Fairfax Catlett to Sam Houston, September 5, 1837

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Fairfax Catlett to Sam Houston, September 1837

in a hail storm. He will keep himself out of it if he can[.]


If he cannot he will bend to it and trust in


an overruling Providence! Under existing circumstances


I believe that he is opposed to the measure.

In a question of so much moment and intricacy,


it would be idle in me to attempt more than a general


outline of the prudent position and probable wishes of the


Government of the United States in relation to the annexation


of Texas. I cannot regard it as strange that they should


have declined treating upon the subject. Indeed I


look upon it as a product which might easily have been


foreseen. Yet it was not the less necessary that the


proposition should be made. It has been made, declined,


and it now rests with the Congress of the United States


to determine whether whether Texas shall add another


star to the cluster of the Union or—commence the


conquest of the whole of Mexico.

I have taken the liberty of addressing your


Excellency upon this subject and perhaps of too freely


forwarding one or two of my own opinions thereupon[,] still


I beg leave to indulge a hope that even if they should


be regarded as the visions of vain inexperience, that they


will find some credit with your Excellency, as my sincere


convictions—nothing doubting that whatever fallacy may


exist in them will be easily detected by a mind so well


skilled in the governing motives which control the actions


of public men agreeably to their respective characters.

I am now engaged in copying a rejoinder, pre-


pared by General Hunt to the answer of the Secretary


of State[.] But the negotiation may be regarded as


closed for the present.

The members of Congress are all here, and


have assembled for the specific purpose of arranging the


currency and for that exclusively[.] Numerous enquiries


are made about you by your old acquaintances and


former comperes in politics. The late elections

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Fairfax Catlett to Sam Houston, September 5, 1837. Andrew Jackson Houston Papers #1314, Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Page last modified: April 5, 2011