all you need is a telephone to participate. To RSVP call the Talking Book Program at: 1-800-252-9605 (RSVP preferred by June 26st) or email us at: tbp.ral@tsl.texas.gov. Please indicate if you would like us to mail you the digital cartridge or if you prefer to download it from BARD.

We request that everyone remember the following:

  • Keep external distractions to a minimum.
  • Be courteous. Try not to interrupt or talk over others; give everyone a chance to talk; be respectful of differing opinions.
  • Keep discussion points concise and relevant to the book.
  • If comfortable doing so, please preface your comments with your first name.

NLS Annotation:
Seven-year-old Elsa is acknowledged as weird. The grandmother she lives with is flat-out crazy, but she shares tales of the fairyland of Miamas. When her grandmother dies, Elsa is entrusted with delivering letters of apology and learns about her place in the world. Translated from the original 2013 Swedish edition. 2014

Staff Pick – Laura Jean– BLACK RIVER by S. M. Hulse: BR 20669, DB 80695

Do you enjoy psychological fiction with flawed but sympathetic characters set amidst the backdrop of the modern West? You might enjoy BLACK RIVER, by S. M. Hulse. Leisurely paced with a strong sense of place, Black River won the 2015 Reading the West Book Award and was nominated for the Center for Fiction First Novel Prize in 2015.

NLS Annotation: Wes Carver has not returned to Black River since he was held hostage in a prison riot while serving as a corrections officer. Now his former captor, Bobby Williams, is up for release, and Wes must consider what he believes and whether he can let Williams walk away. Some violence and some strong language. 2014.

If you have already read this book, or simply enjoy modern westerns told in a lyrical style that delve into the thoughts of the characters, you might also enjoy The Plainsong series by Kent Haruf.

Books About Wildlife and the True Meaning of Spring

Winter is over, and spring is finally here. People are starting to plan trips to parks, hiking spots, public pools, or just making time to sun themselves in their back yards. Spring fun also has a lot to do with experiencing wildlife, but even if we’re outdoor-types there are only so many kinds of animals we get to have contact with, especially if we live in a city. Most of us don’t get to pet a littler of wolf-pups or witness a band of wild horses, but thankfully we can read about them. Experience spring fully by checking out these wonderful books about animals, their life-cycle, and their environment.

WILD THINGS, WILD PLACES: ADVENTUROUS TALES OF WILDLIFE AND CONSERVATION ON PLANET EARTH by JANE ALEXANDER  DB   86016

Actress, conservationist, and author of Command Performance (DB 51526) examines the field of animal conservation. Discusses scientists researching the animals and their environments, her own travels to locations, and efforts to preserve conditions for the flourishing of future generations, both human and animal. Commercial audiobook. 2016.

FASTEST THINGS ON WINGS: RESCUING HUMMINGBIRDS IN HOLLYWOOD by TERESA E. MASEAR        DB   85238

Hummingbird rescue-and-rehabilitation organizer recounts a five-month period in 2008 when she took in 160 birds. Describes the lessons she learned from individual birds, particularly Gabriel and Pepper, male and female Anna’s, who came in a month apart and developed a bond. 2015.

CALL OF THE OSPREY by DOROTHY HINSHAW PATENT       DB   82388

Follows a crew of scientists who are involved in the Montana Osprey Project–which studies the effects of mercury pollution on wildlife and humans. Highlights observations from spying on the raptors with several strategically placed webcams and the continuing research efforts aimed at better understanding of environmental problems. For grades 6-9. 2015

SECRET WORLD OF RED WOLVES: THE FIGHT TO SAVE NORTH AMERICA’S OTHER WOLF by T. DELENE BEELAND       DB   82537

Examination of conservation efforts for the red wolf. Discusses the status of the red wolf population in the early twenty-first century, their natural history, and a prognosis for their future. Profiles research studies and the Fish and Wildlife Service’s Red Wolf Recovery Program in North Carolina. 2013.

WILD HORSE SCIENTISTS by KAY FRYDENBORG         DB   76337

Discusses wild horses that reside on Assateague Island National Seashore, a barrier island between Virginia and Maryland. Details their diet, physical characteristics, life cycles, and behavior, including their interactions with humans. Explains the steps taken to control overpopulation. Contains a glossary and resources. For grades 5-8 and older readers. 2012.

ELEPHANT WHISPERER: MY LIFE WITH THE HERD IN THE AFRICAN WILD by LAWRENCE ANTHONY    DB 85906

Conservationist relates his experiences caring for a rogue herd of elephants on his South African game reserve. Describes his misgivings in accepting them, challenges faced with both the herd and local communities, lessons learned from individual elephants, and the joys and sorrows he encountered. 2009.

VOICES IN THE OCEAN: A JOURNEY INTO THE WILD AND HAUNTING WORLD OF DOLPHINS by SUSAN CASEY   DB 82327

Recounts author’s two-year global adventure exploring the nature of dolphins and their interactions with humans. Examines the careers of others who work with dolphins and communities in which dolphins play interesting roles. Discusses how they are mistreated by the captivity industry. Commercial audiobook. Some violence, some strong language, and some descriptions of sex. 2010.

TIGER: A TRUE STORY OF VENGEANCE AND SURVIVAL by JOHN VAILLANT      DB 74579
Nature writer follows a government tiger-control team as it pursues an endangered Siberian tiger, which had killed a poacher, through Russia’s far east in the winter of 1997. Explores the beauty of the setting, the tiger’s strength, and the political and geographical forces that shaped this remote region. 2010.

ELEPHANT TALK: THE SURPRISING SCIENCE OF ELEPHANT COMMUNICATION by ANN DOWNER   DB 73966
Discusses elephant evolution, society, and body language. Explains field researchers’ use of observation and high-tech recording equipment to shed light on the role communication plays in the herd. Includes facts about the elephant’s status as an endangered species. For grades 5-8 and older readers. 2011.

Books to sharpen your self-reliance skills

When we need something — food, clothes, tools, fuel -pretty much anything, we go buy it or we order it on-line. As a society we buy enormous amounts of stuff to cover every necessity and satisfy every desire. Have you asked yourself: what if we were suddenly unable to purchase the things we want or need? Our great-grandparents probably did not see that as an insurmountable problem because they had skills that made them, if not completely autonomous, a lot less reliant on having to buy things; but most of us have forgotten that knowledge.

Fortunately, we can still get some of that information from books, and we have some of them at TBP. Our titles instruct on forgotten skills like surviving in the wild, growing and preserving food, keeping animals, and making some of your own stuff. Check out these titles and you’ll never ever need to purchase anything again! Just kidding; you’ll still need to buy stuff, but you’ll learn useful info and maybe you’ll save some bucks in the process.

SELF-SUFFICIENT GARDENER: A COMPLETE GUIDE TO GROWING AND PRESERVING All YOUR OWN FOOD by JOHN SEYMOUR    DB   21141

Includes vegetables, fruits, and herbs and provides information on soil, climate, cultivation, pests and diseases, harvesting, and storing. Also explains how to salt, dry, pickle, can, or freeze produce.

WHAT CAN YOU DO WITH AN OLD RED SHOE? A GREEN ACTIVITY BOOK ABOUT REUSE by ALTER, ANNA   DB   69070

Suggests projects kids and adults can do together to recycle everyday objects–a leftover flip-flop; a worn-out T-shirt, blanket, or shower curtain; tin cans–and turn them into something new. An old red shoe becomes a flower-pot container. Includes general tips on reuse and recycling to prevent waste. For grades 2-4.

MADE FROM SCRATCH: DISCOVERING THE PLEASURES OF A HANDMADE LIFE by JENNA WOGINRICH      DB 68581

Woginrich, a young web designer and homestead blogger, provides suggestions for adopting a self-sufficient lifestyle. She discusses keeping chickens, bees, and rabbits; putting house dogs to work; growing and making food; acquiring old, but useful, items; and making clothing and music. Includes recipes.

LOST ART OF READING NATURE’S SIGNS: USE OUTDOOR CLUES TO FIND YOUR WAY, PREDICT THE WEATHER, LOCATE WATER, TRACK ANIMALS–AND OTHER FORGOTTEN SKILLS by TRISTAN GOOLEY           DB 83474

Professional navigator and travel company executive shares the tips and tricks he has learned over his twenty years of experience about orienting yourself in both urban and rural environments using nature’s clues. Includes information on using your senses, identifying landmarks big and small, and ways different environments affect indicators.

HOW TO SH*T IN THE WOODS: AN ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND APPROACH TO A LOST ART by KATHLEEN MEYER  DB   31791

The author, a long-time outdoors-woman, offers advice on how to relieve oneself when conventional restrooms are unavailable.  Meyer explains not only how to do it with dignity and comfort, but also with environmental awareness.  She includes a chapter especially for women.

ABOMAN’S GUIDE TO SURVIVAL AND SELF-RELIANCE: PRACTICAL SKILLS FOR INTERESTING TIMES by JOSEPH A. BIGLEY     DB 56439

Advice on how to deal with challenges presented by unexpected equipment breakdowns, weather disasters, and other such events. The manual contains information on preparing for emergencies, troubleshooting household problems, and maintaining health through alternative medicine and herbal remedies. Also highlights wilderness survival skills.

CHEAPSKATE NEXT DOOR: THE SURPRISING SECRETS OF AMERICANS
LIVING HAPPILY BELOW THEIR MEANS by JEFF YEAGER DB 72384

Provides practical advice and tips on ways to live on less than you earn. Suggests a change in attitude about money, possessions, and life.

MARCH 2018 BOOK CLUB TITLE ANNOUNCED!

Please join us on Tuesday, March 20 at 7 pm (Central Time) for our Book Club discussion of HILLBILLY ELEGY: A MEMOIR OF A FAMILY AND CULTURE IN CRISIS, by J. D. Vance (DB   85796, LB   08948).

We host our Book Club meetings via toll free conference call.  All you need to participate is a telephone!

To RSVP call the Talking Book Program at 1-800-252-9605.  or email us at tbp.ral@tsl.texas.gov.  (RSVP preferred by January 4.)

HILLBILLY ELEGY is available by mail in digital cartridge or large print formats.  It is also available to download on BARD.

Please indicate if you would like us to mail you the digital cartridge, large print book, or if you prefer to download it from BARD.

HILLBILLY ELEGY: A MEMOIR OF A FAMILY AND CULTURE IN CRISIS

J. D. Vance

DB 85796, LB 08948

Memoir of growing up in the Ohio Rust Belt in a family culture rooted in Scots-Irish Appalachia. Explores political themes affecting these community cultures through the lens of personal and familial experiences. Discusses what it took to go from nearly failing high school to graduating from Yale Law School. Some strong language.  Bestseller.  2016.

We look forward to having you join us on Tuesday, March 20th!

Staff Pick – Laura Jean– AGAINST THE TIDE by Elizabeth Camden, DB 77493

Do you enjoy Christian Historical fiction with a romantic twist? You might enjoy AGAINST THE TIDE by Elizabeth Camden. Winner of both the RITA Award for romantic fiction and the Christy Award for Christian fiction, this suspenseful and atmospheric novel follows immigrant and translator, Lydia as she struggles with her beliefs and the persistent problems caused by her tumultuous childhood. She also wrestles with her growing attraction to Lieutenant Banebridge, “Bane”, a man with a difficult past of his own.

againstthetide

NLS Annotation: Boston, 1891. Lydia Pallas works as a translator for the Navy Yard. When Lieutenant Alexander Banebridge requires Lydia’s skills for a case, she becomes his assistant. As Lydia is drawn deeper into Bane’s mission to end the opium trade, a relationship develops between them. RITA Award, Christy Award. 2012.

Set in Boston during the last decade of the 19th century, Ms. Camden describes the role that the legal opium trade played at this time in the United States. It was a fascinating backdrop against which to set Lydia and Bane’s story.

If you already read this book or simply enjoy gentle historical romances with an independent female lead in an urban setting, you might try the RITA Award winner for 2016, TIFFANY GIRL by Deeanne Gist, DB 83138.