Archival Animals

By Caroline Jones, Reference Archivist

Enjoy watching cat videos? Follow any cute pugs on Instagram? It feels like every day we see friends posting selfies with their pets or videos of their pets, and even creating social media accounts for their pets. It is clear we love our animal friends, and based on some finds in our archival collections, it appears that we have always loved them. Here are a few highlights from our collections that are cute, funny, and simply adorable images of some pets in the archives:

Before they ruled the internet, cats stole our hearts in these family albums:

Robert Jasper Hunnicutt, Elizabeth H. Stroud (center), and sitting on a porch holding kittens

Robert Jasper Hunnicutt, Elizabeth H. Stroud (center), and sitting on a porch holding kittens. Citation: 1968/029-75, J.R. Hunnicutt collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Doris Ruth Hunnicutt, crouching holding a cat. Citation: 1968/029-340, J.R. Hunnicutt collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Mary Lowry with cat, Black Bess

Mary Lowry with cat, Black Bess. Citation: 1946/1-38, Reynolds Lowry – Thomas F. McKinney Collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Man seated on porch in rocking chair with cat.

Man seated on porch in rocking chair with cat. Citation: 1995.112-60, Clyde and Thelma See glass plate negatives collection. Sam Houston Regional Library and Research Center, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.]

Man’s best friend has always been like a member of the family:

Unidentified young child with bulldog

Unidentified young child with bulldog. Citation: 73.2222.122, Samuel Bell Maxey photograph collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Woman posing with dog

Woman posing with dog. Citation: 1964/306-1675, Photographs, Graham (R. Niles) collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Dog sleeping on porch

Dog sleeping on porch. Citation: 1964/306-1676, Photographs, Graham (R. Niles) collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

A couple of children with a couple of dogs

A couple of children with a couple of dogs. Citation: 1976/031-10, William Deming Hornaday photograph collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

A little girl and a dog

A little girl and a dog. Citation: 1976/031-16, William Deming Hornaday photograph collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Child with dog

Child with dog. Citation: 2011/348-20.95, Miscellaneous photographs, Photographs, Richard Bachman collection. Archives and Information Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

3 puppies in front of the J.T. Young Home

Three puppies in front of the J.T. Young Home. Citation: 1970/101-156, Fannie Ratchford photograph collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Couple with small dog

Couple with small dog. Citation: 2001078_005_70_080_023ac, Fields, Farms, and Landscapes, Texas Department of Agriculture photograph collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Even these unlikely animal friends have gotten into the spirit:

Governor O'Daniel and Cuero turkey

Governor O’Daniel and Cuero turkey. Citation: 1976/008-593, Photographic and film media, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Cowboy with parrot

Cowboy with parrot. Citation: 1991077_704_084ac, Attractions, Activities, and Events, Audiovisual material, Texas Tourist Development Agency. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Couple with peacock outside Mission San Jose

Couple with peacock outside Mission San Jose. Citation: 1991077_105_041ac, Forts, Parks, and Historic Sites, Audiovisual material, Texas Tourist Development Agency. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Our photograph collections include original photographs, born digital images, and digitized versions of original photographs. Many of the images included in this post are digitized and accessible through the Texas Digital Archives, the Texas State Archives Flickr, and our online exhibits page. For more information on accessing images currently unavailable through the web, please contact the Reference Desk by phone or email at 512-463-5455 or ref@tsl.texas.gov.

As a bonus, here are some more recent images of a familiar face with some unusual guests at the Texas Capitol!

Governor Perry with penguin

Governor Perry with penguin. Citation: Penguin2, Photographs, Texas Governor Rick Perry Press Office media files. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.]

Governor Perry with snake

Governor Perry with snake. Citation: Snake, Photographs, Texas Governor Rick Perry Press Office media files. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

In Remembrance – Tony Black

By Jessica Tucker, Archivist

On September 21, 2017, the Texas State Library and Archives Commission (TSLAC) lost of one of its greatest treasuresTony Black, longtime archivist, coworker, and friend, following a brief illness. Tony faithfully served the state of Texas for over 35 years. Beginning in 1981 as a typist and receptionist in the Library Development Division, Tony eventually became an appraisal and processing archivist at TSLAC, dividing his time between assessing the historical value of state agency records (such those of the Texas Adjutant General, the Comptroller of Public Accounts, and the Secretary of State) and arranging and describing a wide variety of archival records ranging from the Howard Hughes estate litigation papers to the gubernatorial records of Governors George W. Bush and Rick Perry. In addition to Tony’s extensive work with the records of the Adjutant General, the Comptroller of Public Accounts, and the Department of Human Services, there are finding aids written by Tony on Texas Archival Resources Online (TARO) for the records of over 30 other state agencies. (These finding aids are available online at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/taro/browse/browse_tslac1.html.)

Tony Black with an unidentified group of students touring the State Archives, 2017, Archives and Information Services Division records.

Tony Black with an unidentified group of students touring the State Archives, 2017, Archives and Information Services Division records.

Tony was always a bright spot in the halls of TSLAC, known for his good nature and humor. When named Employee of the Quarter in 2012, one coworker described him as “…one of the nicest, most helpful individuals I have ever met… He is not the type of person to ever make you feel that your question is silly, or not important, or that you are bothering him with it. This consideration and warm approachability extends to everyone in the agency, including members of other divisions and patrons.” Others commented on “the amazing depth and breadth of his knowledge of [TSLAC’s] records.” Another colleague remarked that the only time she had ever seen Tony angry was when he was accidentally locked in the stack for a few hours on a Friday afternoon over a decade ago. Tony frequently recounted this cautionary tale to new employees with a laugh, throwing up his hands in his characteristic gesture of amused bafflement.

Tony Black with other State Archives staff members during a disaster recovery exercise, 2006, Archives and Information Services Division records.

Tony Black with other State Archives staff members during a disaster recovery exercise, 2006, Archives and Information Services Division records.

Born in Roswell, New Mexico, and raised in El Paso, Texas, Tony’s passion for history began early. Tony received a B.A. in history from the University of Texas at El Paso in 1968, and followed by an M.A. in medieval history from the University of Texas at Austin in 1970. After a year in Spain, researching the socio-economic structure of Vic (a Catalan city) during the 1390s, Tony returned to El Paso to teach United States history, where he met and married his wife, Carole. Tony never lost his love of teaching. After the couple returned to Austin, Tony began teaching U.S. History at Austin Community College, which he continued to do while employed full time at TSLAC. Tony began work at the Texas State Library and Archives Commission in the Library Development Division in 1981. He then worked briefly in the Secretary of State’s office, administering one of the ethics laws for the Campaign and Ethics section of the Elections Division, followed by a job editing the Texas Administrative Code for the Texas Register Division, but he returned to TSLAC in 1984.

Tony was devoted to his wife Carole, sister Pam, and his much-discussed dogs. He was also known for lovely cello playing during the annual TSLAC holiday fundraiser.

Justifiably proud of his work at TSLAC, Tony once exclaimed to a researcher, “I have the perfect job!” His legacy is clear in his many processing and appraisal projects, the archivists he mentored, and the researchers he helped.

 

 

Angelina Fires Her Cannon: The Archives War of 1842-1843

By Anna Reznik, Archivist

In the early hours of December 30, 1842, a group of men lead by Colonel Thomas I. Smith and Captain Eli Chandler began loading Republic of Texas’ government archives into wagons. Smith and Chandler had instructions from President Sam Houston to move the records for safekeeping.

In Houston’s eyes, the advancing Mexican army made Austin unsafe. Earlier in 1842, Houston instructed the government to move to a safer location. Government officials began operating from Washington-on-the-Brazos; however, the archives remained in Austin. In December 1842, the president ordered men to move the archives.

Citation: File No. 1713, “To Arm! To Arms! Texians!!” broadside warning citizens of Austin of the approaching Mexican Army, March 5, 1842, Texas General Land Office incoming correspondence, 2015/087-7.

Citation: File No. 1713, “To Arm! To Arms! Texians!!” broadside warning citizens of Austin of the approaching Mexican Army, March 5, 1842, Texas General Land Office incoming correspondence, 2015/087-7. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission

In the eyes of Austin citizens, Houston’s orders were an excuse to move the capital away from a city the president disliked. Many felt that Houston’s peace negotiations with Native American peoples made Austin safer than it had been previously.

Citation: A Texas scrap-book: made up of the history, biography, and miscellany of Texas and its people by Baker, D. W. C., 976.4 B17s 1875.

Citation: A Texas scrap-book: made up of the history, biography, and miscellany of Texas and its people by Baker, D. W. C., 976.4 B17s 1875. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Under the cover of darkness, Smith, Chandler, and twenty men loaded three wagons before widow Angelina Eberly realized the implications of the archives leaving Austin. To alert other Austinites, Eberly fired a cannon outside her boarding house. Her shot missed the men but hit the General Land Office building. Smith, Chandler, and clerks from the General Land Office fled with three wagons. The vigilantes followed with the cannon. Shortly after, near Brushy Creek, the vigilantes forced Smith and Chandler to surrender. The archives returned to Austin.

This letter, sent to the citizens of Bastrop after the Archives War, states that in the haste of securing the wagons containing the removed records, some archival materials may now be missing. The citizens of Bastrop are urged to search any passing wagons for stolen and missing records.] [Citation: File No. 1757, Letter to the citizens of Bastrop to search wagons, April 12, 1843, Texas General Land Office incoming correspondence, 2015/180-7.

This letter, sent to the citizens of Bastrop after the Archives War, states that in the haste of securing the wagons containing the removed records, some archival materials may now be missing. The citizens of Bastrop are urged to search any passing wagons for stolen and missing records. Citation: File No. 1757, Letter to the citizens of Bastrop to search wagons, April 12, 1843, Texas General Land Office incoming correspondence, 2015/180-7. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Both houses of the legislature investigated the matter.  The House Select Committee stated that Houston requested that the Congress order the archives be removed from Austin, but Congress had refused. The committee also found that Houston had acted beyond his powers in moving the capital to Washington-on-the-Brazos. The full House rejected the committee’s report by a vote of 19 to 18.

Message of his excellency, the president in relation to the removal of the archives to the House of Representatives, January 4, 1843, Andrew Jackson Houston collection, 2-22/184.

Message of his excellency, the president, in relation to the removal of the archives to the House of Representatives, January 4, 1843, Andrew Jackson Houston collection, 2-22/184. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

On January 13, 1843, the Senate Committee on Public Lands recommended that the government should move back to Austin to save taxpayer money. Despite strong words from the legislature, the Republic government continued operating in Washington-on-the-Brazos for two more years.

Without the government, many Austin businesses closed, and the city almost became a ghost town. But the records created before the 1843 remained in Austin. In 1845, Austin once again became the capital, and the government records were united. Five years later, in 1850, Austin became the permanent capital of Texas.

In the 175 years since Angelina fired her cannon, the Archives War has become symbolic of the importance of government records. Archives allow citizens to monitor government operations, understand actions of all three branches of state government, and assist in determining property rights.

The Archives War is reflected in the following materials at the Texas State Library and Archives Commission:

The Andrew Jackson Houston collection contains correspondence to and from Sam Houston throughout his life. Of special interest is an order to remove the archives from Austin and a draft of Houston’s response to Congress’ investigations of the Archives War.

The materials at the center of the Archives War were the Republic’s land records. Though many of Texas’ land records are preserved and maintained at the Texas General Land Office, TSLAC holds the General Land Office’s incoming correspondence from the 19th century. Included in these records are a warning about the Mexican Army in San Antonio, efforts to recover “lost” records, and the government struggling to operate in Washington-on-the-Brazos while the archives remained in Austin.

Our publications collections include books and articles about the Archives War as well as Angelina Eberly and others who played central roles in the Archives War.

Additional publications can be found by searching the library catalog.

Title Author Call number Collection
The Archive War of Texas Jewett, Henry J. 976.404 AR25w Main (non-circulating)
The Archive War in Texas Yager, Hope 976.404 Y103a OVER-T Main (non-circulating)
The Houston Story; A Chronicle of the City of Houston and the Texas Frontier from the Battle of San Jacinto to the War Between the States, 1836-1865 Bartholomew, Ed Ellsworth 976.414 B283 Main (circulating)
A Texas scrap-book: made up of the history, biography, and miscellany of Texas and its people Baker, D. W. C. 976.4 B17s 1875 Main (non-circulating; available online from the Internet Archive)
The Lady Cannoneer: A Biography of Angelina Belle Peyton Eberly, Heroine of the Texas Archives War King, C. Richard 976.404 K58L Main (circulating)
Sam Houston: A Biography of the Father of Texas Williams, John Hoyt 923.273 H818WILJ Main (noncirculating)
Peg Leg: The Improbable Life of a Texas Hero, Thomas William Ward, 1807-1872 Humphrey, David C. 327.73 H884p Main (non-circulating)
Journals of the Senate of the Republic of Texas, 7th Congress Texas. Congress. Senate. L1793.6 J826 7TH Texas Documents (non-circulating; available online from the Legislative Reference Library)
Journals of the House of Representatives of the Republic of Texas, 7th Congress Texas. Congress. House of Representatives. L1791.6 J826 7TH-9TH Texas Documents (non-circulating; available online from the Legislative Reference Library)
Secret journals of the Senate, Republic of Texas, 1836-1845 Texas. Congress. Senate. L1793.6 J826sj 1836-45 Texas Documents (non-circulating; available online from the Legislative Reference Library)
Southwestern Historical Quarterly. (Indexes) Texas State Historical Association 976.406 SO8 INDEX V. 1-107 Reference Reading Room (non-circulating)

For more about the Archives War and its importance to Texas history, check out our website at https://www.tsl.texas.gov/treasures/republic/archwar/archwar.html.

 

 

 

 

Featured Collection: Architecture of Texas and Beyond

By Maria Barker, Library Assistant

The current Featured Collection in the Reference Reading Room, Architecture of Texas and Beyond, covers the stories and history of significant spaces across the US and Mexico. From cabins to sky scrapers, churches to highway visitor centers, the selection gives the interested reader a sense of the qualities that make a structure significant, and how buildings manage to go up and come down over time.

To search for these books and more, check out our catalog at www.tsl.texas.gov/catalog. If you are interested in checking out a title on our Featured Collection shelf, please visit the Reference Desk in room 109. Below is the complete list of titles you’ll find on our Featured Collection shelf this month.

Want to learn more about the Featured and New Book Collections at the Texas State Library and Archives Commission? Check out Maria’s previous post about these displays in the Reference Reading Room.

Title Author Call No. Collection
Alfred Giles : an English architect in Texas and Mexico George, Mary Carolyn Hollers 720.924 G391j MAIN
Architecture in Texas, 1895-1945 Henry, Jay C. 720.9764 H396A MAIN
Building the Lone Star: an illustrated guide to historic sites Baker, T. Lindsay. 917.64 B177B MAIN
Cowtown Moderne : art deco architecture of Fort Worth, Texas Cohen, Judith Singer 725.09764 C66C MAIN
Dallas Architecture, 1936-1986 Tomlinson, Doug 720.9764 T597D MAIN
Dog Trots & Mud Cats : the Texas Log House Lavender, Linda 720.9764 L386D MAIN
Pioneer Texas Buildings; a geometry lesson Heimsath, Clovis 720.9764 H364 MAIN
Presidio, Mission, and Pueblo : Spanish architecture and urbanism in the United States Early, James 720.976 Ea764p MAIN
Restoring Texas : Raiford Stripling’s Life and Architecture McCullar, Michael 720.924 M139R MAIN
Texas Public Buildings of the Nineteenth Century Robinson, Willard Bethurem 720.9764 R568 MAIN
The Architectural Legacy of Alfred Giles : Selected Restorations George, Mary Carolyn Hollers 720.92 G293a MAIN
The People’s Architecture : Texas courthouses, jails, and municipal buildings Robinson, Willard Bethurem 725.15 R568P MAIN
The See-Through Years : creation and destruction in Texas architecture and real estate, 1981-1991 Barna, Joel Warren 720.9764 B252S MAIN
The Texas Courthouse Welch, June Rayfield 725.15 W444 MAIN
Architecture as Revolution : episodes in the history of modern Mexico Carranza, Luis E. Z UA380.8 C231AR Texas Documents
Lone Star steeples : historic places of worship in Texas Christensen, Carl J. Z TA475.8 C462lo Texas Documents
Lost architecture of the Rio Grande Borderlands George, Eugene. Z TA475.8 G293Lo Texas Documents
Master Builder of the Lower Rio Grande : Heinrich Portscheller George, W. Eugene Z TA475.8 G293ma Texas Documents
Modern Architecture in Latin America : art, technology, and utopia Carranza, Luis E. Z UA380.8 C231mo Texas Documents
Sanctioning Modernism : architecture and the making of postwar identities Kulić, Vladimir Z UA380.8 SA559mo Texas Documents
The Alleys and Back Buildings of Galveston : an architectural and social history Beasley, Ellen Z TA475.8 B38AL Texas Documents
The American Idea of Home : conversations about architecture and design Friedman, Bernard Z UA380.8 F914am Texas Documents
The Architecture and Cities of Northern Mexico from Independence to the Present : Tamaulipas, Nuevo León, Coahuila, Chihuahua, Durango, Sonora, Sinaloa, and Baja California Norte and Sur Burian, Edward R. Z UA380.8 B916ar Texas Documents
The Moodys of Galveston and their mansion Wiencek, Henry Z TA475.8 W636mo Texas Documents
Aesthetics in transportation : guidelines for incorporating design, art and architecture into transportation facilities Héder, Lajos TD 1.8:AE 8 U.S. Documents
Examples and ideas to stimulate and improve the design, art & architecture of airports Bowman, Donald P. TD 4.2:AI 7/36 U.S. Documents
Historic America: Buildings, Structures, and Sites LC 1.2:H 62/5 U.S. Documents
Mission 66 visitor centers : the history of a building type. Allaback, Sarah I 29.2:M 69/5 U.S. Documents
Architecture that speaks : S.C.P. Vosper and ten remarkable buildings at Texas A & M McCoy, Nancy T. Z TA475.8 M137ar Texas Documents

 

Meet the Staff – Taylor Fox

Meet the Staff is a Q&A series on Out of the Stacks that highlights the Archives and Information Services staff of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Photograph of Taylor Fox

In 50 words or less, describe what you do.

I’m a Reference Librarian, and I answer questions from people researching or just plain curious about Texas history, government, and culture! I’m the lead for our Genealogy and Main collections, which involves identifying very old books that need maintenance and very new books to collect and make available to researchers.

Why did you choose your profession?

I was a student worker at my university’s library because I heard it was a fun place to work, and figured if I wanted to fully immerse myself in academia, I better understand how to use the library. I started in technical services, then moved to circulation, then to interlibrary loan, where I really found the heart of what libraries are all about: making information available to the public without discrimination or judgment. It’s a wonderful sentiment that speaks strongly to me, and so I pursue it!

What is your favorite document, photo, or artifact in TSLAC’s collection?

This changes over time as I’m exposed to more and more of what TSLAC has to offer, but currently my favorite publication in our collection is a periodical called The Woman’s Viewpoint. This was a female-led periodical published in Houston between 1923 and 1926 which sought to provide a space and vehicle for Texas women to share their opinions “fully, frankly, and fearlessly.” The magazine offered articles on a variety of topics which the editor considered of interest to women: government, politics, and women’s right to vote; environmental concerns; the importance of maintaining good health and recreation; and fashion, movies, music, and other cultural affairs.

Image of The Woman’s Viewpoint, Vol. 1 No. 1 Sterling, Florence M. The Woman’s viewpoint magazine. Houston: Woman's Viewpoint Publishing Co., 1923.

Image of The Woman’s Viewpoint, Vol. 1 No. 1
Sterling, Florence M. The Woman’s viewpoint magazine. Houston: Woman’s Viewpoint Publishing Co., 1923.

One of the reasons I enjoy this periodical so much is because it’s very easy for me to think of Texas in the 1920s the way my family has described it: lots of cows, farms, and not much to do. This magazine transports me to a grander view of Texas: one of daring, educated, urban women dedicated to building strong homes and communities, with the understanding that their voices were critical to the shaping of our state and country.

When you’re not busy what do you like to do for fun?

I play guitar in a prog-rock band called Dream Eater, and enjoy writing, rehearsing, and playing shows around town; come see us! I also practice yoga regularly and occasionally try to lift weights with my husband, a guaranteed good time. My kind of fun involves eating breakfast tacos, drinking coffee, reading, jamming, and hanging out with my crazy cow-dog, Dingo.

Removing Barriers for All: Disability History at the State Archives

By Rebecca Romanchuk, Archivist

December 3 was International Day of Persons with Disabilities, as proclaimed by the United Nations. Observed since 1992, this day “aims to promote the rights and well-being of persons with disabilities in all spheres of society and development, and to increase awareness of the situation of persons with disabilities in every aspect of political, social, economic, and cultural life.” The theme of this day for 2017 is “Transformation towards a sustainable and resilient society for all.”

The State Archives recently uncovered a piece of disability history from 1970 in its holdings among open reel audiotape recordings created by the state legislature. The tapes are of three public hearings held by the Texas Legislative Council Study Committee on Programs for the Handicapped, which conducted a comprehensive study of services and rehabilitative programs for Texans with disabilities, with a focus on vocational needs. These recordings are just a small portion of the archival records we hold that document state agencies and programs that have served those with disabilities since the early 20th century.

Senator Criss Cole shaking hands with a guest using a walker at his Governor for a Day ceremony, January 10, 1970

Senator Criss Cole shaking hands with a guest at his Governor for a Day ceremony, January 10, 1970, 1970/151-36. Current Events Photographic Documentation Program collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

The story of these recordings was featured earlier this year in the Disability Archives/History Consortium newsletter in two parts (part 1 and part 2) and they are available for listening in TSLAC’s Texas Digital Archive, with a companion finding aid on Texas Archival Resources Online. Among the experts testifying was Dr. William Spencer, founder of the Institute for Rehabilitation and Research (TIRR), Texas Medical Center, and a nationally recognized pioneer in rehabilitation, often referred to as the “Father of Modern Rehabilitation.” Senator Barbara Jordan served as the committee’s citizens advisory commission chair and Senator Criss Cole, blinded during World War II, served as a director of the study committee.

The topics discussed are those that continue to be of concern for persons with disabilities today, including structural barriers in and around buildings, educating the public about disabilities, vocational training and opportunities, rehabilitation programs, hospital services, and health care insurance coverage.

In the words of the UN Secretary-General’s message, “On the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, let us remove physical and cultural barriers, build resilient societies, and create opportunities that truly leave no one behind.”

 

Monday Mystery – Terry’s Texas Rangers

We’re back with another Monday Mystery post. All of the images from this feature are available on the Texas Digital Archive (TDA), and we welcome folks to browse through all of the images available on this site. We’re looking to our community of patrons, which includes academic researchers, genealogists, photography historians, and Texas enthusiasts, to help us identify some of our photographic treasures.

This Monday Mystery is aided by the research of Dr. David Gracy II, former State Archivist here at the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. Dr. Gracy has helped staff identify and confirm the identities of many of the veterans in this image as a part of his research on George W. Littlefield. Archives staff are grateful for his perseverance and meticulous citations.

Terry’s Texas Rangers reunion panorama photograph, 1908.

Terry’s Texas Rangers reunion panorama. 1961/053-1, Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

View or download this photograph on the TDA at: tsl.access.preservica.com/uncategorized/digitalFile_479a53ee-f6d4-4ee2-804f-c3b721407cfc/

Question: Can you help further identify some of the veterans in this image? Review the list of men already identified, get more information about this panorama, and read a brief history of the Terry’s Texas Rangers at the online finding aid: http://www.lib.utexas.edu/taro/tslac/50140/tsl-50140.html.

And, as always, if you find an image on the TDA that you’d like to submit for a future Monday Mystery post please email archinfo@tsl.texas.gov and include “Monday Mystery” in the subject line.

Meet the Staff – Caroline Jones

Meet the Staff is a Q&A series on Out of the Stacks that highlights the Archives and Information Services staff of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

In 50 words or less, describe what you do.

I assist patrons in the Reference, Genealogy, and Archives Reading Rooms in conjunction with the Reference Librarians and Reference Archivists. This includes helping patrons with searching our catalog or using our microfilm readers, and other tasks like pulling and refiling materials and processing both US and Texas documents.

Why did you choose your profession?

When I was a sophomore in college, I went to a presentation my history professors were hosting concerning professions you could pursue with a BA in history. One speaker was an archivist (who I realized when I started at TSLAC was Jelain Chubb, the current State Archivist). Prior to her talk I didn’t know much about archives and wasn’t sure what I’d do after graduation, but the possibility of handling historic documents and making them accessible for research sounded like the perfect way to use my history degree in a hands on way. I loved the idea of being able to handle historical artifacts and not just read about them second hand. After volunteering in my high school’s archive back in Dallas and working in the St. Edward’s University Munday Library, I was determined to get into this field.

What is your favorite document, photo, or artifact in TSLAC’s collection? 

I don’t think I could ever choose just one! At the moment, one of my favorites is this photograph from the Graham (R. Niles) collection. I really enjoy this image because of the humor this woman has in posing with her dog. I enjoy finding these more candid images of people where they are clearly having a good time and not taking themselves too seriously. I also love animals, so I feel this woman is a kindred spirit.

1964/306-1675, Photographs, Graham (R. Niles) collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

When you’re not busy what do you like to do for fun?

I’m big into adult coloring books, Pilates and Barre classes, learning calligraphy, reading and writing, and binge watching shows on Netflix.