Table of ContentsThe Second Great AwakeningAbolition and the Early Women's Rights MovementA God-Given Right to CitizenshipAngels Don't VoteAfrican-American Men Get the VoteThe Suffrage Movement Falls ShortTexas Joins the BattleComing of AgeThe Battle Lost and WonAftermathBeginnings of the MovementHomeAll Men Are Created EqualThe Second Great AwakeningAbolition and the Early Women's Rights MovementA God-Given Right to CitizenshipAngels Don't VoteAfrican-American Men Get the VoteThe Suffrage Movement Falls ShortTexas Joins the BattleComing of AgeThe Battle Lost and WonAftermathBeginnings of the MovementHome

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Elizabet Ney

Sculptor Elizabet Ney joined the cause.

Susan B. Anthony to Mariana Folsom, 1903

Mariana Folsom kept up a correspondence with national leaders, including Susan B. Anthony.

 

Texas Joins the Battle

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Annette Finnigan

In 1903, the movement was revived by Annette Finnigan and her two sisters, Elizabeth and Katherine. The Texas Women's Suffrage Association formed chapters in Houston, Galveston, and La Porte with the intentions of organizing all over the state. However, the next year the Finnigan sisters moved from Texas. Bereft of the strong leadership of Annette, the Texas Women's Suffrage Association went the way of its predecessor and ceased activity by 1905.

Profile: Annette Finnigan (1873-1940)

Annette Finnigan was born in West Columbia, Texas, and grew up in Houston. Her parents sent her east for schooling, and she graduated from Wellesley College in Massachusetts in 1894. A fine athlete with a strong interest in the fine arts, Finnigan traveled abroad before returning to Houston. In 1903 she and her sisters Elizabeth and Katherine organized equal suffrage leagues in Houston and Galveston and helped form a statewide woman suffrage organization, with Annette as president.

Annette and her sisters moved away, and the movement languished. When her father died in 1909, Finnigan took over his business and traveled between New York and Houston. In 1913 she resumed her work for women's suffrage in Texas, sharing leadership of the Texas Woman Suffrage Association with Mary Eleanor Brackenridge of San Antonio. She lobbied the legislature until 1916, when she contracted a paralysis of her right side, which disabled her arm and required her to use a cane. She retired from public life, devoting the rest of her time to traveling and acting as a benefactor of the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston and the Houston Public Library.

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Page last modified: August 24, 2011