Women’s History Month, 2019: Women in the Texas Legislature

By Stephanie Andrews, Library Assistant

Display of titles on Texas women from the collections of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Every March, we as a country celebrate women and their role in our nation’s history with Women’s History Month. According to the United States Statutes, Public Law 100-9, the first celebrated Women’s History Month was in March 1987.

Visit the Law Library of Congress’ Women’s History Month webpage for more information about the federal government’s role in this yearly event. In addition to the annual proclamation, the National Women’s History Alliance suggests a theme for each year’s celebration. This year’s theme is, “Visionary Women: Champions of Peace & Nonviolence.”

As the Texas Legislature is currently in session, the Texas State Library and Archives Commission (TSLAC) would like to share some of our resources about women in the Texas Legislature. These women embody this year’s theme by the way they have brought about change in peaceful and nonviolent ways. Whether they were serving unfinished terms for their husbands, lobbying for a woman’s right to vote, or becoming the first of many to serve in the Texas Legislature, Texas women have had a vibrant and important role in the history of Texas politics.

A selection from the TSLAC collections highlighting the contributions of Texas women.

Some of the more notable women in Texas politics include: Edith Wilmans, the first woman to be elected to the Texas Legislature; Miriam “Ma” Ferguson, the first woman to be elected as Texas Governor; Barbara Jordan, the first African-American woman to be elected to the Texas Legislature; and, Irma Rangel, the first Mexican-American woman to be elected to the Texas Legislature. Read more about Texas’ female Legislators in Nancy Baker Jones’ book, Capitol Women: Texas Female Legislators, 1923-1999.

Below you will find a reading list of publications that cover people or topics related to Texas women in politics. The list is not intended to be comprehensive, but can be a starting place for learning more about Texas women legislators.  

“The majority of the American people still believe that every single individual in this country is entitled to just as much respect just as much dignity,
as every other individual.”     
Barbara Jordan, Texas State Senator 1967-1973

Publications and Electronic Materials

Title

Call Number

Format

Collection

A Texas Suffragist: Diaries and Writings of Jane Y. McCallum

322.44 M124H

Print

TSLAC-MAIN

Barbara Jordan: A Self-Portrait

923.2764 J761B

Print

TSLAC-MAIN

Black Texas Women

305.48 W725B

Print

TSLAC-MAIN

Black Texas Women: A Sourcebook

305.48 W725BS

Print

TSLAC-MAIN

Brave Black Women

305.48 W725

Print

TSLAC-MAIN

Celebrate the World

PE 1.12:W 84/2

Electronic File

U.S. Documents

Claytie and the Lady

976.4063 T578c

Print

TSLAC-MAIN

Democratizing Texas Politics

Z UA380.8 M348de

Print

Texas Documents

Finder’s Guide to the Texas Women: A Celebration of History Exhibit Archives

305.40976 F492

Print

TSLAC-MAIN

Joint Resolution to Designate the Month of March, 1987, as “Women’s History Month.”

AE 2.111:101/PT.1

Print

U.S. Documents

Latina Legislator: Leticia Van De Putte and the Road to Leadership

Z TA475.8 N228La

Print

Texas Documents

Oveta Culp Hobby: Colonel, Cabinet Member, Philanthropist

Z UA380.8 W725ov

Print

Texas Documents

Picturing Texas Politics

Z UA380.8 B151pi

Print

Texas Documents

Profiles in Power: Twentieth Century Texans in Washington

923.2764 P943 2004

Print

TSLAC-MAIN

Quotable Texas Women

305.4 Q57

Print

TSLAC-MAIN

Texas Senators 83rd Legislature

L1803.1 SE55 83

Print

Texas Documents

Texas Through Women’s Eyes

Z UA380.8 M118TE

Print

Texas Documents

Texas Women in Politics

329.009764 W413T

Print

TSLAC-MAIN

Texas Women: A Celebration of History

976.4042 T312

Print

TSLAC-MAIN

Texas Women: A Pictorial History

305.4 W725T

Print

TSLAC-MAIN

Texas Women: Interviews and Images

305.409764 L334T

Print

TSLAC-MAIN

Texas Women’s Hall of Fame

976.4092 M814t

Print

TSLAC-MAIN

Texas Women’s Hall of Fame: A Sesquicentennial Celebration

976.4092 SE64

Print

TSLAC-MAIN

Texas Women’s History Project Bibliography

305.4 T312B

Print

TSLAC-MAIN

The Capital Book

328.764092 C172

Print

TSLAC-MAIN

Tributes Delivered in Congress: Kay Bailey Hutchison

Y 1.1/3:113-8

Print

U.S. Documents

Women in Decision-Making

PE 1.12:W 84

Electronic File

U.S. Documents

Women in Texas

976.4042 C856W 1992

Print

ARC-REF

Archival Materials

Title

 

Collection

Records of Representative Anita Hill, 1979-1992

 

Archives

Representative Patricia Harless records, 2007-2015

 

Archives

Representative Debbie Riddle records, 2003-2015

 

Archives

Representative Molly White records, 2007-2016

 

Archives

Representative Myra Crownover records, 2003-2015

 

Archives

Representative Patricia Gray records, 1991-1993, 1995-2002, undated, bulk 1995-2001

 

Archives

Representative Harryette Ehrhardt records, 1991, 1994-2001, undated bulk 1995-2001

 

Archives

Records of Representative Ernestine Glossbrenner, 1977-1990 (bulk 1987-1990)

 

Archives

Records of Senator Cyndi Taylor Krier, 1974-1992 (bulk 1985-1992)

 

Archives

To search for these collections, books and more, check out our catalog at www.tsl.texas.gov/catalog. To learn more about our archives collections visit our Descriptive Guides webpage.

Contact the Reference Desk with any inquiries regarding these or other materials at TSLAC at ref@tsl.texas.gov, call us at 512-463-5455 or visit in person at 1201 Brazos Street, Austin, TX 78701 room 109.

Quotes above were referenced from Susie Kelly Flatau and Lou Halsell Rodenberger’s “Quotable Texas Women” (State House Press, 2005).

Texas State Library and Archives Commission Awards Research Fellowships

The Texas State Library and Archives Commission (TSLAC) is pleased to announce two recipients of the 2019 Research Fellowship in Texas History. The 2019 TSLAC Research fellows are Maggie Elmore for her project, “Claiming the Cross: How Latinos and the Catholic Church Reshaped America,” and Deborah Liles for “The Beefmasters: Confederate Contractors, Texas Cattlemen, and Civil War Trade.” First awarded in 2018, the fellowship supports scholars who require the use of State Archives collections and includes a $2,000 stipend.

TSLAC Research Fellow Maggie Elmore.

Maggie Elmore holds a doctorate from the University of California, Berkeley and is a postdoctoral research associate at the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism at the University of Notre Dame. Elmore studies the Latino experience with social and political exclusion in the 20th century United States.

Deborah Liles, who obtained her doctorate from the University of North Texas, serves as an assistant professor at Tarleton State University where she is the W.K. Gordon Chair of Texas History. Her current research focuses on the livestock trade and slave ownership during the Civil War.

State Archivist Jelain Chubb coordinates the fellowship in conjunction with the Texas State Historical Association (TSHA). “The number and quality of proposals we received this year was impressive,” said Chubb.  “These projects highlight the range of materials the State Archives offers scholars and I look forward to reading their publications,” she said.

Jelain Chubb poses with Deborah Liles at the TSHA awards luncheon.
State Archivist Jelain Chubb and TSLAC Research Fellow Deborah Liles. The 2019 TSLAC Research Fellowships were announced March 1 at the Texas State Historical Association annual meeting in Corpus Christi.

The TSLAC Research fellowship in Texas history is administered in partnership with TSHA and made possible by the Friends of Libraries and Archives of Texas through a generous donation from the Edouard Foundation. The awards were announced March 1 at the TSHA annual meeting held in Corpus Christi, Texas.


Artifacts Collection Highlights: Treaty Between Great Britain and the Republic of Texas for the Suppression of the African Slave Trade

By Rebecca Romanchuk, Archivist

Front cover of the Treaty between Great Britain and the Republic of Texas for the Suppression of the African Slave Trade, November 16, 1840. ATF0419, Artifacts collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

A few of the items in the Texas State Archives’ Artifacts collection are both artifact and document—a combination of physical object, often with aesthetic or artistic value, and informational record—that sheds light on a facet of our historical past. Among these are treaties between the Republic of Texas and other sovereign nations, created between 1839 and 1844 as formal and official documents of international diplomacy. These treaties are also described in our holdings as Texas Department of State treaties between the Republic of Texas and other nations.

The treaty pictured above, with its bright red velvet cover and decorative cord, is one of three treaties by which Great Britain recognized the Republic of Texas as an independent nation and was signed in November 1840. This particular treaty established an agreement between the two nations to suppress the African slave trade by declaring such trade as piracy. British or Texian merchant vessels discovered by either nations’ war ships to be carrying Africans for the purposes of enslavement were to be subject to capture and adjudication of their masters, crew, and accomplices. African men, women, and children found on board who were destined for slavery were to be immediately given their freedom and delivered to the nearest Texian or British territory. “Texian” was the adjective used during the Republic era where we would instead use “Texan” today.

First page of the Treaty between Great Britain and the Republic of Texas for the Suppression of the African Slave Trade, November 16, 1840. ATF0419, Artifacts collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

The treaty was signed in London, England, on November 16, 1840, by Lord Palmerston as Great Britain’s Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs and by James Hamilton, financial agent for the Republic of Texas. Hamilton had taken over the task of negotiation from James Pinckney Henderson, Texas minister to England at that time and the future first governor of the state of Texas.

Hamilton’s efforts resulted in three signed treaties between the nations, including this one to suppress the African slave trade, one of several such treaties Great Britain negotiated with other nations during this time. Great Britain had abolished slavery within its empire in 1807 and was working toward universal emancipation. The treaty was not approved by the Congress of the Republic of Texas until January 1842 due to politically motivated delay in sending the document to Texas. It became effective on June 28, 1842.

Though slavery existed and was lawful in Texas while it was a republic, and later as a state after annexation, prohibition of the African slave trade was part of the Constitution of the Republic of Texas, as it had also been prohibited by the United States Constitution since 1808. Even so, a small percentage of slaves in the republic arrived there due to illegal African trade.

Permanent residence of free blacks in the republic required the approval of Congress in each case. Before the Texas Revolution, the Mexican government had given free blacks full citizenship rights, but afterward, the Constitution of the Republic of Texas took away citizenship from those with one-eighth African blood and restricted their property rights. The “freedom” granted to those Africans who were found on vessels smuggling them into Texas was by no means full freedom as the white population enjoyed.

“All persons, Africans, the descendants of Africans, and Indians excepted, who were residing in Texas on the day of the declaration of Independence shall be considered citizens of the republic and entitled to all the privileges of such.” Detail from INV 6512, General Provisions, Section 10, Texas Constitution of 1836, Texas (Republic) Department of State records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission. Click here for an image of the entire page from Section 10.

The treaty was nullified by the subsequent annexation of Texas by the United States in 1845. A similar treaty between Great Britain and the United States was finally concluded in 1862, though negotiations had gone on between the two countries since 1814 (with the signing of the Treaty of Ghent) and had primarily been hindered by disagreement over conditions for search and visitation of vessels. Slavery in Texas officially ended after June 19, 1865, when federal forces occupied Galveston two months after the end of the American Civil War and emancipation was announced by the Union commander of the Department of Texas, General Gordon Granger. Still, the devastating effects of slavery persisted and continue to echo in our society’s struggles to ensure social justice and the protection of civil rights for African Americans.

Featured Collection: National Parks

By Maria Barker, Access Librarian

The new Featured Collection on National Parks is on display. If you are looking for a taste of the great outdoors or want to learn more about the history of the National Parks program and parks across the country, the current display is here to deliver. Our selection includes publications from the Texas document, US document, and Main collections.

My wild life : a memoir of adventures within America’s national parks, Wauer, Roland H., Texas Tech University Press, 2014. Call#: Z TT422.8 W356my

To search for these books and more, check out our catalog at www.tsl.texas.gov/catalog. If you are interested in checking out a title on our Featured Collection shelf, please visit the Reference Desk in room 109. Below is the complete list of titles you’ll find on our Featured Collection shelf this month.

Selections from the Texas State Library and Archives Collections:

599.097649 SCH56M
The mammals of Trans-Pecos Texas : including Big Bend National Park and Guadalupe Mountains National Park
Schmidly, David J.
MAIN
36237000391850

917.8 Y31
Your western national parks : a guide
Yeager, Dorr G. (Dorr Graves)
MAIN
36237003043920

T1300.8 C146RE
El Camino Real de los Tejas National Historic Trail
Texas Historical Commission.
TXD
36237003008436

Z TA475.8 C547en
Enjoying Big Bend National Park : a friendly guide to adventures for everyone
Clark, Gary
TXD
36237003482177

Z UA220.7 G941 NO.26
Guide to the Permian Reef Geology Trail : McKittrick Canyon, Guadalupe Mountains National Park, West Texas
Bebout, Don G.
TXD
36237001513809

Z TT422.8 W356my
My wild life : a memoir of adventures within America’s national parks
Wauer, Roland H.
TXD
36237003650864

I 29.2:M 56/5
Balcony House : a history of a cliff dwelling, Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado
Fiero, Kathleen
USD
36237504217981

I 29.86/4:AC 1/2
Cultural landscape report for the historic motor road system, Acadia National Park
Killion, Jeffrey
USD
36237505654596

I 29.2:F 94/2
Fruitful legacy : a historic context of orchards in the United States, with technical information for registering orchards in the National Register of Historic Places
Dolan, Susan
USD
36237506212212

I 29.2:M 97                                                              
Museum curatorship in the National Park Service, 1904-1982
Lewis, Ralph H.
USD
36237503346377

I 29.2:P 21/11
Parks for America : survey of park and related resources in 50 states, and preliminary plan.
United States Department of the Interior. National Park Service
USD
Pending cataloging

I 29.2:N 19/4                                                           
Presenting nature : the historic landscape design of the National Park Service : 1916 to 1942
McClelland, Linda Flint.
USD
36237503410249

I 29.2:T 64/3/2012
The most striking of objects : the totem poles of Sitka National Historical Park
Patrick, Andrew author.
USD
36237507278022

I 29.2:AR 7/5                                                           
Treasured landscapes : National Park Service art collections tell America’s stories
National Center for Cultural Resource Stewardship and Partnerships (U.S.). Museum Management Program, publisher.
USD
36237507968507

I 29.2:C 54/2
Where we found a whale : a history of Lake Clark National Park and Preserve
Fagan, Brian
USD
36237505971644

A Girl Named Loise: 19th Century Documents Record Hidden Lives

By Richard Gilreath, Reference Archivist

Historical records at the State Archives provide insight into the lives of enslaved African Americans residing in Texas in the 19th century. Various government documents available through the Texas State Library and Archives Commission (TSLAC) provide dates, names, and geographic locations important to family historians and other researchers hoping to identify individuals who may have lived in bondage. Deeds, wills, court cases and tax records are some of the evidentiary documents establishing intermittent timelines of those whose lives intersected with legal transactions, including those considered, under the law, as property. One such individual was a young African-American girl known as Loise. Loise makes several appearances in records dating from 1848 -1851. By using the names and locations mentioned in a single document as leads, we may follow Loise’s path for several years through the historical record.

We locate Loise on an 1849 Harris County tax-assessor’s deed which states that her owner, C. W. Bassett, owed the state back taxes. Loise was put up for auction. With no bidders, the State of Texas purchased her for $5.90.

This Harris County document reveals that C. W. Bassett owed back taxes for the year 1848. Tax Assessor and Collector, John N. Reed therefore levied “upon the following property of said C.W. Bassett to wit: One negro girl named Loise about ten years old slave for life.”
John N. Reed Deed, July 25, 1849, Miscellaneous File, Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

In our Texas Treasures online exhibit, we noted that Loise’s fate is unknown. However, by using other resources available at TSLAC, we can develop a better understanding of the life of Loise after this point. Loise’s own voice and words are not reflected in the records, but we are able to reconstruct an incomplete timeline of her life through the probate records of Harris County. These records, which have been microfilmed, are part of our county records on microfilm.

The probate record refers to Loise as “Louisa.” These similar but slightly different names add an additional layer of uncertainty. However, we believe – based on the locations and times in which these individuals lived – that Loise and Louisa are the same individual.

Loise is first referred to in the Harris County probate record on August 28, 1848 with the assigned value of $100.00 and as the legal property of Adam Erastus Cloud. Cloud, a minor, was represented by his guardian, James Walker. However, the probate record shows Loise under the possession of Harris County Sheriff, D. Russell, not Cloud. Walker sought to acquire physical possession of slaves that Cloud claimed.

On July 25, 1849, records reveal that the tax assessor and collector for Harris County, John N. Reed, put up for public auction in Harris County the young girl named Loise. She was described as “about ten years old” and “a slave for life.” As no one bid on her, the state purchased Loise for $5.90. Her purchase by the state is listed in a Comptroller’s Office register of tax sales. The finding aid for these records is available online. Although the finding aid references the sales of land, sales of slaves are also included in the volumes.

In an entry in the probate record dated June 27, 1850 – nearly a year after the auction – James Walker and Adam Cloud continued to claim Loise as Cloud’s property. The record noted that she was gifted to Cloud by his grandfather’s will. Several other slaves claimed by Cloud were found in Brazoria County, on property owned by F.J. Calvit. James Walker filed a lawsuit against Calvit to claim the slaves on Cloud’s behalf.

Texas Supreme Court document M-2980 – part one. James Walker filed a lawsuit against F.J. Calvit to claim slaves on behalf of Adam Cloud.
Texas Supreme Court document M-2980 – part two.

This court case ultimately went to the Texas Supreme Court. The case file went missing, but TSLAC recovered a portion of the file in 2008. The portion of the case file recovered does not mention Loise. (You can read more about TSLAC’s replevin efforts here.)

The probate record also reveals some of the circumstances of the death of Clement N. Bassett. A petition by August C. Daws, dated November 11, 1850, averred that Bassett died in 1848 (though it did not provide the exact date). This petition noted that litigation was ongoing between Adam Erastus Cloud and Bassett regarding the ownership of Loise. Daws applied to be the administrator of Bassett’s estate and swore that Bassett died without writing a will.

Bassett’s widow, Julia, protested Daws’s application on November 16, 1850. In response to her protest, Loise was mentioned by name, and appraised at $375.00 by the court. She was noted to be “about thirteen years of age.” On January 28, 1851, Daws submitted a motion to withdraw his application for administration of the Bassett estate. He cited a decision against him in a lawsuit, which also referenced Loise, as his reason for withdrawing the application. The other party in this lawsuit is not mentioned, but may have been Julia Bassett.

On July 31, 1851, Adam Erastus Cloud appears again in the probate record. He reached 21 years of age and asked to receive property held by James Walker as his guardian. In this entry in the record, Loise is assigned a value of $400.00. An entry in the probate record on October 2 of that year reveals that legal difficulties still surrounded Loise. She was excepted from the property returned to Cloud by Walker, due to “the prosecution of the suit in the District Court … in favor of said Cloud against Clement N. Bassett for a negro girl Louisa, commenced by said defendant as Guardian of said Cloud.” It appears, at this time, that Loise worked for a man named James W. Henderson, also in Harris County.

The probate court ordered Loise be returned to Cloud, but that she would remain in Henderson’s possession until the conclusion of the suit in District Court. The probate record noted that Loise was hired by Henderson, rather than owned by him.

After October 1851, we did not find further reference to Loise in the probate record. Her exact fate remains unknown, but the probate record allows us to reconstruct claims over her ownership and have a sense of what may have happened to her. After Bassett died, she was moved to the property of Henderson. It appears that several of Cloud’s slaves were sent to work on others’ property during this time period, and that Cloud took legal action to attempt to recover them.

Loise and the other slaves owned by Cloud were discussed as property, and the impact these decisions would have on their lives was never considered in the record. We do not have documentation of the hardships Loise experienced and survived during this time. However, these records provide us with the opportunity to understand a little more about the lives of slaves like Loise, who, to the best of our knowledge, left no written record of her own experiences.

Additional records at TSLAC and other institutions may provide more of the story. Harris County District Court records might provide the court case records of Adam Cloud’s and James Walker’s efforts to claim ownership of Loise. Her descendants may know the rest of the story. If you have additional information regarding Loise, please contact us at: ref@tsl.texas.gov.

Meet the Staff: Naomi Frantes

Meet the Staff is a Q&A series on Out of the Stacks that highlights the Archives and Information Services staff of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

A photograph of Cataloging and Metadata Librarian Naomi Frantes standing front of the pink granite wall of the Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building.
Cataloging and Metadata Librarian, Naomi Frantes

Describe your role at the Texas State Library and Archives Commission (TSLAC).

I have the distinct privilege of creating metadata so that the vast resources of Archives and Information Services are discoverable by researchers here in Texas and around the world.  My responsibilities include creating catalog records for our archival collections, photograph collections, Texas state publications and United States government publications.  These collections and documents pertain to a wide variety of subjects and can be found in our online catalog. I also create personal and corporate name authority records; the records help ensure that researchers can find all the books by the same author or publications and collections by the same government agency.

Why did you choose your profession?

After high school, I went to a small college in Minnesota and was assigned to the library for my work study program.  I loved the job! My intent in attending college was to major in biology or chemistry but there were only a few science courses available at the small college.  My science professor encouraged me to transfer to a larger university, so I transferred to the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks. Once again, I was assigned to work in the library. That position confirmed my desire to pursue a library career and I eventually graduated with a B.A. in history and German.  After taking a break from working to stay at home with my two children, I worked at the North Dakota State Library and obtained my Master’s Degree in Library Science.

What do you wish more people knew about TSLAC?

I wish more Texans knew about the vast array of services available from the Texas State Library and Archives Commission.  There is something here for everyone!  Besides the amazing historical resources we have in the ARIS Division, TSLAC also offers the Talking Book Program, which provides free library services to qualifying Texans with visual, physical, or reading disabilities. TSLAC also has the Center for the Book, which seeks to stimulate public interest in books, reading, literacy and libraries.  The Library Development and Networking Division provides online resources to the citizens and libraries of Texas and assists libraries and librarians in their efforts to serve their local constituents.

What do you like to do for fun?

I love to hike, explore Texas, visit national and state parks, play French horn, scrapbook, cross-stitch, bake, and hang out with my husband, Mike. I also love spending time with my two children whenever I can.

Thanks, Naomi!

Out of the Stacks and Into the Catalog: Secrets to Search Fields and Operators

By Kelli Dover, Library Assistant

If your library catalog searches for items in the Texas State Library and Archives Commission (TSLAC) collections give you too few or too many results, or you are not finding exactly what you want, this post will help you utilize Boolean operators and special characters to maximize your search efforts.

To perform any catalog search, you will need to open the TSLAC Library Catalog search home page. (If you’re not sure how to get there, see our previous post in this series.) This article will focus on the search buttons (circled in red below). Future posts will address the radio buttons (keyword, browse, exact) and library options on the drop-down menu. For the purposes of this post, we will select the radio button for “keyword” and choose “*TX State Library & Archives Comm” for the library.  You are now ready to search the catalog in keyword mode.

library catalog search screen

On the search home page, there are three radio buttons to choose from, a library drop-down box and six different buttons indicating search type.

After typing in your search terms, click on one of the blue buttons (Words or Phrase, Author, Title, Subject, Series, and Periodical Title) to run a specific search type. It is important to understand what kinds of results each search will yield.

Words or Phrase: Results include your search terms as found anywhere in the catalog record. If you type in your search terms and press enter, this is the default search type used. Below is an example of a catalog record and all of the fields that may include your search term.

Author: Results include your search terms that are found only within the author fields. This can include corporate authors and additional authors. You can use first name, last name, or initials. Including a last name will provide the best results.

Title: Search mechanism limits the options to only the title fields in the catalog record. Note: Periodical Title is a separate search.

Subject: Results will include your search terms as found in the subject index. If you are not looking for a specific item, this search will pull up a range of titles that may be related to your research area of interest. While it may not include every item in our collection on the subject, it will give you an idea of the types of publications in our collection. Clicking on a subject in the catalog record will bring you to a list of items that have the same subject.

Series: Results will include your search terms as found within the series field. Government documents and academic journals are often entered as series. A series covers publications released in intervals though not necessarily with regularity. It may be best to use a Title search or Words or Phrase search if you’re not finding what you want.

Periodical Title: Results will include your search terms as found within the periodical titles field. Periodicals are released at regular intervals and they generally have multiple contributors. It may be best to use Title search or Words or Phrase search if you’re not finding what you want.

Now that you’ve selected the appropriate search type, we will focus on terminology. Search operators and special commands determine how the words will be used to search the catalog. If you are unfamiliar with these terms, refer to the list below. We have described the basic Boolean operators and some special characters you can utilize in your search.

Basic Boolean Search Operators and Special Commands:

AND finds only records containing all of the search words entered.

         Example: Texas AND Architecture

OR finds records containing one or both of the search words entered. This search operator provides broader results than using AND.

         Example: Cooking OR Baking

NOT finds records containing search words but excludes anything following NOT.

         Example: Architecture NOT Texas.

XOR finds records containing only one of the two words entered, not both.

         Example: Film XOR Music

: finds records containing the exact phrase found inside the quotations.

         Example: “Landscape design”

$ works as a stem/truncation search. The search will find records that begin with the stem of the word and are truncated by the $.

        Example: searching gov$ will find records for government, governor, governing,  govern, etc.

$# : If you want to limit the number of letters following the truncation, add the number sign after the dollar sign.

         Examples: gov$3 finds records for govern. gov$5 finds records for govern and governor.

? : this symbol will work as a wildcard letter in searches.

         Example: searching gr?y, will find records for both grey and gray.

Refining your search technique with search types, operators, and special commands will help get you the results you want. Keep checking our blog for more posts on how to use and navigate the catalog.

State Archives Offering Research Workshops on Second Saturdays

Beginning in January, the Texas State Library and Archives Commission (TSLAC) will offer resource orientation workshops at 10 a.m. each Second Saturday of 2019. The workshops highlight key tools researchers may use at the State Archives or through the website, with each 20-minute session focusing on one essential resource. Reference staff will present on Texas city directories, county records, newspaper collections, vital statistics, U.S. Census records and Ancestry.com (Texas Collection).  The sequence repeats after the first cycle ends in June.

Researchers using Reference Library computers.

The free workshops should appeal to a wide range of patrons interested in library research. Those still familiarizing themselves with the assortment of access points one must navigate to discover source materials may find all of the topics germane, while the more practiced patrons may have specific collections in mind. Guests are invited to stay on and use TSLAC’s public service areas for their research activities until the library closes at 4 p.m. (Learn more about visiting the library here.) Here is the 2019 Second Saturday Workshop Series schedule:

Searching the Census Online                                              Jan. 12   |  July 13

Introduction to Newspaper Collections                                 March 9  |  Sept. 14          

Introduction to Texas County Records                                  April 13   |  Oct. 12

Ancestry.com Texas Collections                                           May 11   |  Nov. 9

Introduction to City Directories                                              June  8  |  Dec. 14

Registration is preferred but not required. Walk-ins are always welcome! For more information and to register visit https://www.tsl.texas.gov/arc/workshops.


Setting the Texas Table: “Dishing” on the Artifacts Collection at the Texas State Archives

By Rebecca Romanchuk, Archivist

[Texian Campaigne plates, 1840-1850. ATF0031b, Artifacts collection. Archives and Information Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.]

Some of us are enjoying the cooler weather we’ve been having in Austin lately and the way it makes us feel the holiday season has really arrived. For most, the holidays are made more festive and meaningful by the foods we prepare and share with others: traditional dishes at family dinners, potluck parties with friends and coworkers, cookie exchanges, and volunteering for or contributing to organizations that provide meals to those in need. Food truly connects us all.

At the Texas State Archives, we’re putting the spotlight on the history of Texas agriculture and foodstuffs in our lobby exhibit Setting the Texas Table, on view through May 2019. You’re cordially invited to visit in person to see this diverse and professionally curated exhibit of original archival materials and selections from our library collection, or take a virtual tour through the online version linked in the logo below. Be prepared to have your appetite whetted!

Of course, you can’t set a table without dishes and various other tableware items. The State Archives’ Artifacts collection includes a number of such pieces, many with connections to the family of Texas Governor Elisha Marshall Pease. These are easily searched for in the Texas Digital Archive; go to the Artifacts collection main search page and enter keywords in the “search within” box, or begin filtering using the options on the left sidebar. You can search for soup bowls, saucers, coffee cups and teacups, demitasse and sake cups, coffee pots and pitchers, plates and platters, and even a chafing dish (anyone hungry yet?). Or, note the artifact number (ATF0###) of an item that interests you in the finding aid and use that as your keyword to go directly to digital images and description of that item.

Many of the Pease table items are of two different Victorian-era designs: floral flow blue and what may be pink Sunderland lusterware (described as “orchid pink and white” in the Artifacts description). Both are varieties of transferware pottery made in England and commonly exported to the United States in the 19th century. The designs were produced by inking a copper plate onto which the design had been engraved, pressing paper onto the inked plate, then applying the still-wet inked paper onto the ceramic piece to transfer the design to it. This process was much less expensive than hand-painting. Imagine the dining table at the Governor’s Mansion or at Woodlawn, the Pease family mansion, laid out with a full set of either of these designs. Victorians adored vibrant color!

floral flow blue soup bowls

[Floral flow blue soup bowls, 1850-1900. ATF0232, Artifacts collection. Archives and Information Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.]

floral flow blue covered tureen dish

[Floral flow blue covered tureen dish, 1890-1900. ATF0227, Artifacts collection. Archives and Information Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.]

coffee pot with lid

[Coffee pot with lid (possibly Sunderland lusterware), 1850-1900. ATF0236, Artifacts collection. Archives and Information Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.]

Take a close look at the transfer pattern on the pink dessert dishes below. This is the Mother’s Grave design, featuring a boy and girl, with an accompanying small child, gazing mournfully at a gravestone in a picturesque churchyard setting. Mourning pieces such as these were commonly used by Victorian households to memorialize a departed family member. These dishes honor the daughter of Governor and First Lady Pease, Carrie Augusta Pease Graham, whose children came to live at Woodlawn to be raised by their grandmother and aunt, after their mother’s death in 1882. Descendants of those children donated the Pease tableware to the State Archives. They said Carrie Graham’s children hoped that all these dishes would be broken so they wouldn’t have to eat from them any longer. It’s easy to empathize with that wish, though we’re lucky to have these objects survive to provide a glimpse into the personal experiences of the Pease/Graham family and the traditions of the time.

dessert dishes

[Dessert dishes (possibly Sunderland lusterware), 1850-1900. ATF0241, Artifacts collection. Archives and Information Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.]

You can learn more about one of the Graham children, businessman and prominent Austin citizen R. Niles Graham, and his extended family from his collection of papers and photographs at the State Archives. Several dozen items once belonging to the Graham family are also part of our Artifacts collection.

Enjoy exploring all the charming tableware in the Artifacts collection and setting your own table to welcome others during the holidays.

 

Featured Collection: Textiles and Apparel

Information Services staff invite you to enjoy our updated Featured Collection display, on view through January 2019 at the Lorenzo de Zavala building, room 109.  To coincide with the colder winter months, the selection celebrates the textiles and apparel industry for producing the fabrics and garments which warm us.  Below is a summary of materials featured in the display.

Call No. Title Author Collection
391.04 R424 $10 horse, $40 saddle : cowboy clothing, arms, tools, and horse gear of the 1880’s Rickey, Don Main
Z TT422.8 P416fi A perfect fit : the garment industry and American Jewry (1860-1960) Goldstein, Gabriel M. TXD
Z TT422.8 AM65SE 2003 A separate sphere : dressmakers in Cincinnati’s golden age, 1877-1922 Amnéus, Cynthia TXD
Z TT422.8 H551AM American menswear : from the Civil War to the twenty-first century Hill, Daniel Delis TXD
Z TT422.8 H551AS As seen in Vogue : a century of American fashion in advertising Hill, Daniel Delis TXD
746.43 H839a AwareKnits : knit & crochet projects for the eco-conscious stitcher Howell, Vickie Main
Z TT422.8 C623 Clothing and textile collections in the United States : a CSA guide Queen, Sally TXD
I 29.2:C 62 Clothing for ladies and gentlemen of higher and lower standing : a working pamphlet to aid the imitators of New England citizens of the eighteenth century Hicks, Marjorie USD
SI 1.28:42 Cutting a fashionable fit : dressmakers’ drafting systems in the United States Kidwell, Claudia Brush USD
391 K811D Dress clothing of the Plains Indians Koch, Ronald P. Main
Z TT422.8 B431EM Embroiderers of Ninhue : stitching Chilean rural life Benavente, Carmen TXD
Z TT422.8 C150fo Forbidden fashions : invisible luxuries in early Venetian convents Campagnol, Isabella TXD
Z TT422.8 G195AR M. de Garsault’s 1767 Art of the shoemaker : an annotated translation Garsault, François A. de (François Alexandre) TXD
Z TT422.8 C654ma Managing costume collections : an essential primer Coffey-Webb, Louise TXD
D 101.11:10-3530-203-20 P Organizational maintenance repair parts and special tools lists : textile repair shop, trailer mounted (York Astro model D8700477, FSN 3530-819-2008; Army model SPV 35) (York Astro model D8700540, FSN 3530-900-8352) … clothing repair shop, trailer mounted (York Astro model D8700337, FSN 3530-819-2007, Army model SPV 34) United States. Department of the Army USD
SI 1.28:49 Technology in miniature : American textile patent models, 1819-1840 Janssen, Barbara Suit USD
745.5 M381 1946B The book of Indian-crafts and costumes Mason, Bernard Sterling Main
391.2 T768 The First Ladies in fashion Truett, Randle Bond Main
Z TT422.8 M421SU The sunbonnet : an American icon in Texas Matheson, Rebecca Jumper TXD
Z UA380.8 R79WE Weaving and dyeing in highland Ecuador Rowe, Ann P. TXD
Z TT422.8 M421yo Young Originals : Emily Wilkens and the teen sophisticate Matheson, Rebecca Jumper, TXD

Please see a librarian in room 109 if you are interested in checking out any of the circulating materials.