Telegrams on Trouble at Sandy Point,


July-August, 1877

Page 1

The 1870s were the most violent and lawless period in Texas history. Outlaws, vigilantes, and desperados made the Texas frontier their playground. Vigilantes carried out home-grown justice according to their own lights. Horse thievery and cattle rustling were a constant problem. And racial animosity between whites, Hispanics, and African Americans brewed beneath the surface of many incidents.

This dramatic series of telegrams shows an outbreak of violence at Sandy Point in Brazoria County and how Governor Hubbard reacted. Hubbard's correspondent is Will Lambert, a Houston-area journalist, aide-de-camp to Governor Hubbard, and colonel in the Texas State Guard.

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Page 10 |
"The Wild West"

Holderman to Coke, page 1

Dated Houston TX 1877


Received at Austin July 14


To Gov R.B. Hubbard

Negroes in armed force


at Sandy Point in


superior numbers to the


whites give me orders


to use troops to


disperse the rioters

Will Lambert


Col A.D.C.

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Page 10 |
"The Wild West"

Telegrams on Trouble at Sandy Point, July-August, 1877, Records of Richard Hubbard, Texas Office of the Governor, Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Page last modified: March 30, 2011