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The Future of Rural Texas Symposium – Host a Watch Party!

2018 September 19

Future of Rural TexasA message from Mark Smith, Director and Librarian of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission:

On November 12 and 13, the Texas Tribune and the Texas Rural Funders Collaborative will present a symposium called “The Future of Rural” at Texas A&M University. The symposium will feature community leaders, elected officials and stakeholders addressing several important issues including education, healthcare, natural resources and economic development. The goal is to convene stakeholders to examine and bring attention to rural issues. The event will be livestreamed to multiple locations across the state.

The Texas State Library and Archives Commission and the Tocker Foundation are partnering to encourage libraries to participate in this exciting free online event. Specifically, we are asking that you save the date and consider hosting a livestream watch party for your community. If you are interested in hosting a livestream watch party in your community, please sign up to receive a toolkit to guide you through the process. You can choose to participate in all or part of this event. We are also encouraging libraries to use the symposium as an opportunity to stimulate discussions of matters that resonate to their communities.

Educate Texas, a partner organization for the event, provides more information on how to get involved:

What is a watch party?

  • A watch party is a social gathering in which attendants view an event remotely. The symposium will be livestreamed and archived, so your group can watch panel discussions and participate in the conversation in your town at any time convenient for your group.

Why should my organization host a watch party?

  • The purpose of the symposium is to bring attention to rural value and needs. Through the watch parties we hope to start a statewide conversation. We encourage organizations to engage with their communities on the issues especially relevant to their region.

Are there resources to help me plan this event?

  • Yes. The Texas Tribune has created a viewing guide to help plan your event. You will also will have the flexibility to plan a watch party that meets your communities’ needs. For example:
    • Only stream panels relevant to your community.
    • Your watch party can be open to the public or a private event.
    • Schedule your event to occur after the symposium if livestreaming is a concern.
    • The number of attendants can vary depending on your space and community.
    • Create your own community discussion questions based on the panel topics.

Sign Up to Host a Watch Party

We hope you can join us for this exciting event. ​If your organization plans to host a watch party, please complete this form​ and the Tribune will provide a watch party viewing guide by October 9th when the symposium registration opens.

About the Texas Rural Funders Collaborative

In July 2017 a group of funders came together to consider how we might collaborate to bring additional attention and resources to rural Texas. The Texas Rural Funders Collaborative (TRFC) is made up of private foundations, community foundations, and health-conversation foundations. All-together the participating funders represent a variety of interests. We support the work that many rural practitioners dedicate themselves to every single day. It is our hope that by working together and with other people representing a diversity of expertise that we have the opportunity to take a cross-sectoral approach to honor, preserve and strengthen rural life in Texas. Our belief is that the health of our state depends upon the success of ALL our communities and that urban and rural areas are inexplicably linked. Throughout, it has been a priority for us to approach this work from an asset, rather than deficit, perspective; we are eager to share what is working in rural communities as what is not.

About the Texas Tribune

The mission of The Texas Tribune is grounded in the belief that giving Texans plentiful access to nonpartisan news and information about statewide issues is crucial to encouraging civic participation and a healthy, vibrant Texas. Every day, the Tribune produces ambitious public-service journalism on matters of statewide concern — to provide Texans with the tools and information they need to become civically engaged and better informed about a host of issues, including education, income inequality, health and human services and more.

 

Frank Dobie Library Trust Awards: Application Deadline December 15, 2018

2018 September 18

We are passing on the following information from the J. Frank Dobie Library Trust Awards Committee. If you have questions, please contact Gretchen McCord at gretchen@digitalinfolaw.com. Thank you!

The J. Frank Dobie Library Trust Awards Committee is accepting applications for 2019 awards through December 15, 2018.

When famed Texas author and folklorist J. Frank Dobie passed away in 1964, he left the majority of his estate to create the J. Frank Dobie Library Trust for the purpose of assisting small Texas libraries in purchasing books. Awards are selected annually by a committee and presented at the opening luncheon of the Texas Library Association annual conference (attendance is not required).

Award Criteria

Mr. Dobie’s will specifies that the degree of support a library receives from its community be taken into consideration by the selection committee. Therefore, awards are made on the basis of not only need, but also the extent to which community governments, library boards, friend’s organizations, and individuals have promoted and supported the library, in comparison with their potential to do so. The selection committee also takes into consideration the library’s support of the community and the library’s need of additional book resources.

Eligibility
Application is open to public libraries in Texas who (1) serve a population of 20,000 or less (per the library’s annual TSLAC report); (2) are legally established; and (3) are open for service at 1 least twenty hours per week.

*A legally established public library is one established as a department of a city or county government by charter, resolution, or ordinance: or by contract as provided for in the Interlocal Cooperation Act, Texas Civil Statutes, Article 4413 (32c): or as a nonprofit corporation chartered by the Office of the Secretary of State for the purposes of providing free public services, and having a current contract with a city, county, or school district to provide free public library services for the city, county, or school district.

Number and Amount of Awards
The total amount available for awards each year is determined by the net income of the trust. The selection committee determines each year both the number and the amount of awards. In 2018, a total of $46,000 was distributed to five libraries.

Expenditure of Awards
Awarded funds must be used solely for the purchase of books in any format, including ebooks and audiobooks. The committee intends that the funds be spent within one calendar year of receipt.

Deadline and Timeline

APPLICATIONS MUST BE RECEIVED NO LATER THAN DECEMBER 15, 2018.

The committee expects to notify all applicants of its decisions by the end of February 2019.

Awards will be presented at the Opening Luncheon of the Texas Library Association annual conference on Tuesday, April 16, 2019. We love for recipients to attend so that they can be publicly recognized by their peers, but we understand that many cannot. In those cases, checks will be mailed following the conference.

Application Process: DECEMBER 15, 2018, DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATION

The selection committee will pull the most recent TSLAC annual report of each applicant library and consider information from the report that it deems relevant, including information about collections, services and programs, funding, and revenue and expenditures.

To apply, submit the information described below by email to: Gretchen McCord, gretchen@digitalinfolaw.com

Note: If you do not receive confirmation that your application was received within three business days of sending, please contact Gretchen at the email above or 512.470.8932.

Information to be Included in Application 

  • Cover sheet containing:
    • Name of Library
    • Contact person
    • City and county
    • Mailing address
    • Email address(es)
    • Telephone number
  • Brief history of the library
  • Brief description of the library’s service area and communities served
  • Description of support the library receives from the community
    • Provide an account of local efforts in support of the library over the most recent one or more years. Statistics provide some evidence of continuing local support of the library, but limited insight into the persistency and intensity of effort that went into their making. Tell how local government, businesses, and citizen groups have contributed to the betterment of the library. Tell of efforts the library staff, board, and friends have made toward the promotion and improvement of library services. Tell your story!
  • Explanation of how the library meets the needs of different segments of the community
    • For example: programming, bookmobile service, services to nursing homes or day care centers
  • Description of any engagement in library cooperation, such as cooperation between the public and school libraries
  • Description of how the library uses volunteers ( i.e. , what your volunteers do)
  • If your library has received one or more Dobie awards in the past, briefly describe how the library and the community benefited from the award.
  • The kinds of books the library proposes to buy and the reasons for such purchases. There are no restrictions on the kinds of books that may be bought; however, regardless of type, books purchased should be of good quality and lasting value.
  • The name and qualifications of the library staff member who would be responsible for book selection and/or the name and qualifications of a consultant outside the library who would be willing to advise the library in its book purchases.

Tips for Your Application

Do not send any statistics other than those specifically requested above; the committee will obtain all other statistics of interest from your library’s TSLAC annual report.

If any of the above information is not included in your application packet, the committee may choose to not consider your library for an an award.

Please take the Small Library Management Training Program (SLM) Survey!

2018 September 17

Small Library Management Training ProgramIt is hard to believe, but the Small Library Management Training Program (SLM) program has been around for nearly a quarter of a century! In order to ensure the program is keeping up with the continuously evolving Texas library landscape, we at the Texas State Library have decided it is time to update the program. There will be several planning stages of this update, and we want to include you! The first step in this process is a survey intended to understand how the SLM program is working and how it can be improved upon.

Please participate by clicking on the survey link here:

https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/4567719/SLM-survey

The survey will close at 4 p.m. Central time on Oct. 1. It will be followed by virtual focus groups to be scheduled in the fall. You will have a chance to indicate your interest in the survey form.

Your feedback will be driving this process. We need your help to design a program that supports the 21st century needs of small libraries in Texas. If you have any additional questions or feedback, please email Kyla Hunt at khunt@tsl.texas.gov. Thank you!!

Free CE and Training This Week – September 17-21

2018 September 16
by Christina Manz

The weekly listing is sourced from Wyoming State Library Training Calendar with free training online, and free Texas workshops, updated as new events are added. See what’s happening on the CE calendar. Confirm the date and time when you register, or follow links for archive information. Events listed in Central Time. 

Monday, Sep 17
Fall Mystery Releases Unveiled (Library Journal)
Mystery lovers, wait no more! Join Library Journal for this free one-hour webcast, and get a sneak preview of the latest titles in this pulse-pounding genre. You’ll hear from HarperCollins, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and Severn House, all sure to tease terrific new books to match up with your mystery fans. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.libraryjournal.com/?subpage=Events
Time: 2-3pm

Tuesday, Sep 18
Is Your Workforce Ready for the Future? (Training Industry)
Organizations are changing from hierarchical structures to flat systems of team members collaborating on projects. Digitalization is also changing the paradigm. Modern organizations require individuals to have new job roles, new responsibilities and, thus, new skill sets to perform successfully now and deliver in the future. For more information and to register, visit: https://trainingindustry.com/webinar/
Time: 10-11am

Tuesday, Sep 18
Playing by the Rules: Creating an Effective Volunteer Handbook (VolunteerMatch)
Learn how to create a living document that can help both paid and volunteer staff be better informed and know what is expected of them. A good Volunteer Handbook can also help you better identify and deal with challenging volunteers. Whether you’re just starting to create a Handbook or if you’re looking for best practices on information to include, this webinar will evaluate the Handbook you have and help you create a stronger framework for your volunteer engagement program. For more information and to register, visit: http://learn.volunteermatch.org/training-topics
Time: 10-11am

Tuesday, Sep 18
Leadership through Convincing & Influencing Part 2 (Utah State Library)
This exciting 2-part webinar is designed to provide realistic strategies that can be immediately used in any encounter in which you want others to agree with you or support your decisions. It will strengthen your confidence and ability to lead, to cultivate win-win solutions to problems, to negotiate effectively when necessary, and to implement change with less resistance from staff and colleagues. For more information and to register, visit: https://heritage.utah.gov/library/workshops
Time: 11-12pm

Tuesday, Sep 18
Supporting Healthy Racial Identity Development for All Children (Association for Library Service to Children)
While most white educators would never describe themselves as being prejudiced, studies show that unconscious (implicit) bias is alive and well in educational settings. How can white educators, including librarians in school and public libraries, learn to not only notice their bias, but also act in ways that will promote and support racial equity? Join us for this important, and sometimes uncomfortable, conversation on how to address white racial bias and discrimination to create healthy, equitable learning environments. For more information and to register, visit: http://www.ala.org/alsc/elearning/live-webinars
Time: 11-12pm

Tuesday, Sep 18
Pave the Way for a Successful #GivingTuesday (Firespring)
Join Dana Ostomel, founder of Deposit a Gift and Firespring’s leading authority on crowdfunding, to learn the 10 most important components to creating an empathetic, engaged and responsive community that is ready to help you knock it out of the park. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.firespring.org/education/webinars.html
Time: 12-1pm

Tuesday, Sep 18
How to Write Compelling Fundraising Letters (Blackbaud)
Many schools still send fundraising letters to parents and alumni via snail mail but have no way to know whether the letters are effective. In this webinar, you’ll learn how to write fundraising letters that will compel parents and alumni to take action and donate to your school. This webinar should also be relevant to libraries. For more information and to register, visit: https://hello.blackbaud.com/2018-K12-Fundraising-Series.html
Time: 12-1pm

Tuesday, Sep 18
Happily-Ever-After Guaranteed (Booklist)
Keep your romance fans and all readers seeking satisfying love stories happy with forthcoming titles presented by Macmillan Adult, HarperCollins, and Baker Publishing. Romance Writers of America will also join host Donna Seaman, Editor, Adult Books, Booklist. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.booklistonline.com/webinars
Time: 1-2pm

Tuesday, Sep 18
Negotiate with Confidence (Texas State Library & Archives Commission)
Does the idea of negotiating contracts sound intimidating? Are you uncomfortable with the thought that you have the knowledge and power to negotiate for what you want? You negotiate daily in situations you may not even realize are negotiations, at stores, restaurants and with your family and friends. Learn how to use the skills you have and use them in your business. Learn to negotiate with confidence. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.tsl.texas.gov/ld/workshops/webinars/index.html
Time: 2-3pm

Tuesday, Sep 18
Revitalizing Library Volunteer Engagement (WebJunction)
Library volunteerism is evolving. Gone are the days of looking for tasks to keep your volunteers busy. Libraries are now enlisting high impact volunteers who are bringing unique skills and expertise to enhance the library’s mission. Join us to learn how you can harness the power of skilled volunteers in your community and hear success stories of innovative volunteer engagement in libraries of all sizes and budgets. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.webjunction.org/events/webjunction.html
Time: 2-3pm

Wednesday, Sep 18
Tools for Giving Season: Leveraging Facebook for Your Nonprofit (GuideStar)
Join us to get tips and tricks from experts at Facebook, GuideStar, and the ASPCA. Learn how to apply Facebook’s fundraising tools and best practices to #GivingTuesday, and how to sustain your fundraising momentum throughout the year. For more information and to register, visit: https://learn.guidestar.org/news/webinars
Time: 1-2pm

Wednesday, Sep 18
Behind the Scenes: Ensuring Flawless Virtual Events (InSync Training)
The virtual classroom now represents a common and critical component of modern learning. Corporate training now uses these web-based platforms as frequently as the face-to-face environment. What goes into making sure virtual events work time after time? Find out in this one hour webinar. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.insynctraining.com/complimentary-programs/
Time: 1-2pm

Tuesday, Sep 18
Supercharge Your Collection with New Fall Nonfiction (School Library Journal) What’s missing from your collection? New and engaging nonfiction! From learning about forest babies to exploring STEAM career opportunities — and everything in between — these fun and informational series and titles are sure to inspire your curious young readers. Join publishing insiders for an array of nonficiton to deck out your shelves this fall! For more information and to register, visit: https://www.slj.com/?subpage=Events
Time: 2-3pm

Tuesday, Sep 18
Transform Your Lesson Plans with TeachersFirst and SAMR (TeachersFirst)
Learn to infuse tech into your lessons by using the SAMR Model along with resources on the TeachersFirst website to create rich digital learning experiences. Learn how to transform your lesson plans by applying the SAMR Model in conjunction with resources available on the TeachersFirst website. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.teachersfirst.com/ok2ask/
Time: 6-7pm

Wednesday, Sep 19
Accessible Library Customer Service (National Network of Libraries of Medicine) Gain knowledge and tools to provide accessible customer service in your library by joining us for this one-hour webinar! This presentation will give an overview of disability including appropriate terminology, creating an accessible environment, and evaluating current practices for way-finding, emergency preparedness, and web resources. For more information and to register, visit: https://nnlm.gov/training
Time: 12-1pm

Wednesday, Sep 19
Nutrition 101: Eat And Drink Your Way Through Government Resources on Good Nutrition (Federal Depository Library Program)
This webinar will cover sites such as myplate.gov, nutrition.gov, and other websites which provide help and advice for healthy eating. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.fdlp.gov/about-the-fdlp/fdlp-events-calendar
Time: 2-3pm

Thursday, Sep 20
Look Before You Leap: What You Need to Know Before You Write That Grant (TechSoup)
Jumping into grant writing without an understanding of the process and obligations can be a costly mistake for many nonprofit organizations. During this webinar, Alice Ruhnke, Founder and Owner of The Grant Advantage, will discuss common misconceptions in the grant seeking process, requirements most funders expect nonprofit organizations will fulfill, and how to move from simply being eligible to apply to creating strong, competitive applications. During the 90-minutes, participants will not only gain knowledge, but also receive resources to help them in their grant seeking journey. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.techsoup.org/community/events-webinars/default
Time: 1-2pm

Thursday, Sep 20
Getting Unstuck: The Secret Life of Procrastinators (Colorado State Library)
Do you believe you work best under pressure? Do you avoid tasks and deliberately look for distractions? Are you late for appointments? Have a hard time completing projects?  If you struggle with any of these you may be a procrastinator. Join this session to explore why we procrastinate and how we can stop. For more information and to register, visit: https://cslinsession.cvlsites.org/
Time: 1-2pm

Thursday, Sep 20
The Power of Blogging & Thought Leadership for Nonprofits (Firespring)
Most nonprofits that have tried to blog have failed miserably. In this session, we will share the collective wisdom we’ve gleaned from dozens of nonprofit organizations that have stumbled upon the magic formula for becoming thought leaders in their community. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.firespring.org/education/webinars.html
Time: 1:30-2:30pm

Thursday, Sep 20
Ditching Dewey – How to Adopt Bookstore Style Organization (Texas State Library & Archives Commission)
The Keller Public Library stopped using the Dewey Decimal System in favor of bookstore style organization in January 2017. Library Services Manager Rae Cheney will tell you why they got rid of Dewey, give step-by-step instructions for making the change at your library, and share the results after making the switch (spoiler alert: it’s been great!). She will also cover ways to blend bookstore style organization with Dewey if you aren’t quite ready to call it quits. This information is applicable to all library types and there will be plenty of time for questions and answers to help you figure out how to make subject classification work for your institution. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.tsl.texas.gov/ld/workshops/webinars/index.html
Time: 1:30-3pm

Texas Public Libraries Updated Statistics and Tools Available!

2018 September 11
by Valicia Greenwood

Does the idea of making a set of slides with graphs and charts keep you awake at night? Especially if those presentations hold the key to keeping your library running efficiently?

We have some tools that will help!

Direct your browser to the Texas Public Library Statistics page, https://www.tsl.texas.gov/ld/pubs/pls/index.html.  We have compiled information from the Texas Public Libraries Annual Reports, from reporting years 1996 through 2017.

Library Comparison

Library Comparison

You can compare your library to up to four others using the Individual Library Statistics and Comparison Charts.

Summaries and totals for all the libraries in the state can be found in the Texas Public Library Statewide Statistics.  The format has been revised and condensed this year.

Using the Five-Year Trend Charts, trends for a variety of measures since 2012 can be viewed and used by selecting the library’s city and then simply downloading an Excel chart for the subject you wish to present.

There are graphics for operating expenditures, operating revenue, library use, collection information, and library program trends.

One library was able to demonstrate that, with a relatively flat budget for the last five years, programs and program attendance increased. They could persuasively argue that, with the addition of a few more dollars, even greater gains in library use could be made.

Programs and Program Attendance

Programs and Program Attendance

Use this information to display your local statistics or see how you measure up statewide.  To view the national picture, take a look at the information available through IMLS to view national data (https://www.imls.gov/research-evaluation/data-collection/public-libraries-survey).  Statistics from 2016 were released this summer.

If you need any assistance or additional information, contact Library Statistics Specialist Valicia Greenwood (vgreenwood@tsl.texas.gov) or LSTA/Accreditation Program Coordinator Stacey Malek (smalek@tsl.texas.gov).  You can also call us, toll-free in Texas:  800-252-9386.

Free CE and Training This Week – September 10-14

2018 September 10
by Christina Manz

The weekly listing is sourced from Wyoming State Library Training Calendar with free training online, and free Texas workshops, updated as new events are added. See what’s happening on the CE calendar. Confirm the date and time when you register, or follow links for archive information. Events listed in Central Time. 

Tuesday, Sep 11
Diversifying Your Book Club by Selection and Membership (Indiana State Library)
Are you tired of reading the same books for your book clubs? Are you hoping to reach new audiences? Join Tiffani Carter, the manager of the West Indianapolis Branch Library for some tips and best practices to consider when choosing your book club selections and recruiting new participants. For more information and to register, visit: https://continuinged.isl.in.gov/find-training/online-training-series/
Time: 9-10am

Tuesday, Sep 11
Leadership through Convincing & Influencing Part 1 (Utah State Library)
This exciting 2-part webinar is designed to provide realistic strategies that can be immediately used in any encounter in which you want others to agree with you or support your decisions. It will strengthen your confidence and ability to lead, to cultivate win-win solutions to problems, to negotiate effectively when necessary, and to implement change with less resistance from staff and colleagues. For more information and to register, visit: https://heritage.utah.gov/library/workshops
Time: 11-12pm

Tuesday, Sep 11
Autistics in the Library: How Libraries Can More Effectively Serve Patrons and Employees on the Spectrum (Massachusetts Library System)
As the autistic population continues to grow and become more visible across the lifespan, it’s important that libraries of all types know how to effectively serve patrons on the autism spectrum, foster a neurodiverse profession by encouraging autistics to consider librarianship as a career, and successfully employ them as staff. This webinar will provide attendees with a mix of practical strategies and relevant anecdotes from an autistic librarian. Attendees will be encouraged to ask questions and share any helpful insights they may have on the topic. For more information and to register, visit: https://calendar.masslibsystem.org/event/4391235
Time: 11-12pm

Tuesday, Sep 11
Becoming a Socially-Conscious Library (Washington State Library)
As our society becomes more socially aware, libraries (staff, boards and administrations) and our public are finding themselves caught in the middle of the discussion, interest and debate. This session intends to articulate what it means to be a socially-conscious library, issues libraries face in doing-so and charting a path to full engagement as a socially-conscious library. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.sos.wa.gov/library/libraries/firsttuesdays/default.aspx
Time: 11-12pm

Tuesday, Sep 11
The Accidental Law Librarian (State Library of North Carolina)
As the law touches more and more of our daily lives while lawyers price their services out of the average person’s range, the public increasingly turns to libraries for guidance. This presentation will cover the basics of legal research, how to interpret legal questions, and where to send patrons for answers. For more information and to register, visit: https://statelibrary.ncdcr.gov/ld/continuing-education
Time: 9:30-11am

Tuesday, Sep 11
Reads for the Reluctant: Tips and Tools to Help Engage Every Potential Reader (Booklist)
It can be a difficult task to find the right book for a struggling or disconnected reader, but we’re here to help. During this webinar you’ll hear from representatives of Books on Tape/Listening Library, Macmillan Youth, and Lorimer Press, as well as from Allie Stevens, coordinator of this year’s Quick Picks for Reluctant Readers committee. They’ll offer you a variety of resources, including hi/lo titles and audiobooks, that will give you the tools you need to meet your reluctant readers where they’re at. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.booklistonline.com/webinars
Time: 1-2pm

Tuesday, Sep 11
Disasters Happen! Prepare During National Preparedness Month (Federal Depository Library Program)
Every September, National Preparedness Month reminds us to take time to prepare for disasters. This year’s theme is “Disasters Happen. Prepare Now. Learn How.” Tune into this webinar to see an overview of health information resources on preparedness topics, and learn more about making sure your library has plans to serve patrons when disasters occur. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.fdlp.gov/about-the-fdlp/fdlp-events-calendar
Time: 2-3pm

Tuesday, Sep 11
The Latest Must-Have Graphic Novels for Fall (Library Journal)
From manga to memoir, graphic novels offer engaging and diverse stories for readers of all ages. Join moderator Tammy Ivins along with a panel of insiders who will share some of the hottest graphic novels hitting the shelves this season. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.libraryjournal.com/?subpage=Events
Time: 2-3pm

Tuesday, Sep 11
Motivating Your Staff: Strategies for Supervisors (InfoPeople)
Would you like to learn new methods of encouraging and inspiring motivation in your staff? Understanding what motivation is and how it works, is a critical management and leadership skill. Find out how in this one hour webinar. For more information and to register, visit: https://infopeople.org/training/view/webinar
Time: 2-3pm

Tuesday, Sep 11
Mapping the Historic West End: Using Digital Resources to tell the Story of an African American Community (Lyrasis)
This class will show archivists and others interested in community history the results of a year-long effort to tell the story of an historic African American community in Charlotte through a digital mapping project. The class will show how other libraries, museums, community groups, or individuals can organize as well as create digital resources about their neighborhoods in a similar fashion. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.lyrasis.org/services/Pages/Classes.aspx
Time: 2-3pm

Wednesday, Sep 12
NCompass Live: Book vs. Movie: The Ultimate Showdown! (Nebraska Library Commission)
It’s the never-ending battle. Which was better – the book or the movie? Or the TV show. NLC staff will debate this hot button issue and discuss if we thought the book or the screen adaptation was better (it can happen!). Join us as we try to answer the age-old question – Is the book always better than the movie? For more information and to register, visit: http://www.nlc.state.ne.us/scripts/calendar/eventlist.asp?Mode=ALL
Time: 10-11pm

Wednesday, Sep 12
Podcast Playground – Part 2 – Programming with Kids Podcasts (Association for Library Services to Children)
Come play in our Podcast Playground where we’ll listen, explore, and play with the evolving world of kids podcasting. In Part 2, we’ll play with how podcasts can connect with library collections, as well as share ideas for incorporating kids podcasts into programming to inspire curiosity and learning. For more information and to register, visit: http://www.ala.org/alsc/elearning/live-webinars
Time: 11-12pm

Wednesday, Sep 12
MARCH with Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell (Programming Librarian)
Join Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell, co-author and illustrator of the acclaimed graphic novel series March, for a discussion about the Civil Rights Movement and their experience telling Congressman John Lewis’s story. For more information and to register, visit: http://programminglibrarian.org/learn
Time: 1:30-2:30pm

Wednesday, Sep 12
How to Make Event Volunteers Love You (Charity How To)
During this free 45 minute live webinar with A.J. Steinberg you are going to learn how to create a volunteer experience that makes your event volunteers love your organization so they come back and help year-after-year and make your life easier. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.charityhowto.com/nonprofit-live-webinars
Time: 12-1pm

Wednesday, Sep 12
How to Use Segmentation to Reveal Your Best Legacy Donors (Network for Good)
This presentation will show you why legacy giving is vital to your organization; the benefits of legacy giving to both the organization and donor and how to query your list to uncover your best prospects for legacy giving. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.networkforgood.com/webinars/
Time:12-1pm

Wednesday, Sep 12
Hidden Gems (U.S. Census Bureau)
Come learn about the different types of unique and less visible data at the Census Bureau and how this information can be valuable to you.  Understand practical ways to use our data through real life experiences, learn about available resources, and how to compare and contrast the different types of available data. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.census.gov/data/training-workshops/trainings.html
Time:1-2pm

Wednesday, Sep 12
DorobekINSIDER LIVE: Tools, Tech and Tips to Improve Gov Productivity (GovLoop)
Join Christopher Dorobek and his panel of experts on Wednesday as they examine the technology, tools and strategies that public servants are adopting to increase productivity. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.govloop.com/training/
Time:1-2pm

Wednesday, Sep 12
How to Use Design Thinking to Innovate Faster, Better and More Effectively (American Management Association)
Whether you’re talking about cars, toothbrushes, office space or even the creation of an organization’s culture … Design Thinking gives you the tools to innovate, faster and better, in a customer-centric approach. In this “must attend” session, you’ll discover why Design Thinking has become the innovation method of choice across forward thinking industries and how best-in-class companies are applying it across their organizations. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.amanet.org/news/events-calendar.aspx
Time:2-3pm

Wednesday, Sep 12
Using the DOE Data Explorer to Find DOE-Funded Research Data (Federal Depository Library Program)
This webinar will introduce the DOE Data Explorer (DDE), OSTI’s search tool enabling users to locate and access research data resulting from DOE research and development activities. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.fdlp.gov/about-the-fdlp/fdlp-events-calendar
Time:2-3pm

Wednesday, Sep 12
Empower Your Students to Be Digital Leaders on Social Media (edWeb)
To become responsible and fluent users of social media technology, students need real-world opportunities to practice. In this edWebinar, Heather Callihan of Northwest Public Schools in Nebraska will show you how. For more information and to register, visit: https://home.edweb.net/upcoming-webinars/
Time:3-4pm

Thursday, Sep 13
Developing a Strategic Plan for Volunteer Engagement (VolunteerMatch)
Join us as we talk about the fundamentals for creating a strategic plan for volunteer engagement for your organizations. This webinar will include components that should be included as well as ideas for working with organization leaders to include strategic goals for volunteer engagement in your organization’s overall strategic plan. For more information and to register, visit: http://learn.volunteermatch.org/training-topics
Time:10-11am

Thursday, Sep 13
Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents … The Current Population Survey: Methodology and Content
From its original purpose in providing national employment data, to data on voting patterns and internet usage, the Current Population Survey offers terrific breadth and depth of statistics about the U.S.  This presentation by members of the CPS staff at the Census Bureau will go in-depth on the topics included and the methodology used to collect the data for the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the main sponsor of the survey. For more information and to register, visit: http://www.nclaonline.org/
Time:11-12pm

Thursday, Sep 13
The Great Divide: Bridging intergenerational gaps to fully engage your volunteers (Charity Village)
This workshop will consider how to successfully implement volunteer succession planning by bridging the gap between millennial and boomer volunteers. By investigating and implementing innovative methods of engagement, your organization can facilitate the transfer of knowledge and experience between the leaders of today and the leaders of tomorrow. For more information and to register, visit: https://charityvillage.com/cms/active-learning/webinars
Time:12-1pm

Thursday, Sep 13
Building Trust to Skyrocket Fundraising Results (Bloomerang)
Want to build and strengthen trust with your donors quickly? Struggle to get client stories from your program staff? Are your board members reluctant to introduce you to others? Tammy Zonker will teach you the fundamental process of building trust and watch your relationships and fundraising results soar. For more information and to register, visit: https://bloomerang.co/resources/webinars/
Time: 12-1pm

Thursday, Sep 13
Cultural Competence and Responsiveness (YALSA)
Join this free monthly webinar from YALSA. The September topic is on cultural competence and responsiveness. To register, visit: http://www.ala.org/yalsa/onlinelearning/webinar/free_competencies_webinars
Time: 1-2pm

Thursday, Sep 13
Fall for These Must-Haves for Every Elementary to YA Reader (Booklist)
Entice the inquisitive minds of every reader with informative and engaging titles! Whether they’re interested in animal life, STEM resources, coding, biographies, arts and crafts, or YA and middle-grade fiction, readers of all levels will walk away feeling both enlightened and entertained. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.booklistonline.com/webinars
Time: 1-2pm

Thursday, Sep 13
Dietary Supplement Label Database: Advanced Search and Data Download (National Network of Libraries of Medicine)
DSLD provides ready access to label information for dietary supplements marketed in the United States. The content of this class is relevant for those working in consumer health information services. For more information and to register, visit: https://nnlm.gov/training
Time: 1-2pm

Thursday, Sep 13
Evaluating Collections Care Information Resources (Connecting to Collections)
How do you find good information on the care of collections? A lot of materials are available, ranging from printed books and articles to online resources and DVDs, but not all of it is reliable or valid. This webinar will help you learn to separate wheat from chaff when looking for guidance on better collections care. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.connectingtocollections.org/calendar/
Time: 1-2:30pm

Thursday, Sep 13
How to Effectively Teach Social-Emotional Skills to Children Who Exhibit Challenging Behavior (Early Childhood Investigations)
In this webinar we will review why it is essential to develop or adopt a comprehensive social-emotional learning curriculum and discuss practical strategies that teachers can use to proactively teach children necessary social-emotional skills. We will also review how to promote social-emotional learning in the heat of the moment and throughout the day during typical classroom activities. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.earlychildhoodwebinars.com/presentations/
Time:1-2:30pm

Thursday, Sep 13
Reframing the Story: Investment in Black Men And Boys is Vital to Whole Community Health (GrantSpace)
In this webinar, speakers will come together to discuss the importance of redirecting philanthropic investments for justice-oriented collective action and impact, and how that translates in the real world. You will also have the opportunity to learn about the seven elements of the paid-in-full investment strategy, and how to apply this approach to your work, as a grantmaker, nonprofit, government, or community-based entity. Finally, they will also talk about why investing in black men and boys is a key component of justice-oriented collective action, and vital to whole community health. For more information and to register, visit: https://grantspace.org/training/search/format/live/location/online/
Time: 1-2:30pm

Thursday, Sep 13
LinkedIn Marketing Concepts for Nonprofit Professionals (Donor Search)
You: One person making a difference: appear the best you can on LinkedIn: approachable, active as you achieve your personal career milestones. Us: The power of the organization’s message on LinkedIn: well-coordinated, inspiring, successful; its image to the business community: on-point, concise, everyone in the organization reflecting the mission in their own personal profiles. Them: All people who have not yet contributed to your cause but are available to you to research, selectively market to; when inspired by your cause, they offer their expertise, time, and money. Are the three compatible? Yes, if you use the smart LinkedIn concepts. Cohesive? This will take work, but it is attainable. You must feed and cultivate it continually. Collaborative? Ah, the best of all worlds, all of us rowing the boat in the same direction. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.donorsearch.net/flash-classes/
Time: 2-3pm

Thursday, Sep 13
Getting Started with Information Outreach in Your Community: An Introduction (National Network of Libraries of Medicine)
This class will provide a background in cultural competence and outreach skills as librarians make outreach efforts to underserved, underrepresented minority populations in their community. The goal of this course is to offer concrete ideas to enable librarians to initiate outreach programs with these populations. For more information and to register, visit: https://nnlm.gov/training
Time: 2-3pm

Friday, Sep 14
Mentor Programs That Retain and Engage Employees (Training Magazine Network)
Join Libby Powers, as she discusses how to build a strong mentor program that will help you achieve your goals of increasing employee retention and engagement.Retaining and engaging employees are two goals that every organization is striving to achieve. Studies have shown that having engaged employees can drastically improve your bottom line, and a high level of retention is a key indicator that your company is filled with satisfied employees. For more information and to register, visit: https://www.trainingmagnetwork.com/calendar
Time: 10-11am

Friday, Sep 14
What’s Next for RDA and the 3R Project? (American Libraries Live)
Join us for a discussion with representatives from the RSC, the North American RDA Committee, and ALA Publishing, as they address the community feedback to the beta site, changes coming in September and beyond, and how the North American community can contribute to the continuing enhancement of RDA. For more information and to register, visit: https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/al-live/
Time: 12-1pm

A Place to Just Play: A New, Vital Role for Public Libraries, Part 2

2018 September 5
by Henry Stokes

Panoramic shot of the Free Play Room

Free Play Room at Laura’s Library (Credit: Westbank Library)

Yesterday I explained how I discovered the innovative free play programming at my local public library in the Austin area. I reached out to the staff responsible at the Westbank Community Library (Leah Tatgenhorst, Mary Jo Finch, and Autumn Solomon) with some questions I had. Their responses are below.

And if you’d like to learn more about the topic, the staff there are going to host a professional development program on Friday, October 12 in Austin for librarians and educators. More on that below the interview, or jump straight to the workshop details!



What led you to create free play programming? 

The creation of Free Play was serendipitous. Antonio Beuhler, who founded a self-directed education center here in Austin (Abrome), is a frequent educational speaker at the library and leads an education book club for our community. He introduced us to renowned psychologist Dr. Peter Gray, author of Free to Learn.

Westbank Staff with Peter Gray and Antonio Buehler

Westbank Staff with Peter Gray and Antonio Buehler (Credit: Westbank Library)

In his book and his Psychology Today blog, Dr. Gray argues for the importance of play to help children develop decision-making and negotiation skills, become better problem solvers, develop empathy for others, learn how to take and mitigate risks, and of course, have fun. Antonio helped us conceive the program – 3 hours where children engage in mixed-age play and explore materials with little adult interaction.

Over time, children who come to Free Play grow comfortable with their autonomy and develop ownership of the library as a place for them. Their parents support each other in the sometimes difficult process of letting go.

 

Why do you think it’s a good fit for your library?

Self-education is at the heart of the public library mission. Beyond that, in conversations with us, our community has expressed a desire for greater community connection, an interest in their children being safe to play in the community, and concerns about school stress and the resulting stresses on busy families. We were eager to create programming with a drop-in time frame to accommodate schedules and offer a chance to connect with neighbors in a relaxing environment with minimal rules. This is Free Play: free choice, free time, stress free, no expectations, no grades, no instruction. It arises spontaneously and when it has run its course, it fades. Its process is discovery, and its only standard of measurement is how much fun it is.

We encourage visitors to:

  • create their own games
  • develop relationships with people of all ages
  • pursue their own interests
  • read just for fun
  • enjoy unstructured time in a non-homework space

 

Do you have a success story to share? Have you seen it make an impact?

Since we started the program we have had a weekly attendance ranging from 50-100. The numbers have been fantastic, but the real success lies in the connections made. Parents have connected with each other sharing coffee, stories, information and support. Kids are connecting by creating games, sharing materials, and resolving their own disputes. The community is connecting with staff and volunteers by letting us know how much they appreciate a neighborhood place that welcomes joyful noise.


Any challenges you faced, or lessons learned? Anything you’d do differently? Would you do this again?

The opportunity to begin Free Play arose quickly so we focused on preparing programs staff, but in hindsight would have focused on preparing all staff for this shift in programming. It can be challenging sitting back and waiting to intervene when you see children testing the boundaries of a non-traditional library environment. This is something library school did not prepare us for!

It took us a few weeks to determine the layout of the space, which includes a fenced backyard, and to encourage parents to step back and let kids explore freely. We place staff near the entrance to greet families and to make sure no one runs out the front door into the parking lot, but the main goal is to model a hands-off approach while we engage in free play and conversation as adults. We have band aids and ice packs at the ready, but have not had to use them often.

At the outset we envisioned Free Play going from Spring-Summer, but because of the success we have made it a regular program. We are building on the idea by incorporating aspects of Free Play into programming across the board. So short answer, yes we would absolutely do this again. We also are eager to help other librarians embrace Free Play. We will be offering a professional development opportunity for all library staff and educators on Friday, October 12th from 9am-noon at Laura’s Library.

Children playing constructively

Constructive play (Credit: Westbank Library)

 

Did you find it was more or less successful with different age groups?

Our biggest success was with younger kids and their parents, but we are starting to see grandparents and older siblings attend. We are still exploring ways to engage older kids and teens. We had a teen volunteer over the summer and that was a tremendous help. We observed that teens navigate relationships with kids and adults in unique ways, leading to social and emotional learning on all parts. We intend to develop this aspect further.

 

Did you have to educate people to explain the purpose/benefits?

Staff members chat with parents about the importance of self-directed play as a means to learn. We also have a bookmark we hand out which highlights the purpose of Free Play. Parents who stay during Free Play enjoy the camaraderie of other parents and support each other in letting go of their kids for a bit, thereby reducing parental anxieties.

We have also been fortunate that Antonio agreed to facilitate when we started the program to help answer education questions that caretakers inevitably had and to reassure them it’s okay to play! We consciously have made minimal rules to allow children freedom to work out issues on their own without adult intervention. Our simple rules are stay safe, respect others, respect the space, have fun!

Free Play Clean Up

Free Play Clean Up (Credit: Westbank Library)

 


I want to thank the staff at Westbank Community Library for answering my questions and sharing their photos and videos!

If you can make it, be sure to attend their October 12 workshop. Here’s more information about it:


Upcoming Workshop:

Free Play: Preparing Libraries and Communities for an Uncertain Future

Where: Westbank Library, Laura Bush Community Branch

When: October 12th 9am-noon

Who: Speakers include Mary Jo Finch, Director, Leah Tatgenhorst, Programs Manager, Autumn Solomon, Associate Director, Antonio Buehler, education partner. All librarians and educators are welcome to attend! This talk will be of particular interest to program, children & teen librarians, and management.

Play is how children learn to take control of their lives.

-Dr. Peter Gray. Free to Learn

Self-education is at the heart of library missions. Westbank Libraries worked with Dr. Gray to better understand how play helps children develop decision-making and negotiation skills, become better problem solvers, develop empathy for others, and learn how to take and mitigate risks.

The self-directed learning movement, which has free play at its core, is an engaging and simple way to bring your community together. Play is an essential part of childhood, and libraries are a natural partner to offer programs that support discovery through open-ended, child-directed play. Westbank Libraries created Free Play, a 3-hour weekly program that welcomes joyful noise and encourages parents to sit back while their kids explore and discover together.

Topics of this presentation will include: becoming antifragile, the importance of play and child-directed learning, logistics of free play and open ended programming and how to adapt it to your library. A light breakfast will be served, doors open at 8:30am. Come and get your questions answered, and engage in some free play of your own!

To register, please email programs@westbanklibrary.com with your name, library and how many will attend. Registration is not mandatory, but helpful for planning.


Additional resources:


 

A Place to Just Play: A New, Vital Role for Public Libraries, Part 1

2018 September 4
by Henry Stokes

Back in the spring, I attended a talk by a visiting lecturer at my local library. Peter Gray, a psychology professor at Boston College and author of the book, Free to Learn, was there to speak on the topic of “Play Deficit Disorder: A National Crisis and How to Solve It Locally”. I was to discover from the talk that one way to solve the problem of the “play deficit” locally is… the public library itself.

In his talk, Gray defined what he meant by “play”, its extreme importance to all humans’ development, how school-aged kids were now being deprived of it, the cost of that deprivation, and what to do about it.

You may be wondering as I was about this “play deficit” – what is that? Gray explained that, over the last 60 years, our society has increasingly taken children’s freedom to play away from them. It’s been gradual enough that we may not have even noticed it. What was once normal, accepted practice throughout human history: allowing children to go out and play by themselves with other children – is now regarded as negligence. From one generation to the next, the number of hours children play outside unaccompanied has been cut in half. And the range of play, the kinds of play activities, and where they can play, have all been severely limited. School hours during the day have increased, and recesses have been reduced or removed altogether from the schedule. Outside of school, many children have had their “free” time after school heavily scheduled with non-play-oriented activities. They no longer have time and space to go out and be by themselves with other children to make and direct their own games and activities. It’s during play, Gray explains, that children are able to develop the basic life skills they must acquire in order to grow up, be successful, and have a meaningful life.

According to Gray, children appear to be suffering from this deprivation of play. Research shows that school-age teenagers are eight times more depressed and anxious than they were in the 1950s. The suicide rate for children under age 15 has increased six-fold since the 1950s and doubled in the last 10 years. In the same time frame, suicide rate for the middle-aged has not increased at all, and for seniors has actually decreased dramatically. Older folks are doing fine, and the kids are suffering. Gray sees a correlation between the lack of play opportunities among school-age children and these rising rates of their depression and anxiety.

So how can the public library help? It occurred to me after Gray’s talk that libraries are perfectly positioned to address this issue. They are already reliable, established places in the community where self-directed learning and play, unaccompanied by adults, is encouraged. Libraries offer up their books, services, and resources like a playground for people to engage in – where no one is judged and patrons have the freedom to pursue individual passions. Programs can be provided for school-age children and teens that are outside of, and unrestricted by, the schools. By providing free play opportunities, libraries can carve out the space and time, found lacking in children’s everyday lives, for local kids and teens to play and develop the basic life skills they need. Play is a crucial tool for social and emotional learning, developing creativity, problem solving, and conflict resolution. Libraries can step up and provide this important service to their communities.

After this illuminating talk, I discovered something else surprising: my local public library, Westbank Community Library, the host of Peter Gray’s talk, has already started to step up! They have begun running numerous programs all around the idea of free play inspired by Gray’s book and ideas. I soon started bringing my four-year old twins to the library’s “Free Play & Food Trucks” every Monday afternoon. I stood in the back of the library with the other parents and library staff, trying desperately to stay inconspicuous and un-involved (not always easy as the impulse is to participate), as all ages of children played, unrestrained, with various toys and games that had been strewn about a large interior and exterior part of the library’s property. There was no set program, theme, or objective – just free play.

Panoramic shot of the Free Play Room

Free Play Room at Laura’s Library (Photo Credit: Westbank Library)

I wanted to learn more. Why was the library doing this? What inspired it? How was it going? Any lessons learned? Would other libraries be interested in similar approaches? Check out Part 2 for an interview with Westbank Community Library staff to hear more about their innovative Free Play programming and its impact.

 


Additional resources:


 

A message from the Director of Library Development & Networking

2018 September 4
tags:
by Kyla Hunt

Jennifer PetersA message from the Director of LDN

September 1 marks the one-year anniversary of my becoming Director of Library Development and Networking at TSLAC. Transitioning from program staff to the Director has been exciting, terrifying, exhilarating, and exhausting, sometimes all at the same time!

I spent my first year getting to know the Division and discovering the role we play in the larger agency. I’m humbled by the amazing talent in this Division.

I’d like to spend my second year getting to know you better. If you’re a member of a regional library group, or if you get together with other librarians regularly for shop talk, I’d love to join you this fall and winter to hear your thoughts about the future of Texas libraries and how TSLAC can help.  I’m also available for presentations if you would like some professional development along with a conversation. I’m happy to go anywhere—I love every part of Texas! Please feel free to drop me a line if you have a meeting planned and I’ll try to find a way to get there. A couple of weeks advance notice is much appreciated.

You can reach me at Jennifer Peters, jpeters@tsl.texas.gov.