Texas Talking Book Program Author Talk: Taylor Moore

The Talking Book Program’s theme for our Summer Reading Program this year is Adventure begins at your Library, so join us for an author talk on Tuesday, July 16 at 7:00 p.m. (Central) with action-packed thriller author, Taylor Moore.

Reader’s Advisory Librarian, Laura Jean will talk with him about his career as an author as well as his books, from his GARRETT KOHL Series. A Q&A chat will follow.

Our Author Talks meet via Zoom, however all you need to participate is a telephone! If you have a land line, you will use the telephone number. If you have a smart phone, you will use the “one-tap” number to join the discussion. We will also email a Zoom invitation to those who prefer to use a computer. This information will be sent to all patrons who RSVP a week prior to the author talk.

We would also like to offer you the opportunity to ask Taylor Moore questions about his books. Please submit questions by July 9. We will choose questions based on the responses to this form and they may be asked during the event!

Question Submission Form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdnJUBaiGh0MUQEMUtqldrlqjQFj5vIXotqLsp1WqghSNwPLg/viewform?usp=sharing

To RSVP, please reply to this email, or call the Talking Book Program at 1-800-252-9605

Please indicate if you would like us to mail you a digital cartridge with his series or if you prefer to download them from BARD. Also, please let us know if you would like a reminder via email or phone-call (or both).

Start with the first book in his series: DOWN RANGE

DOWN RANGE (DBC 26465) by Taylor Moore

NLS Annotation: “As a decorated undercover DEA special agent, Garrett Kohl has traveled the world–and fought in most of it–but it’s the High Plains of northwest Texas he calls home and dreams of returning to one day. When he is ordered back to Texas on a short mission expected to take a week at most, Kohl is unsettled to discover that the once-peaceful ranching community he loves is under attack. A band of criminals who have infiltrated law enforcement, corrupted local businesses, and is now terrorizing Kohl’s own family.”– adapted from jacket. Commercial audiobook. Violence and strong language. 2021.

We look forward to having you join us on Tuesday, July 16!

Texas Talking Book Program Author Talk: Rubén Degollado

Join the Talking Book Program for an author talk on Tuesday, April 23 at 7:00 p.m. (Central) with award winning author Rubén Degollado.

Reader’s Advisory Librarian Laura Jean will talk with him about his career as an educator and author as well as his book, THE FAMILY IZQUIERDO: A NOVEL (DBC 28906).  A Q&A chat will follow.

Promo image of stage with red curtain and old fashioned chrome microphone with TBP and TSLAC logos and text mirroring post body with author name, date, etc.

Our Author Talks meet via Zoom; however, all you need to participate is a telephone! If you have a land line, you will use the telephone number. If you have a smart phone, you will use the “one-tap” number to join the discussion. We will also email a Zoom link invitation to those who prefer to use a computer. This information will be sent to all patrons who RSVP a week prior to the author talk.

We would also like to offer you the opportunity to ask Rubén Degollado questions about his book. Please submit questions by April 16. We will choose questions based on the responses to this form and they may be asked during the event!

Submit your questions at: https://forms.gle/Xagif6CpPgKgvuNj8

To RSVP, please reply to this email, or call the Talking Book Program at 1-800-252-9605

Please indicate if you would like us to mail you the digital cartridge or if you prefer to download it from BARD. Also, please let us know if you would like a reminder via email or phone-call (or both).

FAMILY IZQUIERDO: A NOVEL (DBC 28906) by Rubén Degollado

NLS Annotation: “A masterful debut that weaves together the lives of three generations of a Mexican American family bound by love, and a curse. The tight-knit Izquierdo family is grappling with misfortunes none of them can explain. Their beloved patriarch has suffered from an emotional collapse and is dying; eldest son Gonzalo’s marriage is falling apart; daughter Dina, beleaguered by the fear that her nightmares are real, is a shut-in. When Gonzalo digs up a strange object in the backyard of the family home, the Izquierdos take it as proof that a jealous neighbor has cursed them-could this be the reason for all their troubles? As the Izquierdos face a distressing present and an uncertain future, they are sustained by the blood that binds them, a divine presence, and an abiding love for one another. Told in a series of soulful voices brimming with warmth and humor, The Family Izquierdo is a tender narrative of a family at a turning point”– Provided by publisher. Commercial audiobook. Unrated. 2022.

We look forward to having you join us on Tuesday, April 23!

Texas Talking Book Program Author Talk: The Texanist, David Courtney

Join the Talking Book Program for an author talk on Thursday, February 22, at 7:00 p.m. (Central) with esteemed Texas journalist and author, David Courtney.

Reader’s Advisory Librarian, Laura Jean will talk with the Temple, Texas native about his career working as a columnist and editor for Texas Monthly as well as his book, The Texanist: Fine Advice on Living in Texas (DBC 18771). A Q&A chat will follow.

No registration is needed! Simply join the meeting on February 22 via one of the following methods.



Zoom Link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84839719639

One-Tap phone number (use with smartphones): http://+13462487799,,84839719639#

Dial In phone number (use with landlines and non-smartphones):

(346) 248-7799
Meeting ID: 848 3971 9639

Our Author Talks meet via Zoom, however all you need to participate is a telephone! If you have a land line, you will use the telephone number. If you have a smart phone, you will use the “one-tap” number to join the conversation.

If you’d like to read THE TEXANIST book, contact us to order it by replying to this email or calling us at 1-800-252-9605.

THE TEXANIST: FINE ADVICE ON LIVING IN TEXAS (DBC 18771) by David Courtney NLS Annotation: “The Texanist, Texas Monthly’s perennially popular back-page column, has become the magazine’s most-read feature. With an inimitable style and an unassailable wholesomeness, columnist David Courtney has counseled many a well-intentioned Texan, native or wannabe, on how to properly conduct him—or herself.” Publisher’s website. 2017.

We look forward to having you join us on Thursday, February 22!

Accessible StoryWalks for National StoryWalk® Week

November 12-18, 2023 is National StoryWalk® Week, sponsored by Let’s Move in Libraries and the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services! This is the third annual week-long event that, as noted in the Let’s Move in Libraries blog, celebrates “the inspiring work of libraries who spearhead StoryWalk® programs—promoting literacy, reading, health, exercise, and movement in communities and neighborhoods across the United States and the world.”

What even is a StoryWalk®? A StoryWalk® is a permanent installation incorporating a children’s story that has been deconstructed, with each page displayed separately along a path for participants to read and enjoy. It is a wonderful way to promote literacy and movement. Libraries are increasingly working to make these StoryWalks® more accessible to individuals of all abilities. Let’s Move in Libraries includes some tips for making StoryWalks® more accessible in their blog post about National StoryWalk® Week. Here are some things to consider when creating a StoryWalk®:

  • Use braille overlays on top of the book displays.
  • Incorporate an audio reading of the story into the StoryWalk®.
  • Provide audio or braille descriptions of the story’s pictures. Depending on the style of your StoryWalk®, you could even outline the pictures with puffy paint for a tactile design that can be felt!
  • Consider the location of your StoryWalk®. Places that are wheelchair accessible with a wide, paved walkway are preferable to uneven, narrow ground.

If you are in Austin, you can visit a braille enhanced StoryWalk® presented through a partnership between the Texas Talking Book Program and Austin Public Library (APL), located at APL’s Windsor Park Branch (833 Westminster Drive). Currently the APL Windsor Park StoryWalk® tells The Three Billy Goats Buenos story by Susan Middleton Elya. You can read more about this braille enhanced accessible StoryWalk® at the Talking Book Program’s June 6, 2023, press release about the launch of this partnership.

Learn more about accessible design and allyship with these books available through the Talking Book Program, and don’t forget to celebrate National StoryWalk® Week!

ACCESSIBLE AMERICA: A HISTORY OF DISABILITY AND DESIGN by Bess Williamson (DB 94027; BR 22552)

WHAT CAN A BODY DO?: HOW WE MEET THE BUILT WORLD by Sara Hendren (DB 100228; BR 23245)

DEMYSTIFYING DISABILITY: WHAT TO KNOW, WHAT TO SAY, AND HOW TO BE AN ALLY by Emily Ladau (DB 105481; BR 23987)

National Book Award Nominees 2023

The National Book Awards were established in 1950 to celebrate the best writing in America. Since 1989, they have been overseen by the National Book Foundation, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to celebrate the best literature in America, expand its audience, and ensure that books have a prominent place in American culture. Although other categories have been recognized in the past, the Awards currently honor the best Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, Translated Literature, and Young People’s Literature published each year.

For more information on the National Book Awards: https://www.nationalbook.org/

The longlist of nominees were announced on September 13-15, the finalists were chosen on October 3, and the winners will be selected on November 15, 2023.

The nominees for this year’s National Book Awards in the TBP Collection:

Fiction

THIS OTHER EDEN by Paul Harding (DB 113243, BR 24845 IN PROCESS)
LOOT by Tania James (DB 115153 IN PROCESS)
CHAIN-GANG ALL STARS by Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah (DB 114336)

Nonfiction

REDISCOVERY OF AMERICA: NATIVE PEOPLES AND THE UNMAKING OF U.S. HISTORY by Ned Blackhawk (DB 115217 IN PROCESS)
KING: A LIFE by Jonathan Eig (DB 115189)
LILIANA’S INVINCIBLE SUMMER: A SISTER’S SEARCH FOR JUSTICE by Cristina Rivera Garza (DB 115091)
ORDINARY NOTES by Christina Elizabeth Sharpe (DB 114934 IN PROCESS)
FIRE WEATHER: A TRUE STORY FROM A HOTTER WORLD by John Valliant (IN PROCESS)
I SAW DEATH COMING: A HISTORY OF TERROR AND SURVIVAL IN THE WAR AGAINST RECONSTRUCTION by Kidada E. Williams (DB 114200 IN PROCESS)

Translated Literature

THIS IS NOT MIAMI by Fernanda Melchor
Translated from the Spanish by Sophie Hughes (IN PROCESS)
ABYSS by Pilar Quintana
Translated from the Spanish by Lisa Dillman (DB 115593 IN PROCESS)

Poetry

HOW TO COMMUNICATE: POEMS by John Lee Clark (DB 113879 IN PROCESS, BR 24891 IN PROCESS)
PROMISES OF GOLD / PROMESAS DE ORO by José Olivarez (DB 114551 IN PROCESS)

Young People’s Literature

SIMON SORT OF SAYS by Erin Bow (DB 113782)
FORGET ME NOT by Alyson Derrick (DB 115486 IN PROCESS)

Disability Book Week

Disability Book Week occurs every year during the week of April 23 – 29.

This is a worldwide celebration of books that feature a main character with a disability.

You can participate in Disability Book Week by reading a book that includes a disabled character or theme, and then posting a review on a social media site or talking with friends. You can also ask school or public libraries to host a Disability Book Week event, or request that your city issue a Disability Book Week proclamation.

Visit https://disabilitybookweek.org to learn more.

The site has a list of recommended books for children, young people, and adults.

September 6: National Read a Book Day

The Talking Book Program (TBP) always advocates reading. Our motto is: That All May Read. National Read a Book Day, celebrated on September 6 of every year, is a day that invites everyone to read. So TBP and National Read a Book Day just naturally go together. There are so many ways to celebrate:

  1. Read a book!
  2. Share your passion for books and reading with someone.
  3.  Read a book from a new or different genre.
  4. Read a favorite book from childhood or a book that is a friend or family member’s favorite.
  5. Share the stories you are reading using #ReadABookDay to post on social media.

ProTip: Don’t have time to read entire book? Try reading a magazine issue, a book of poetry, or a story from an essay or short story collection.

Facts from the Texas Talking Book Program

  • Texas has over 17,000 TBP patrons.
  • In 2021, TBP circulated 688,186 braille, large print, and audio cartridges via mail to our patrons.
  • Texas patrons downloaded 302,789 books via the Braille and Audio Reading Download (BARD) in 2021.
  • We added 345 large print and 125 braille titles to our physical collection in 2021.
  • In 2021, 292 books were recorded and uploaded to BARD from our Texas recording studio.

There are many more books to choose from for National Reading Day!

Books about Books, Librarians, and Bookstores

  • Do you like cozy mysteries? Try the Booktown Mystery Series by Lorna Barrett or the Mystery Bookshop Mystery Series by V. M. Burns
  • Is romance more your style? Try the Librarians in Love Series by Sarah Title or BOOKISH LIFE OF NINA HILL (DB 95745, LB 12621)
  • Does Science Fiction make you want to snuggle up with a good book? Try the Borrowed Man Series by Gene Wolfe
  • Or do you want the facts, and nothing but the facts? Here are some nonfiction books about books you may enjoy. Try SHELF LIFE: ROMANCE, MYSTERY, DRAMA, AND OTHER PAGE-TURNING ADVENTURES FROM A YEAR IN A BOOKSTORE (DB 60048) by Suzanne Strempek Shea or if you prefer more of a true crime twist, try LIBRARY BOOK (DB 92869, LB 11432) BY Susan Orleans.

Not sure what you want to read? Contact the Talking Book Program at 1-800-252-9605 (if in Austin, call our local number at 512-463-5458) and one of our readers consultants or readers’ advisory librarians can help you choose your next favorite book.


 

April is National Poetry Month!

April is National Poetry Month. “Launched by the Academy of American Poets in April 1996, National Poetry Month reminds the public that poets have an integral role to play in our culture and that poetry matters. Over the years, it has become the largest literary celebration in the world, with tens of millions of readers, students, K–12 teachers, librarians, booksellers, literary events curators, publishers, families, and—of course—poets, marking poetry’s important place in our lives.”- From https://poets.org/national-poetry-month  

Poets.org offers “Poem-a-Day”: 

Sign up here and they will email you a poem each day in April. 

Or you can subscribe to their “Poem-a-Day” Podcast:  

https://cms.megaphone.fm/channel/poem-a-day?selected=POETS4875982945#:~:text=

We have curated a small taste of the poetry we have in our collection below. These titles are available to download from BARD, or you can call us to have them mailed to you. You can also request other poetry! 

Poetry for kids and teens: 

APPLE: SKIN TO THE CORE: A MEMOIR IN WORDS AND PICTURES by Eric Gansworth (DB 101947) 

Memoir-in-verse by award-winning author and artist, Eric Gansworth. Gansworth, a member of the Onondaga Nation, tells his story of growing up at the Tuscarora Nation. He covers his family’s history and struggles, the impact of boarding schools, racism, and poverty. Strong language. Commercial audiobook. For senior high and older readers. 2020. 

BARK IN THE PARK!: POEMS FOR DOG LOVERS by Avery Corman (DB 95455) 

Poems about different kinds of dogs and their unique traits as they romp about in a park. For grades K-3. 2019. 

BEAUTIFUL DAY IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD: THE POETRY OF MISTER ROGERS by Fred Rogers (DB 96626) 

Lyrics to seventy-five songs from the children’s television program Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, collected and presented as a treasury of poems. Lyrics explore topics such as feelings, new siblings, everyday life, and imagination. Commercial audiobook. For preschool-grade 2 and older readers. 2019. 

EEK, YOU REEK!: POEMS ABOUT ANIMALS THAT STINK, STANK, STUNK by Jane Yolen (DB 98262) 

Collection of poems about the different critters in nature that make a funky impact in their environment. For grades 2-4. 2019. 

EXQUISITE: THE POETRY AND LIFE OF GWENDOLYN BROOKS by Suzanne Slade

(DB 102344) 

A free verse biography of poet Gwendolyn Brooks, the first Black person to win the Pulitzer Prize. From a young age, Brooks found inspiration from her family, in nature and her Chicago neighborhood, and began writing poetry at the age of seven. Includes her poem “Clouds.” For grades K-3. 2020. 

HILL WE CLIMB: AN INAUGURAL POEM FOR THE COUNTRY by Amanda Gorman

(DB 102763) 

National Youth Poet Laureate delivers an empowering and hopeful poem for the nation. Originally read on January, 20, 2021, at the inauguration of the 46th president of the United States, Joe Biden. Foreword by Oprah Winfrey. Commercial audiobook. For senior high and older readers. 2021. 

NO MORE POEMS!: A BOOK IN VERSE THAT JUST GETS WORSE by Rhett Miller

(DB 94332) 

Humorous poems about such subjects as disco bath parties, sneaky sisters, nose hairs, and wanting a dog. Commercial audiobook. For grades K-3. 2019. 

NO VOICE TOO SMALL: FOURTEEN YOUNG AMERICANS MAKING HISTORY by Various Authors (DB 103950) 

Joseph Bruchac, Nikki Grimes, Janet Wong, and others present poems about young activists who have stepped up to make changes in their community and in the United States. For grades 2-4. 2020. 

PLACE INSIDE OF ME: A POEM TO HEAL THE HEART by Zetta Elliot (DB 103759) 

A young Black boy skateboards and ponders his deep emotions, from joy to sorrow and anger to compassion, but above all, love. For grades K-3. 2020. 

SHOUT: A POETRY MEMOIR by Laurie Halse Anderson (DB 94454) 

A memoir in verse shares the author’s life, covering her difficult early childhood, her rape at thirteen, and her experiences surrounding the publication of her 1999 novel Speak (DB 49958). Strong language, some violence, and some descriptions of sex. Commercial audiobook. For senior high and older readers. 2019 

SUPERLATIVE BIRDS by Leslie Bulion (DB 94751) 

Poems in a variety of verse forms with accompanying science notes introduce readers to eighteen unusual birds. For grades 2-4. 2019. 

THEY CALL ME BUERO: A BORDER KID’S POEMS by David Bowles (DB 106023) 

A novel in verse. Güero and his misfit crew—los Bobbys—discover girls and occasionally get into trouble by the Mexican border. Güero copes with life’s challenges by writing poetry, after encouragement from his teacher. Commercial audiobook. For grades 5-8. 2018. 

WOKE: A YOUNG POET’S CALL TO JUSTICE by Various Authors (DB 99980) 

A collection of poems by women that reflects the joy and passion in the fight for social justice. Topics include ableism, body positivity, empathy, equality, justice, privilege, resistance, and more. For grades 3-6. 2020. 

Poetry for adults: 

BEST AMERICAN POETRY, 2019 by Various Authors (DB 96983) 

Seventy-five previously published poems. Includes works by Margaret Atwood, Ocean Vuong, Naomi Shihab Nye, and former United States poet laureates Natasha Trethewey, Juan Felipe Herrera, and Tracy K. Smith. Violence and strong language. 2019 

BLACK FROM THE FUTURE: A COLLECTION OF BLACK SPECULATIVE WRITING by Various Authors (DB 97405) 

A collection of stories by Black women writers from across the spectrum of Black speculative writing, including science fiction, fantasy, magical realism, and Afrofuturism. Includes stories from, among others, Jewelle Gomez, Eden Royce, Nicole Sconiers, Morgan Christie, Vernita Hall, Stefani Cox, and Leila Green. 2019. 

CALL US WHAT WE CARRY: POEMS by Amanda Gorman (DB 106426) 

A collection of more than seventy poems written by National Youth Poet Laureate and New York Times bestselling author Amanda Gorman. Reflects on the past, present, and future, exploring history, language, identity, grief, and hope. Includes The Hill We Climb, which was read during the inauguration of the 46th President of the United States, Joe Biden, in 2021. Unrated. Commercial audiobook. Bestseller. 2021. 

CRYING BOOK by Heather Christle (DB 98483) 

A poet wrestles with the concepts and impacts of death, mental illness, grief, joy, impending motherhood, and the role of crying in female agency. Some strong language. 2019. 

FELON: POEMS by Reginald Dwayne Betts (DB 97471) 

Collection of poems examining the ways prison viscerally effects a person’s sense of identity. Each poem follows a single man through his experiences, which include homelessness, underemployment, love, drug abuse, domestic violence, and fatherhood, and his emotional reactions to them. Strong language. Commercial audiobook. 2019. 

HERMOSA by Yesika Salgado (DB 97983) 

Collection of 55 poems exploring relationships, romance, sex, grief, survival, life in Los Angeles, fighting for a better future, and everyday moments. Some strong language and some explicit descriptions of sex. 2019. 

HOMIE: POEMS by Danez Smith (DB 99206) 

Collection of thirty-six poems exploring the meaning and importance of friendship. Examines the impact of violence, xenophobia, and disparity on those defined by race, queerness, and diagnosis. Reflects on the loss of one the author’s closest friends. Some strong language. Commercial audiobook. 2020. 

MAGICAL NEGRO: POEMS by Morgan Parker (DB 95008) 

Collection of forty poems exploring the everyday black experience in America. Themes include loneliness, displacement, grief, ancestral trauma, and objectification. Also examines tropes and stereotypes of black Americans. Strong language and explicit descriptions of sex. Commercial audiobook. 2019. 

MAKE ME RAIN: POEMS & PROSE by Nikki Giovanni (DB 102243) 

Collection of seventy-four poetry and prose works by the author of Chasing Utopia (DB 77840) and Racism 101 (DB 38687) explore themes of living in America while Black. In “Lemonade Grows from Soil, Too” she reflects on poetry in black culture. Violence and some strong language. Commercial audiobook. 2020. 

NOUNS & VERBS: NEW AND SELECTED POEMS by Campbell McGrath (DB 9644) 

Collection of more than one hundred poems—some previously published–that explore American spiritual and material hungers. “Reading Emily Dickinson at Jiffy Lube” is a musing on the work and impact of Emily Dickinson and the author himself, geography, Smirnoff Ice, and Bruce Springsteen. Strong language. Commercial audiobook. 2019. 

OCTOPUS MUSEUM: POEMS by Brenda Shaughnessy (DB 97204) 

Collection of twenty-nine poems by the author of Our Andromeda (DB 75566) structured around the concept of visiting exhibits in a museum. Themes explored include environmental destruction, racism, sexism, and divisive politics. 2019. 

TRADITION by Jericho Brown (DB 96974) 

Collection of fifty-two poems exploring the nature and lasting impact of injuries, both personal and on a national level. In the title poem, the author reflects on generational promises given, but which are undercut by state violence. Violence. Pulitzer Prize for poetry, 2020. 2019. 

TRUTH ABOUT MAGIC by Atticus (Poet) (DB 97002) 

Collection of poems, by the author of The Dark between Stars (DB 92580), that explore heartbreaks, falling in love, looking back, and looking inwards. Examines the emotions that romantic relationships engender and the journey of investigating ourselves that they allow. Some strong language. Commercial audiobook. 2019. 

March 25: Tolkien Reading Day

Most of us know about J. R. R. Tolkien from his book THE HOBBIT and his LORD OF THE RINGS Trilogy, but he wrote more than 30 thirty books! Aside from writing fantasy-fiction, he also was a poet, translator, medievalist, and professor.

In 2003, the Tolkien Society chose March 25 as Tolkien Reading Day to encourage the reading of J.R.R. Tolkien’s work, as well as to inspire readers to learn more about the author himself. The day matches the fall of Sauron in Tolkien’s THE LORD OF THE RINGS.

Celebrate it by reading one of the books by or about Tolkien in our collection:

Fiction

History of Middle Earth Series

BOOK OF LOST TALES: PART I (DB 20827)

Stories the author wrote sixty to seventy years ago are now provided with commentary by his son Christopher. In these tales the traveler Eriol comes to the Lonely Island, Tol Eressea, and is offered hospitality by its elven folk. From them he learns of the gods called Valar, how the world was created, and the early history of the Eldar themselves. 1984.

BOOK OF LOST TALES: PART 2, THE HISTORY OF MIDDLE-EARTH (DB 48494)

Versions of six legends and myths invented by Tolkien as background for his early writing and reworked for later publications. His son has edited the manuscripts and added commentary. Sequel to “THE BOOK OF LOST TALES, PART 1.” 1986.

Stand Alone Tales of Middle Earth

BEREN AND LUTHIEN (DB 88461)

The love story of Beren, a human man, and Luthien, an elf maiden. Set during the First Age of Middle-earth, Luthien’s father’s consent to the couple’s marriage is contingent on Beren surviving a dangerous quest to retrieve the Silmaril jewel. This story was restored from Tolkien’s manuscripts by his son. 2017.

FALL OF GONDOLIN (DB 92472, BR 22395, LB 11427)

Tuor is sent to Gondolin by the god Ulmo, only to fall in love with the elf king’s daughter, Idril. Their bliss is shattered when the evil Morgoth sends an army to destroy Gondolin. This previously unpublished Middle-earth tale was edited by the author’s son Christopher. Bestseller. 2018.

SILMARILLION (DB 60367, BR 11510)

Collection of imaginative tales and legends, and an account of the Elder Days, of the First Age of the World. Morgoth, the first Dark Lord, dwells in Middle-earth, and the High Elves make war upon him for the recovery of the Silmarils. Bestseller, 1977.

TALE OF THE CHILDREN OF HURIN: NARN I CHN HURIN (DB 64650, BR 17216)

A tale of the Elder Days of Middle-earth, variations of which appeared in UNFINISHED TALES (DB 65877, BR 17613) and THE SILMARILLION (DB 60367, BR 11510). Describes the fates of Hurin–cursed lord of Dorlomin — and his children Turin and Ninor. Restored, edited, and introduced by the author’s son, Christopher Tolkien. Bestseller. 2007. en español: DB 62999

UNFINISHED TALES: OF NUMENOR AND MIDDLE-EARTH (DB 65877, BR 17615)

Collection of tales and essays, published after the author’s death, that further explore the environment and inhabitants of Tolkien’s special world. It provides a rare glimpse of how he developed his fantasy world over the years. Bestseller. 1980.

Juvenile Fiction

Lord of the Rings Series

HOBBIT: OR, THERE AND BACK AGAIN (DB 48978, BR 11595, LB 04884)

The wandering wizard Gandalf recruits Bilbo Baggins, a Hobbit, to be the fourteenth member of an expedition. Hobbits prefer comfort to adventures, but Bilbo joins the quest and encounters many perils including a dragon. For Grades six through nine and older readers. en español: DB 60980; en français: DBG 09502; на русском: DBF 03791

FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING: BEING THE FIRST PART OF THE LORD OF THE RINGS (DB 47486, BR 09745, LB 04282)

In this first volume of The Lord of the Rings, Frodo, a home-loving hobbit, inherits the magic ring that his Uncle Bilbo brought back from his adventures in THE HOBBIT (RC 11497). To protect the ring from the powers of darkness, Frodo must make a long, dangerous journey. Prequel to THE TWO TOWERS (DB 47487). For Grades six through nine and older readers. en español: DB 61051

TWO TOWERS: BEING THE SECOND PART OF THE LORD OF THE RINGS (DB 47487, BR 09747, LB 04273)

In this second volume of the Lord of the Rings, the now-separated companions of the Ring meet Saruman the wizard, cross the Dead Marshes, and prepare for the Great War in which the power of the Ring will be undone. Sequel to the Fellowship of the Ring. For Grades six through nine and older readers. en español: DB 61042

RETURN OF THE KING: BEING THE THIRD PART OF THE LORD OF THE RINGS (DB 47488, BR 09749, LB 04274)

In this third volume of the Ring trilogy, Frodo and Sam bear the Ring to Mount Doom. The War of the Ring, fought between the forces for good and the Dark Lord of evil, is ended. Sequel to THE TWO TOWERS. For Grades six through nine and older readers.

en español: DB 62979

Stand Alone Novel

ROVERANDOM (DB 47216, BR 11808)

A young and foolish dog is turned into a toy after biting a sorcerer. As a plaything, Roverandom is owned by a little boy named Two. After many adventures, Roverandom manages to be turned back into a real dog. Grades six through nine. 1998.

Nonfiction by Tolkien

LEGEND OF SIGURD AND GUDRUN (DB 71835, BR 18640)

A retelling in English narrative verse of the epic Norse tales about Sigurd the Volsung and the fate of Gudrun’s family, the Niflungs. First publication, with an introduction and commentary by Christopher Tolkien, his father’s literary executor. 2009.

LETTERS FROM FATHER CHRISTMAS (DB 63808)

A collection of Christmas letters penned by J.R.R. Tolkien and signed as Father Christmas that were sent to Tolkien’s children from 1920-1943. Each recapped activities of the preceding year at the North Pole, including reindeer running amok and the North Polar Bear breaking the moon into four pieces. 2004.

LETTERS OF J.R.R. TOLKIEN (DB 17875)

Collection of letters in which the famous author of LORD OF THE RINGS writes about his personal and professional life to family, friends, colleagues, and fans. The letters, arranged chronologically, cover the period of Tolkein’s life from 1914 to 1973.

SIR GAWAIN AND THE GREEN KNIGHT, PEARL, AND SIR ORFEO (DB 56740, BR 15685)

Three medieval poems from the age of Arthurian legend, translated into modern English by the author of THE HOBBIT (RC 48978, BR 11595) and the Lord of the Rings trilogy. 1975.

Nonfiction About Tolkien

FELLOWSHIP: THE LITERARY LIVES OF THE INKLINGS; J.R.R. TOLKIEN, C.S. LEWIS, OWEN BARFIELD, AND CHARLES WILLIAMS by Philip Zaleski (DB 82527)

For three decades, C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and their closest associates (namely, Owen Barfield and Charles Williams) formed the Inklings, a weekly literary club. An accounting of the Inklings’ lives and work is provided, along with the ideas, affections, and vexations that drove the group’s members. 2015.

INKLINGS: C.S. LEWIS, J.R.R. TOLKIEN, CHARLES WILLIAMS, AND THEIR FRIENDS by Humphrey Carpenter (DB 105865)

The author discusses the group of friends called the Inklings, which was founded during the 1930s at Oxford and included renowned authors C. S. Lewis and J. R. R. Tolkien. The author, who also attended Oxford at the time, reconstructs the group’s meetings and friendships. Unrated. Commercial audiobook. 1978.

INVENTING THE MIDDLE AGES: THE LIVES, WORKS, AND IDEAS OF THE GREAT MEDIEVALISTS OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY by Norman F. Cantor (DB 36850)

The medievalist, professor, and author analyzes twentieth-century notions of what the Middle Ages were like and profiles the lives and works of the men who formed modern ideas of that period. Among those represented are C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, Ernst Kantorowicz, Marc Bloch, David Knowles, Joseph Strayer, Frederic Maitland, and Erwin Panofsky.

TOLKIEN: A BIOGRAPHY by Humphrey Carpenter (DB 52637)

Traces Tolkien’s life from early childhood in South Africa through the lonely period that followed the deaths of both parents and ended with his marriage. Relates his years as a distinguished Oxford professor and his acclaim as the author of the Hobbit series.

Juvenile Nonfiction

MYTH MAKER: J.R.R. TOLKIEN by Anne E. Neimark (DB 47919)

A brief biography of the creator of THE HOBBIT (DB 11497, BR 11595). Presents in narrative form Tolkien’s early childhood in South Africa, his move to England, becoming an orphan, and the importance of religion and education in his development. Discusses his marriage, his career as a professor, and the mythological world he created. For grades five through eight and older readers.


Youth Media Award Winners 2022

Presented by the American Library Association on January 24, 2022 

“Recognized worldwide for the high quality they represent, ALA awards guide parents, educators, librarians and others in selecting the best materials for youth. Selected by judging committees of librarians and other children’s experts, the awards encourage original and creative work. For more information on the ALA youth media awards and notables, please visit ala.org/yma” -From the American Library Association 

Titles with a * next to them won multiple awards this year. 


John Newbery Medal for the most outstanding contribution to children’s literature:  

*THE LAST CUENTISTA by Donna Barba Higuera  

DB 105729     BR 23967 in process 

Petra Peña’s world is ending, and only the chosen few will journey to a new planet. Hundreds of years later, Petra wakes to discover that she alone remembers Earth. A sinister Collective has taken over the ship during its journey, bent on erasing the sins of humanity’s past.  

Randolph Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished American picture book for children:  

*WATERCRESS illustrated by Jason Chin; written by Andrea Wang 

(Not yet available from NLS- nominated for print Braille production) 

Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award recognizing an African American author and illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults: 

*UNSPEAKABLE: THE TULSA RACE MASSACRE by Carole Boston Weatherford, illustrated by Floyd Cooper 

DB 103676     BR 23732 in process 

An award-winning author recounts the 1921 Tulsa, Oklahoma, race massacre—one of the worst incidents of racial violence in our nation’s history. 

Coretta Scott King (Illustrator) Book Award  

*UNSPEAKABLE: THE TULSA RACE MASSACRE illustrated by Floyd Cooper; written by Carole Boston Weatherford 

DB 103676     BR 23732 in process 

An award-winning author recounts the 1921 Tulsa, Oklahoma, race massacre—one of the worst incidents of racial violence in our nation’s history. 

Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent (Author) Award 

ME (MOTH) by Amber McBride 

DB 105871 in process 

Moth, who lost her family in an accident, and Sani, who is battling ongoing depression, take a road trip that has them chasing ghosts and searching for ancestors, which helps them move forward in surprising and unforgettable ways. Unrated. Commercial audiobook. 

Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent (Illustrator) Award 

THE ME I CHOOSE TO BE illustrated by Regis and Kahran Bethencourt; written by Natasha Anastasia Tarpley 

(Not yet available from NLS) 

Coretta Scott King – Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement:  

Nikki Grimes is the winner of the Coretta Scott King – Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement. The award pays tribute to the quality and magnitude of beloved children’s author Virginia Hamilton. Grimes has been widely recognized for her distinguished contribution to children’s and young adult literature, winning numerous major awards. After more than 77 books, she has sealed her legacy by weaving poetry and novels in verse into an impressive body of work. Grimes currently resides in Corona, California, where she continues her powerful writing. 

Contact us to reserve her books. 

Michael L. Printz Award for excellence in literature written for young adults: 

*FIRE KEEPER’S DAUGHTER by Angeline Boulley 

DB 102762 

Daunis, who is part Ojibwe, defers attending the University of Michigan to care for her mother. When Daunis witnesses a shocking murder, she reluctantly agrees to go undercover, drawing on her knowledge of chemistry and Ojibwe traditional medicine to track down the source of a new drug. Unrated. Commercial audiobook 

Schneider Family Book Awards for books that embody an artistic expression of the disability experience:  

Young Children ages 0 to 8:  

MY CITY SPEAKS by Darren Lebeuf, illustrated by Ashley Barron  

(Not yet in NLS-nominated for print Braille production) 

Middle Grades ages 9 to 13:  

A BIRD WILL SOAR by Alison Green 

(TITLE IN PRODUCTION. NOT AVAILABLE YET- BR and DB) 

Teens ages 14-18:  

WORDS IN MY HANDS written and illustrated by Asphyxia 

(TITLE IN PRODUCTION. NOT AVAILABLE YET- BR and DB) 

Alex Awards for the 10 best adult books that appeal to teen audiences:  

LIGHT FROM UNCOMMON STARS by Ryka Aoki 

DB 105930 in process 

Shizuka has made a deal with the devil to deliver the souls of violin prodigies, and when she meets a talented young transgender runaway, she knows she’s found her final candidate. But when Shizuka meets retired starship captain Lan Tran, her plans are soon derailed. Unrated. Commercial audiobook. 

ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF LENNI AND MARGOT by Marianne Cronin  

DB 103815 

Seventeen-year-old Lenni Pettersson lives on the Terminal Ward at the Glasgow Princess Royal Hospital. Though told she’s dying, Lenni still has plenty of living to do. Joining the hospital’s arts and crafts class, she meets the magnificent Margot, an 83-year-old rebel, who transforms Lenni in ways she never imagined. Unrated. Commercial audiobook. 

WITCH’S HEART by Genevieve Gornichec 

DB 102781 

A punishment from Odin leaves witch Angrboda injured and powerless. She flees into a remote forest and meets a man who reveals himself to be the trickster god Loki. They fall in love and have three children, but Angrboda has visions that her family will be present at Ragnarok. Unrated. Commercial audiobook. 

LIBRARY OF THE DEAD by T.L Huchu 

DB 103872 

A dropout, Ropa carries messages for ghosts to make a living on the streets of Edinburgh. When the dead begin to whisper about missing and bewitched children, Ropa investigates. Meanwhile, she discovers an occult library, gains a magical mentor, and uncovers dark secrets. Unrated. Commercial audiobook 

HOW LUCKY by Will Leitch  

(Not yet in NLS) 

WINTER’S ORBIT by Everina Maxwell 

DB 102298 

Jainan, the widower of the Imperial Prince is rushed into an arranged marriage with his dead husband’s cousin to avert war. When Jainan is suspected of the Prince’s murder, he must solve the mystery, prevent interplanetary war, and deal with his growing feelings for his new husband. Unrated. Commercial audiobook. 

ROSE CODE by Kate Quinn  

DB 102559 

1940. As England prepares to fight the Nazis, three very different women answer the call to mysterious country estate Bletchley Park, where the best minds in Britain train to break German military codes. Debutante Osla, self-made Mab, and local spinster Beth become friends, until rumors circulate of a traitor at Bletchley. Unrated. Commercial audiobook. 

CROSSING THE LINE: A FEARLESS TEAM OF BROTHERS AND THE SPORT THAT CHANGED THEIR LIVES FOREVER by Kareem Rosser  

DB 102745 

In this memoir, the author describes growing up in a West Philadelphia neighborhood devastated by poverty and violence. He and his brothers stumble upon a stable run by Lezlie Hiner, who offers to teach them to ride, leading the author to become part of the first all-Black national interscholastic polo championship team. Unrated. Commercial audiobook 

LORE OLUMPUS, VOL. 1by Rachel Smythe  

(Not yet in NLS) 

MALICE by Heather Walter 

(Not yet in NLS) 

Children’s Literature Legacy Award honors an author or illustrator whose books, published in the United States, have made, over a period of years, a substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children through books that demonstrate integrity and respect for all children’s lives and experiences.  

The 2022 winner is Grace Lin. Since the publication of her first book, “The Ugly Vegetables,” in 1999, Lin has written and/or illustrated more than 40 books for children. 

Contact us to reserve her books. 

Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in writing for young adults:  

The 2022 winner is A.S. King whose books include: “SW/TCH,” “Still Life with Tornado,” “Ask the Passengers,” “Glory O’Brien’s History of the Future” and “Please Ignore Vera Dietz,” among other titles. 

Contact us to reserve their books. 

Mildred L. Batchelder Award for an outstanding children’s book originally published in a language other than English in a country other than the United States, and subsequently translated into English for publication in the United States:  

TEMPLE ALLEY SUMMER; originally published in Japanese as Kimyōji Yokochō no Natsu by Sachiko Kashiwaba, illustrated by Miho Satake, translated by Avery Fischer Udagawa  

(Not yet in NLS) 

Odyssey Award for the best audiobooks produced for children and young adults, available in English in the United States:  

Children:  

BOOGIE BOOGIE, Y’ALL; written and narrated by C. G. Esperanza  

(Not yet in NLS) 

Young Adults:  

WHEN YOU LOOK LIKE US by Pamela N. Harris and narrated by Preston Butler III 

DB 103824 

After his sister Nicole disappears, Jay and a friend from church try to piece together what happened to his sister, because he knows the Newport News police department won’t help search for a missing Black girl from public housing. Unrated. Commercial audiobook. 

Pura Belpré Awards honoring Latinx writers and illustrators whose children’s and young adult books best portray, affirm, and celebrate the Latino cultural experience:  

Youth Illustration Award winner: 

¡VAMOS! LET’S CROSS THE BRIDGE illustrated and written by Raúl Gonzalez 

DB 101952 

After lunch requests come in, Little Lobo, a Mexican American, and Bernabé, his dog, gather tacos, frutas picadas, cuernos, and more. They must deliver them to los luchadores at el Coliseo. Commercial audiobook. 

Children’s Author Award winner: 

*LAST CUENTISTA by Donna Barba Higuera  

DB 105729     BR 23967 in process 

Petra Peña’s world is ending, and only the chosen few will journey to a new planet. Hundreds of years later, Petra wakes to discover that she alone remembers Earth. A sinister Collective has taken over the ship during its journey, bent on erasing the sins of humanity’s past. 

Young Adult Author Award winner: 

HOW MOON FUENTEZ FELL IN LOVE WITH THE UNIVERSE by Raquel Vasquez Gilliland 

(Not yet in NLS) 

Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Award for most distinguished informational book for children:  

THE PEOPLE’S PAINTER: HOW BEN SHAHN FOUGHT FOR JUSTICE WITH ART by Cynthia Levinson and illustrated by Evan Turk 

(Not yet in NLS) 

Stonewall Book Award – Mike Morgan & Larry Romans Children’s & Young Adult Literature Award given annually to English-language children’s and young adult books of exceptional merit relating to the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender experience: 

Children’s Award:  

TOO BRIGHT TO SEE by Kyle Lukoff  

DB 105462 

In the summer before middle school, eleven-year-old Bug must contend with best friend Moira suddenly caring about clothes, makeup, and boys; a ghostly haunting; and the truth about Bug’s gender identity. Commercial audiobook. 

Young Adult’s Award:  

*LAST NIGHT AT THE TELEGRAPH CLUB by Malinda Lo  

DB 104015 

1954. McCarthyism and the Red Scare are genuine threats to Lily’s family; her father is already at risk of deportation despite his valid citizenship. Lily, who is Chinese American, could lose everything just for dating anyone white—let alone another girl—but she could lose herself if she isn’t true to her feelings. Includes supplemental material. Unrated. Commercial audiobook. 

Theodor Seuss Geisel Award for the most distinguished beginning reader book:  

FOX AT NIGHT written and illustrated by Corey R. Tabor  

(Not yet in NLS) 

William C. Morris Award for a debut book published by a first-time author writing for teens:  

*FIREKEEPER’S DAUGHTER by Angeline Boulley  

DB 102762 

Daunis, who is part Ojibwe, defers attending the University of Michigan to care for her mother. When Daunis witnesses a shocking murder, she reluctantly agrees to go undercover, drawing on her knowledge of chemistry and Ojibwe traditional medicine to track down the source of a new drug. Unrated. Commercial audiobook 

YALSA (Young Adult Library Services Association) Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults

AMBUSHED!: THE ASSASSINATION PLOT AGAINST PRESIDENT GARFIELD by Gail Jarrow 

(Not yet in NLS) 

American Indian Youth Literature Awards are announced in even years and were established to identify and honor the very best writing and illustrations by and about American Indians and Alaska Natives. Selected titles present American Indians in the fullness of their humanity in the present and past contexts. This year’s winners include:  

Picture Book:  

HERIZON by Daniel W. Vandever [Diné] 

(Not yet in NLS) 

Middle Grade Book:  

HEALER OF THE WATER MONSTER by Brian Young [Diné] 

DB 104419 

When Nathan visits his grandma, Nali, at her mobile summer home on the Navajo reservation, he knows he’s in for a pretty uneventful summer. But things change after he meets a water monster that needs his help. Commercial audiobook. 

Young Adult Book:  

APPLE (SKIN TO THE CORE) by Eric Gansworth [Onondaga] 

DB 101947    BR 23594 in process 

Memoir-in-verse by award-winning author and artist, Eric Gansworth, a member of the Onondaga Nation, tells his story of growing up at the Tuscarora Nation. He covers his family’s history and struggles, the impact of boarding schools, racism, and poverty. Strong language. Commercial audiobook. 

Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature The award promotes Asian/Pacific American culture and heritage and is awarded based on literary and artistic merit. The award offers three youth categories including Picture Book, Children’s Literature and Youth Literature. The award is administered by the Asian Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA), an affiliate of the American Library Association. This year’s winners include:  

Picture Book:  

*WATERCRESS written by Andrea Wang, illustrated by Jason Chin 

(not yet in NLS- nominated for print Braille production) 

Children’s Literature:  

AMINA’S SONG by Hena Khan 

DB 103070 

Feeling pulled between two cultures after a month with family in Pakistan, Amina shares her experiences with her Wisconsin classmates through a class assignment and a songwriting project with new student Nico. Sequel to Amina’s Voice (DB 87659). Commercial audiobook. 

Youth Literature:  

*LAST NIGHT AT THE TELEGRAPH CLUB by Malinda Lo  

DB 104015 

1954. McCarthyism and the Red Scare are genuine threats to Lily’s family; her father is already at risk of deportation despite his valid citizenship. Lily, who is Chinese American, could lose everything just for dating anyone white—let alone another girl—but she could lose herself if she isn’t true to her feelings. Includes supplemental material. Unrated. Commercial audiobook. 

The Sydney Taylor Book Award is presented annually to outstanding books for children and teens that authentically portray the Jewish experience. Presented by the Association of Jewish Libraries since 1968, the award encourages the publication and widespread use of quality Judaic literature. This year’s Gold Medalists include:  

Picture Book:  

PASSOVER GUEST written by Susan Kusel, illustrated by Sean Rubin  

(Not yet in NLS) 

Middle Grades:  

HOW TO FIND WHAT YOU’RE NOT LOOKING FOR by Veera Hiranandani 

DB 105195 

Eleven-year-old Ariel Goldberg must find her own voice and define her own beliefs after her big sister elopes with a young man from India, following the Supreme Court decision that strikes down laws banning interracial marriage. Commercial audiobook  

Young Adult:  

CITY BEAUTIFUL by Aden Polydoros 

(Not yet in NLS) 

The Sydney Taylor Body-of-Work Award recognizes an author or entity who has made a substantial contribution over time to the genre of Jewish children’s literature.  

This year’s winner is Jane Yolen

Contact us to reserve her books.