Murrah to "My Countrymen," April 27, 1865

Page 1

The surrender of Robert E. Lee at Appomattox on April 9, 1865, did not bring an immediate end to the Civil War in Texas. Although many Texans believed that the time had come to accept defeat, and many soldiers deserted their posts and headed for home, Governor Murrah spoke for those who wanted to fight on.

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Murrah to "My Countrymen," page 1

Executive Department

Austin April 27th 1865

My countrymen --

Disaster has

befallen our arms in Virginia.

Our chosen chieftan Robert

E. Lee, victorious on so many

glorious fields is a prisoner

of war and a portion of his

army has surrendered.

These

unforeseen calamities impose

additional responsibilities on the state

of Texas. My object now is

briefly to point you to the

path of duty, to exhort

you by all the considerations which

make life desirable or

existence tolerable to pursue

that path without falter-

ing or flinching.

Your

faith, your honor and

your manhood are pledged

to your brethren east of the

Mississippi. For four

years they have fought your

battles and stood, a wall

of fire, between you and

the invader. Their cause is

your cause. Their fate is

inseparably yours. They look

now with eager eyes and

anxious hearts to the people

and armies of this department

for rescue and deliverance.

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Murrah to "My Countrymen," April 27, 1865, Records of Pendleton Murrah, Texas Office of the Governor, Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Page last modified: March 30, 2011