Andrew Jackson Donelson to Ebenezer Allen, December 10, 1844

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Andrew Jackson Donelson to Ebenezer Allen, December 1844

nations of the earth, there has been no motive


or wish for this concealment. It has been treated


from the beginning of the present period, as a


measure called for by the common good, extending


it is true the territorial limits of the United


States, but not in the spirit of unworthy ambition


or aggrandizement, or as a disturbing cause


in the general peace of the world, or even the


special interest of Mexico herself. On the


contrary the measure was adopted as one of


peace, necessarily growing out of the physical


features of the Territory of Texas and the character


of her population, and equally important as


one of security to Mexico by removing all


apprehension respecting the future agitation of the


question of boundary.

But it is not the intention of the


undersigned to state at large, on this occasion,


the views taken by his Government of the question


of annexation as one foreign to Texas and


the United States. He adverts to them only for


the purpose of introducing the observations


promised in his note of the 6th inst., and


which relate to the question as now confined


to these two countries.

If Mexico, under a mistaken

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Andrew Jackson Donelson to Ebenezer Allen, December 10, 1844. United States Diplomatic Correspondence, Texas Secretary of State records, Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Page last modified: April 5, 2011