Is MP3 Really Dead?

Many news articles in the past week have reported dramatic variants of “MP3 is Dead!”, so we wanted to publish a short post about the topic since it relates to file formats and providing access to e-records. I came across a blog article by a web developer and realized there was more to the story…

Texas Digital Archive Virtual Scavenger Hunt

Did you know that October is Texas Archives Month? The Texas State Library and Archives Commission has a full page of local events to celebrate the conservation of Texas history. Of particular interest to state and local records managers, there will be a Digital Archive Virtual Scavenger Hunt this Monday, October 10, here at the…

e-Records Conference 2015: Introducing the Texas Digital Archive

This is the first post of a multi-part recap of the 2015 e-Records Conference. Presentation materials from the e-Records Conference are available on the e-Records 2015 website. The Beginning The Texas Digital Archive (TDA) has been a topic of interest for years, but it wasn’t until this past year that the project picked up traction and resulted…

e-Records Conference 2014: Texas Digital Archive update

This is the sixth and final post of a multi-part recap of the 2014 e-Records Conference. Presentation materials from the e-Records Conference are available on the e-Records 2014 website. By Angela Ossar, Government Information Analyst I don’t think I’m the only one who looked forward to Mark Myers’ presentation with great anticipation. Mark is TSLAC’s…

E-Records Forum 2013: Audits of Trustworthy Digital Repositories

This is the second post in a multi-part recap of the 2013 NAGARA E-Records Forum. One of the major differences I’ve noticed between the archives field and the records management field is the relative lack of standards in the former and an abundance of standards in the latter. However, because digital records need to be…

e-Records 2012: The Fascinating (and a Little Frightening) World of Computer Forensics

I think I speak for everyone in Craig Ball’s session, “e-Discovery: Nerdy Things You Should Know About Computer Forensics,” when I say that computer forensics (when explained right) is downright riveting.

Ninety-two percent of information is born digital. This means that, increasingly, forensic evidence is digital. In a rousing afternoon session, Ball talked about the treasure trove of evidence that we leave behind when we use computers and smart phones, and introduced computer forensics as the way that we find the story behind the human drama of what people see, hide, steal, and think – essentially, using our digital fingerprints to read minds.

Sometimes these fingerprints are more overt than others, […]

NAGARA-CoSA 2012: Digital Preservation 101

This article is the first in a series of our takeaways from the 2012 NAGARA-CoSA Annual Conference. By Angela Ossar, Government Information Analyst It’s probably safe to say that, somewhere in your agency, you’re storing the only copy of a permanent record in a digital format.  Maybe it’s because the original was scanned and then…